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67 of 70 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Documenting the Sexual Revolution
This is the long version of Jones' mature thesis about the sexual revolution. Liberally notated with references to original works, some in the original languages, Jones' magnum opus is hard, perhaps even impossible, to refute on its own terms. Only a hardcore fan of the sexual revolution or Enlightenment will take issue with Jones' argument.
The idea that...
Published on September 30, 2000 by William P. Cunningham

versus
24 of 36 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Book too Far
This physically impressive book does not live up to the promise implicit in the author's quirky, but interesting, previous works. Problems start at a low level. Typographical errors of a sort impossible to miss (e.g., missing or superfluous words) appear every two or three pages and suggest that the manuscript was not carefully proofread. I could live with Jones'...
Published on January 24, 2001


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67 of 70 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Documenting the Sexual Revolution, September 30, 2000
By 
William P. Cunningham "wmpat" (San Antonio, TX United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Libido Dominandi (Hardcover)
This is the long version of Jones' mature thesis about the sexual revolution. Liberally notated with references to original works, some in the original languages, Jones' magnum opus is hard, perhaps even impossible, to refute on its own terms. Only a hardcore fan of the sexual revolution or Enlightenment will take issue with Jones' argument.
The idea that disordered sex issues in violence is not new, nor is it restricted to the musings of counter-revolutionary academics like Jones. One can find it in the 10 p.m. newscast of any large city: Miranda, Scott's live-in, dumps Scott and Scott kills Miranda.
Still, few authors have had the tenacity of Jones, who traces the sexual revolution back to its Enlightenment roots, and as carefully as anyone can desire shows the dependency of Sade and Shelley on Weishaupt's infamous Illuminati techniques. Not content with that coup, Jones pulls in Freud and Jung, damning them with their own words. Advertising and other forms of social control get their own skewers as well.
In short, Libido Dominandi (note the serious pun in the title) is what everyone needs to know about how the power elite keeps the little guy under control, materially impoverished, and spiritually destitute.
If you can't find the time to read 600 pages, get the short version, Monsters of the Id, which is less well documented, but somewhat more entertaining.
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78 of 84 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Casualties of the sexual revolution, February 17, 2003
By 
Michael S. Swisher (Stillwater, Minnesota USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Libido Dominandi (Hardcover)
The thesis of E. Michael Jones's "Libido Dominandi" is that, far from really liberating anyone, "sexual liberation" has served to deliver powerful means of social and political manipulation and control into the hands of our ruling élite. He marshals some impressive evidence. Here we read about Edward Bernays, Sigmund Freud's nephew and the founding father of the public relations industry, who was among the first to realize how sexual imagery could be employed in advertising. Long before the infamous "Virginia Slims" ad campaign, Bernays used the suggestion that cigarette smoking was an act of feminist independence to sell Lucky Strikes to women. Here we see the origins of the Planned Parenthood organization in the hope that birth control and abortion would reduce the numbers of the poor (especially ethnic Catholics and blacks), and resolve the dilemma of the welfare state. Here we learn of the fraudulent methodology of sex researcher Alfred Kinsey, the sordid character of much of his "research," and the way in which Kinsey manipulated his academic superiors and his chief sources of funding through an implicit threat of blackmail, because these people had been foolish enough to give him their "sexual histories." The rôle of the Rockefeller Foundation in both the Planned Parenthood and Kinsey enterprises was motivated by the obsaession of John D. Rockefeller III with eugenics, the pseudo-science of "race improvement." We learn also of the profound antipathy of the eugenicists and sex researchers towards Roman Catholicism, which they viewed as their principal adversary. Jones exposes the origins of "Americans United for the Separation of Church and State" in the anti-Catholic bigotry of Paul Blanshard. The organizations described here present a façade of respectability to the public that would not be so easy for them to maintain if their backgrounds were better publicized.
Jones's case would be more persuasive had this book come under a firmer editorial hand. It is lengthy, but also repetitive. Some material is duplicated almost verbatim in several parts of the book; also, Jones repeats, again almost verbatim, material from his other books, "Dionysos Rising," "Decadent Moderns," and "Monsters from the Id." This book might have been cut to half its length with as good or better effect than it now has. The work also fails in its efforts to tie the all-too-genuine mischief wrought by the sexual revolution together as the result of some sort of "Illuminist" conspiracy. Jones is a Roman Catholic polemicist of the old-fashioned type, for whom no Roman prelate (at least before Vatican II) ever did wrong, and no Protestant ever did right. He writes with the vehemence of a pamphleteer in the time of the sixteenth-century French wars of religion, and would probably have been perfectly happy under the patronage of the third duke of Guise. While many conservative Catholics, his intended audience, will be undisturbed by this tone, it is likely to put off many others who might otherwise be interested in Jones's factual reportage and sympathetic to his conclusions. This is unfortunate, since both deserve to be more widely known.
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40 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Les Parents Terribles, May 8, 2001
By 
This review is from: Libido Dominandi (Hardcover)
This book is simply brilliant.
Jones has a strong, clear style and is in complete control of his subject matter. He has thought through what so many others have only hinted at. He is a Catholic Nietzsche - he philosophizes with a hammer; and how much more sane and deliberate than Nietzsche himself.
This is a revolutionary book. It exposes the horror lurking beneath the make-up caked suface of the modern world. It deserves as wide a reading as possible.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The picture Michael Jones Paints is sobering., November 24, 2007
This review is from: Libido Dominandi (Hardcover)
I'm impressed with Jone's work. He is truly gifted. He sees things for what they are. He is largely untainted by modern peer pressures, misinformation, and the apathy infecting the zombies of today.

