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Liberty Street Hardcover – October 1, 2003


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Hardcover, October 1, 2003
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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 1-5-Kezia belongs to Missus Grace, a widow. Monday is wash day, Tuesday is ironing day, and so on throughout the week, but Sunday is special because the slaves are allowed to go visiting without passes. They call the dirt path that leads downtown "Liberty Street." Kezia's mother sends her to the home of a free black woman who teaches slave children to read and write and makes plans for her daughter to join a group preparing to take the Underground Railroad to Canada. The book ends on a bittersweet note, as the girl begins her journey to freedom, leaving her mother behind to help others. Narrated by Kezia, the story is filled with emotion and suspense. Velasquez's dramatic illustrations make powerful use of light and shadow, shape and composition, and rich colors in this wrenching yet inspirational tale.
Anna DeWind Walls, Milwaukee Public Library
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

PreS-Gr. 3. The anguish of family separation under slavery is at the heart of this moving picture book told in the voice of Kezia, a young girl in Fredericksburg, Virginia, who is helped by her mother to escape to Canada. Velasquez' bold oil paintings show the cruelty of the slave owner's selling Kezia's dad. In contrast are the pictures depicting the supportive ties that give Kezia the strength to attend a secret school and then to wrench herself from her beloved mother and teacher and run to freedom. Along with the personal story, children will be interested in the history that is part of the pictures and explained in a final note, especially the description of the "clothesline telegraph," which made use of a white shirt to signal that it wasn't safe to run and a red one to mean, "Go!" The double-page spread of a red shirt swinging on the line is like a shout of triumph. Hazel Rochman
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 6 - 9 years
  • Grade Level: 1 - 4
  • Lexile Measure: 510L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Walker Childrens (October 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802788696
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802788696
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 0.2 x 11.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,346,786 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Though I've published 115 books, I feel I'm just now writing the books I was meant to write. As a ninth generation Virginian, I've often written about my native state--historical fiction, nonfiction, biography. A few years ago, I decided to write funny contemporary books set in Virginia. IVA HONEYSUCKLE DISCOVERS THE WORLD (Disney-Hyperion) and REBEL MCKENZIE (Disney-Hyperion) both celebrate life in small quirky towns that can be found anywhere in the South. Where else would you find a cat named Doublewide with a fondness for pudding cups? Where else would double-first cousins be best-best friends or (in Iva's case) best-enemies? I love writing books for kids and teens that will make them laugh and inspire them to explore the richness of their own backyards, no matter where they live.




Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on March 31, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This book is about a black girl,Kezia,who is a slave and so is her parents. They have to do chores everyday excepted for Sundays when the slave owners let them free for a while. One day her father got sold somebody. Then her mother told her about a secret scool which the teacher is a slave woman. One day theteachertalked to them about Canada. She said that everyone in Canada is free to do what ever they want. Then one day Kezia's mom told her that she was being sold. So one night her mom sent her with other people to Liberty Steet.Liberty Street was a way to get to Canada. Her mom didn't goes with her because there wasn't enough space. I think this book is good and teaches people aboutthe past and how badly black people where treated and how smart they were to find a way to escape.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on April 1, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This book is awesome, it has great characters, its a good story, and it is historicaly correct. It teaches kids that things happen in life that you would never expect. And it also shows them what African Americans went through. And how they should appreciate how our land is today. And it isn't very hard to understand. So thats why I say that this is a wonderfull book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on March 31, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Liberty Street is a great children's book. It teaches you about slaves and how they use to always wonder what it would be like to be free. I liked this book because it was written in first person point of view which tells you what they were thinking and how they felt about the situation that couldn't be free.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on March 31, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Liberty Street is a very excellent book. It had a very good plot and the characters were very exciting.The book was just great. I recommend everybody to read this book.
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Format: Hardcover
This is a beautifully written and illustrated picture about slavery. The little girl learns to read in a secret school called Liberty Street, and it is there she learns about Canada. When she learns that her Missus is going to hire her out to her sister the little girl knows it is her time to escape on the Underground Railroad.

I highly recommend this book. It is one I am going to add to my library.
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