Liberation and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.99
  • Save: $1.80 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Liberation: Being the Adventures of the Slick Six After the Collapse of the United States of America Paperback – October 14, 2008


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, October 14, 2008
$16.19
$0.94 $0.01


Frequently Bought Together

Liberation: Being the Adventures of the Slick Six After the Collapse of the United States of America + Lost Everything
Price for both: $29.34

Buy the selected items together
  • Lost Everything $13.15

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 299 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; First Edition edition (October 14, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765320460
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765320469
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,409,247 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This sophomore effort from economics editor Slattery (Spaceman Blues) is a heavy-handed fable of a near-future America fallen into economic and social chaos. Marco Angelo Oliveira breaks out of prison, determined to rejoin the Slick Six, his family of supercriminals. He meets stiff opposition from the Aardvark, a mob boss who now runs New York City. Meanwhile, the nation has fragmented into squabbling regions, from the New Dominion of Virginia to the New Sioux of the plains; like Marco's gang, they see little reason to reunite. Complex secondary characters such as mob lawyer Jeannette Winderhoek and the less-feted members of the Slick Six somewhat balance the heavily stereotyped Marco and the Aardvark, adding vital color to this glacially slow, backstory-laden tale. (Oct.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Slattery presents a hallucinatory vision of the end of America caused not by the usual sf culprits—disease, war, aliens—but by an entirely plausible economic collapse. What happens, he posits, when you lose the “laws and regulations but leave the capitalism”? The past returns with a vengeance, that’s what. Land is for the grabbing again, slavery reemerges, and Indians rise to reclaim their heritage. Notorious criminal the Aardvark, recognizing the opportunities in the slave trade, invests early and builds an empire, ruling from his Manhattan tower. Opposing him are the Slick Six, international criminals led by Marco, who intends a revolution out of which America can be reborn. Marco’s odyssey through a wasted America is full of legendary characters and strange sights, from the murdering circus of Cyclone Cal to the traveling home of the hippie Americoids. Slattery’s story is like a vivid dream with startlingly lucid moments, and his prose has the cadence of a spoken-word poet. He affords a kind of revelation about how history informs us as individuals and as a country. --Krista Hutley

More About the Author

Brian Francis Slattery is the author of Spaceman Blues, Liberation, and Lost Everything, as well as a handful of short stories. He edits public-policy publications by day and is a musician by night; he is also an editor of the New Haven Review. He lives just outside of New Haven, CT with his family.

Customer Reviews

Every one of the characters were too shallowly drawn for my tastes.
Justus Pendleton
And the other guy will be like "Yeah, it was just like the time you climbed that thing and then jumped off and did a cartwheel and found the thing we needed."
Pen Nombre
This is a good book and one I would be comfortable recommending to people in my circle of sci-fi fans.
Adam Goldberg

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Monkey VINE VOICE on November 8, 2008
Format: Paperback
If you love your future dystopian, then this is the book you want to get and read as this is one of the more interesting dystopian future books since Little Brother. While Brian Francis Slattery who wrote the book could not have foreseen what is happening on the stock market, housing bubble, manufacturing collapse that is happening now when he originally penned the book, it is strangely prophetic with ties deep into what is happening today. The premise of the book is that after a monumental collapse of the American economic system, the USA is divided and controlled by warlords, where everything that can happen happens, including slavery.

The hero of the story is Marco Angelo Oliveira who flees from a prison ship after he has been there five years. The goal of Marco is to return to his old gang and get it going again. When he gets back to New York he finds that members of his old gang have been sold into slavery. He is also surprised by people working for food, and the general economic collapse that has happened while he was in prison. The Warlord of New York though wants no one to interfere with his rule, meaning we are in for an exciting climax between anti-hero and warlord in a frenetic fast-paced conclusion to the story. The conclusion to the story though is amazingly satisfying, and leaves the reader thinking that the story is truly over until the next book comes out.

What is amazing about this story though is that the world is rich enough to provide a playground for other writers to work within.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Science Fiction and Marketing on January 1, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A little too close to reality for comfort, Brian Francis Slattery's Liberation depicts events in a post economic meltdown caused by America's over-borrowing. As a result the dollar collapses as does the government. Unfortunately, this dystopian vision kind of makes you tap your fingers nervously as you think about the real crisis.

The ensuing riots and warmongering produce a hellacious world where slavery reappears and the ghosts of the past rise to walk the land. It's an amazing depiction of many cultural wrongs and excesses this country has engaged in.

And the story of the Slick Six is a compelling one that provides just enough to engage you, but not so much as to make you skip ahead. This story really is about America, not so much the Six, which other than Marco, seem to be vehicles for the larger story.

My one beef with the book was more stylistic. I'm not a big fan of long Faulkneresque paragraphs and this book had plenty of them. In addition the tangential movement between stories required an adjustment, but eventually started working for me. All in all, a great read that I highly recommend.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Justus Pendleton on March 7, 2009
Format: Paperback
This is a relatively popular and well reviewed book. Several end-of-year lists put it at or near the top for all SF in 2008.

I appear to be one of the few that was less than enamoured by Liberation.

Every one of the characters were too shallowly drawn for my tastes. Each is supposed to be part of the Slick Six: a group of quasi-Robin Hood superhero-ish types that were so talented that they stole hundreds of millions of dollars. No real indication of their talents (other than Marco's ability to kill) is given through the course of the book, leaving the reader with no real understanding of why they were so feared/revered. They all have an aura of superheros -- especially Marco being the protege of "Red Kwon" and the weird Kung Fu type moves that The Assassin knows.

Combine that with the constant presence of The Vibe and I wasn't sure if I was supposed to take the book seriously or not. But the presence of Marco's extreme violence, cannibalism, and slavery harshes my vibe. It is hard to take a dystopian future as light reading but it feels like that's what Slattery was aiming for.

The plot is inconsequential and nonsensical. We are supposed to believe that the Aardvark is the lynchpin of the modern American anarchy -- though he didn't do anything but fill the void created by the collapse of the state -- and removing him will allow America to be "reborn". Or something.

The details of the plot don't make any sense: slavery is legal in the US but certainly not in Japan so why are Zeke et al still "slaves" of the pirate captain when they visit Kimura?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By K. Scott Proctor VINE VOICE on April 14, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Liberation" is an interesting book about what life might look like if the United States were ever to suffer a cataclysmic economic collapse. In this work of fiction, Brian Slattery draws an interesting series of threads together to paint a picture of life without many of the essentials Americans take for granted.

The storyline is engaging, yet it is peppered with "60s-esque" stylistic passages. These passages convey a sense of change and revolution, but they often seem forced and inserted somewhat arbitrarily.

Moreover, Slattery pushes many characters and scenes together with rambling musical anecdotes. Slattery expresses an interest in music and "alternative" views of society in this novel.

Despite the "off the beaten path" prose and narrative, this is an enjoyable book to read. Slattery's commentary regarding the economic collapse of the US seems prescient from the vantage point of May 2009.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?