This is not a simple read. I could only consume it in small doses. Contemplating, weighing the meaning, and putting it (his take of events) into context 'that makes sense to me' severely taxed my small brain.

Furthermore, I find that his thoughts run parallel with mine. Too bad it'll never get the acclaim it deserves on a mass scale because those that have the power to make it so, I'm certain, do not share his perspective. Yes, among others, you Oprah Winfrey.

Besides those who would benefit mostly from this book are likely incapable of comprehending its relativity.

To Dr. David Donelson, "Thank you for recommending this book".

V/R,

Robert
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eye Opening, August 25, 2006
This review is from: Libido Dominandi: Sexual Liberation & Political Control (Paperback)
I have read most of what Mr.Jones has written to date, and find each book compelling. This one takes the cake - a long read and one which requires concentration, but opens the eyes to a cultural concept that is not at all understood when we review the history of our culture. What we have inherited, the sins of the father, has polluted our culture to its core. Read this and pass it around - it ties nicely into Degerate Moderns, and syncs with Johnson's Intellectuals.

One review speaks of typos - and a poorly proofed manuscript. Unfortunately this is true. It didn't reduce the impact of this great work to me, but it really should be corrected - before I buy the hardcover for my library.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Revolutionary Will-to-Power and esoteric groups, August 26, 2010
This review is from: Libido Dominandi: Sexual Liberation & Political Control (Paperback)
E. Michael Jones is one of the best critics of the French Revolution since Edmund Burke. Perhaps he is a better critic if far less well known, because he does not just attack la Revolution itself but also the theoretical and causal underpinnings for it.

Marx missed the boat on his analysis of history. Class conflict is a factor. At times it is just a tool. Likewise the collapse of sexual mores can be a tool in the hands of the powerful, for other ends besides the usual explicit goal of social "liberation" and its frequent companion "equality." Of course in later works by Jones we find out that maybe Marx did not miss the boat, rather, he miss-stated the boat, so that other fools would fall into it and the control of his collaborators. A pattern that takes an earlier form in the esoteric group machinations revealed in this book.

Jones deconstructs the deconstructionists. He aptly shows how the criticism and attack on traditional and Roman Catholic sexual mores is less a form of patriarchal oppression, than a new sort of oppression being readied for the gullible masses.

In a way Jones' world-view is deeply classical. There are cycles of political change and social changes often preceed those of constitutional structure. Problems of government come down to man's nature, which does not really change from generation to generation, so the patterns of governmental change will repeat themselves. Contrast that to the Enlightenment notion of "progress." A fiction that suggests "things are gradually getting better." In my mind, more of a fiction, and the reality is that social problems emerge from man's fallen nature. That nature is going to stay the same so to some extent social problems will always be with us, just as Christ said of the impoverished, and so we perhaps might be better off working on fixing our own internal fallen natures than always trying to fiddle with "improving" this or that cause celebre du jour.
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24 of 36 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Book too Far, January 24, 2001
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This review is from: Libido Dominandi (Hardcover)
This physically impressive book does not live up to the promise implicit in the author's quirky, but interesting, previous works. Problems start at a low level. Typographical errors of a sort impossible to miss (e.g., missing or superfluous words) appear every two or three pages and suggest that the manuscript was not carefully proofread. I could live with Jones' discursive style in his earlier books, but in this one entire paragraphs are repeated verbatim. (Compare page 368 to page 522.)
The most serious problems in this book involve content. I am sympathetic with the author's thesis that modern society is harmed by sexual promiscuity and that nowadays sex is frequently used as a tool to manipulate others. Jones' criticism of Kinsey appears, in particular, to be on target. But in an effort to tie together the various vignettes that make up this book, Jones seems to lend undue credence to various conspiracy theories and to overreach in the conclusions he draws from the available evidence. The author's denial of the reality of mental illness is not the only part of this book in which he comes across as more Catholic than the Pope. (See John Paul II's 11/30/96 address to the Pontifical Council for Pastoral Assistance to Health-Care Workers.)
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7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should be top 100 books of all time, January 10, 2013
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This review is from: Libido Dominandi (Hardcover)
Libido Dominandi is a great treatise on how sexual liberalism/liberation is actually an instrument of control.
"Liberalism, by the inner dynamic of its its logic, was forced to become an instrument of social control in order to avoid the chaos which it created by its own erosion of traditions and morals. Democratic man man could be left to his one devices; chaos would result. The logic was clear, if there is no God, there can be no religion; if there is no religion, there can be no morals; if there are no morals, there can be no self-control; if there is no self-control, there can be no social order; if there is no social order, there can be nothing but the chaos of competing desires. But we cannot have chaos, so therefore we must institute behavioral control in place of the traditional structures of the past - tradition, religion, etc." the problem comes then who are the controlling entities.

Great book but not a light read. Being Catholic myself, think this book should be read with the great work of Saint Augustine's "The city of God".
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Insightful Read, February 2, 2013
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This review is from: Libido Dominandi: Sexual Liberation & Political Control (Paperback)
The author repeats himself, literally in a few places, but otherwise I found this book to a treasure trove of useful insights into the lives and behaviors of people who helped mold America's opinion about family, relationships, acceptabilty of an overall lack of moral and ethical behavior all in the name of liberation.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting information, October 2, 2013
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This review is from: Libido Dominandi: Sexual Liberation & Political Control (Paperback)
Historical information about an idea (revolution, liberation, not only sexual) that travelled through time. Recommended for those who want to understand the system.
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Libido Dominandi: Sexual Liberation & Political Control
Libido Dominandi: Sexual Liberation & Political Control by E. Michael Jones (Paperback - April 15, 2005)
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