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Libraries Hardcover – August 20, 2014


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Hardcover, August 20, 2014
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Schirmer/Mosel (August 20, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 3829601867
  • ISBN-13: 978-3829601863
  • Product Dimensions: 12.1 x 9.7 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #115,017 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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See all 10 customer reviews
A picture is worth a thousand words!
Chanley M. Mohney
The snapshot images speak for themselves in this captivating compilation highly recommended for bibliophile's coffee tables and photography shelves.
Midwest Book Review
Her photographs of libraries all the way from USA to Europe amount to beautiful artwork, evoking majesty and history.
B. Wolinsky

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on August 5, 2006
137 color plates distinguish Candida Hofer Libraries, beautifully capturing seats of knowledge around the world from the Pierpont Morgan Library in New York to the Bibliotheque nationale de France in Paris, the Villa Medici in Rome and others. Aside from a brief introduction, no essays intersperse the eye-catching plates, each of which takes up a whole page with a blank page opposite in a two-page spread. The snapshot images speak for themselves in this captivating compilation highly recommended for bibliophile's coffee tables and photography shelves.
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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful By M. V. Hartman on May 4, 2009
I borrowed this book from the library to see if I was willing to spend the money on it. The answer is not quite yet. But nonetheless, it was absolutely gorgeous, and someday it will be in my collection. I'm keeping an eye out for a decent price on a used copy.

The pictures are simply beautiful, and beautifully simple. There were pictures of libraries that I could imagine myself holing up in for days, looking at books, and other libraries that I can imagine just standing in, looking around in awe, unable to read a word.
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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Chanley M. Mohney on April 7, 2008
A picture is worth a thousand words! This book says so much and yet there are only a handful of words on each page identifying the library in the photo. As I was "reading" through this book, I realized that I have been in many of the cities or countries where these libraries are located. I missed some beautiful sites. For anyone who has an interest in libraries, this is a must "read." I will be giving this to my son, who is an architect. His specialty is libraries.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Steven T Johnson on March 11, 2014
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I would not buy this book again. It was as if they were trying to take "art" photos rather than consentrate on the wonderful spaces they were at.
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Hoffer photographs libraries as though she were photographing the inside of a great museum. Her photographs of libraries all the way from USA to Europe amount to beautiful artwork, evoking majesty and history. In a way, old libraries are museums; they were designed to resemble the insides of stately homes, so that whoever paid for them could show how rich and powerful they were. Whether they were built by kings and queens, or by the Medicis, or the Carnegies and Rockefellers, they always have the best when it comes to architecture and décor.
The juxtaposition is clear when it comes to the times. The libraries will either be wood-paneled and luxurious, or the kind of modernist carpeting that would make George Jetson proud. Few of the photos have any people in them, which allows the photographer to concentrate on the interiors. However, I the people who frequent the libraries tell you a lot about their true purpose. Take for example the library on Second Avenue and St. Marks Place in NYC; it’s full of homeless people who sit there all day, and those that aren’t homeless spend all day with their laptops. NYC’s public libraries are a notorious refuge for the homeless, so I wonder if it’s the same with public libraries in London, Paris, and Milan? Do Europeans bring their laptops into the library the way Americans do?
Unfortunately, young people don’t spend as much time in libraries as they used to. Whereas up until perhaps 2004, young people did their research at the library, now they use the internet. They no longer head for the library to do that social studies project, and as a result they don’t discover all those other books they have. It’s a shame that such a great resource is going to waste.
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