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Customer Discussions > Green Eggs and Ham forum

Library Binding Vs. Hardcover


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Showing 1-19 of 19 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jun 23, 2009 12:06:31 PM PDT
On several books I am looking to purchase for my daughter, Amazon lists them as being available in either Hardcover or Library Binding. What is the difference? They don't explain the difference anywhere on the ad. Any insight is appreciated.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 7, 2010 7:56:33 AM PST
The only real notable difference is that Library Bindings are done by a more-or-less independent third-party, whereas a hardcover is issued by the original publisher. Library bindings are more durable, but may not look as nice as proper hardcovers (more utilitarian than decorative), and typically lack dust jackets or anything like that.
In terms of recommendation, I only go for the library binding if a hardcover version is not available. Like I said, it doesn't look as nice, but it's certainly more durable than a paperback.

Posted on Oct 13, 2011 5:17:53 PM PDT
MMM says:
Does the library bound book use the same paper, ink and printing as the hardbound book?
Any elaboration or insight on this subject is welcomed. Thank you so much.

Posted on Feb 9, 2012 11:39:48 AM PST
Ryan says:
Usually library bound books are the paperback equivalent.
The book's spine is kinda heated to melt the glue, the pages removed.
Next the pages are rebound by glue or thread to an empty book cover of equivalent size.
Then they take the cover and slap it on the new book's cover above. It's usually glued on the corners and spine.
Then some protective contact paper or clear sheets are cut to match the book's outside and that's taped around the folds of the book like a normal dustjacket, libraries normally stick any applicable stickers on the spines before they tape the sheets around the book.

For example, I had a 'trade paperback' of the larger yet still paperback version of "Layer Cake" and a comic book trade of a "Batman Begins" adaptation tpb both librarybound from library sales.

Posted on Nov 24, 2013 4:54:58 PM PST
PenB says:
Is it worth getting library bound instead of paperback? Or do you lose something in getting the library bound? Which should I get if I have a collection of a certain author in both hard cover and paperback?

Posted on Jan 20, 2015 8:54:10 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Mar 27, 2015 5:16:32 PM PDT]

Posted on Feb 2, 2015 2:38:39 PM PST
Mudge says:
how do you know if a book is library or hardback binding.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 27, 2015 9:57:49 AM PDT
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Posted on Apr 16, 2015 1:13:30 AM PDT
Publisher bindings are pretty. Library bindings last longer under the hard wear and tear that is typical of a library book. Also library bound books will open flat to the end of the page, allowing easy photocopying. Library bindings are performed by a handful of library binders who remove the original publisher's binding and replace it with a standardized (search: LIBRARY BINDING INSTITUTE), sturdy binding. The materials and techniques used are tightly controlled. I wish Amazon would provide pictures of each edition so we could see before we buy, but you can always return it.

Posted on Aug 13, 2015 1:55:06 AM PDT
It seems to me that the key distinction between hard and paper bindings is actually the quality of the paper the pages are printed on.

Paper bound books seem to brown more quickly than hard backed books.

So, unfortunately a library bound book remains a paper back and while it shouldn't fall aback as quickly as a paper back, may
brown more quickly than a hardback.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 7, 2015 10:51:41 AM PDT
Emma Schwab says:
I bought one of Brian Jacques Redwall series books in Library binding mostly because I wasn't familiar with that binding technique. I could tell from the description that it was a hard cover book, but I couldn't see why it was several dollars less than the regular hard covers. Upon arrival I was surprised to receive a paperback sized hard cover. After getting over the original surprise I, personally, really like it and am now seeking to replace my whole Redwall collection in library bound books.

From what I understand about the library binding process, a 3rd party takes a paperback book and carefully melts the glue and removes the cover. The pages are then rebound with thread and/or glue and put in a hard cover. To me, it feels like the best of both worlds: all the durability and resilience of a hard cover book but the size of a paper back (less room taken up on my already over burdened book shelves!)

Posted on Dec 29, 2015 4:57:55 PM PST
Gardyloo says:
I frequently use a small town independent library that takes donations from readers to use in the library. It seems the donated books don't hold up as well as the versions at the big county library. Are books easily obtainable from Amazon in a library binding so it'll last after I donate it for use?

Posted on Dec 31, 2015 12:42:19 PM PST
Gallimaufry says:
Hardcover books are more likely to have been printed on longer-lasting acid-free paper. The cheap paper of paperback books becomes yellow and brittle much sooner.

In reply to an earlier post on May 6, 2016 7:31:52 AM PDT
That makes sense. I recently purchased a hard cover edition of a graphic novel that was a former library book. The inner edges of the pages were partially obscured, likely due to melting of the glue.

In reply to an earlier post on May 6, 2016 7:38:29 AM PDT
If you use Google to search for "turtleback binding," you will find pictures of examples.

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2016 5:25:52 AM PDT
Biblio Ninja says:
Library binding is the method of binding serials, and re-binding paperback or hardcover books, for use within libraries. Library binding increases the durability of books, as well as making the materials easier to use. The stiffening process is a low-cost, in-house alternative to library binding of paperbacks.Library binding is a way to increase the life of books and periodicals used in libraries. This is done by sewing the pages in place and by reinforcing the spine for each volume. The goal of library binding is long-term preservation. However, library bound books also benefit library patrons by ensuring that the volume in hand is complete, opened with ease, and easy to photocopy.Most library binders use a method of bookbinding called oversewing to secure the volumes. Oversewing involves cutting or milling off the spines of the volumes, creating a block of loose pages. Then the loose sheets are combined into small units or signatures, which are secured with overlock stitching. The separate signatures then get sewn together, creating a single book block. Often a piece of linen is glued to the book block spine for further support. The spine of the volume sometimes is rounded and backed to keep the spine from caving in.

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2016 5:26:45 AM PDT
Biblio Ninja says:
Most library binders use a method of bookbinding called oversewing to secure the volumes. Oversewing involves cutting or milling off the spines of the volumes, creating a block of loose pages. Then the loose sheets are combined into small units or signatures, which are secured with overlock stitching. The separate signatures then get sewn together, creating a single book block. Often a piece of linen is glued to the book block spine for further support. The spine of the volume sometimes is rounded and backed to keep the spine from caving in.

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2016 5:27:35 AM PDT
Biblio Ninja says:
Most library binders use a method of bookbinding called oversewing to secure the volumes. Oversewing involves cutting or milling off the spines of the volumes, creating a block of loose pages. Then the loose sheets are combined into small units or signatures, which are secured with overlock stitching. The separate signatures then get sewn together, creating a single book block. Often a piece of linen is glued to the book block spine for further support. The spine of the volume sometimes is rounded and backed to keep the spine from caving in.

In reply to an earlier post on May 24, 2016 5:30:59 AM PDT
Biblio Ninja says:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VSsk9RnaJhc
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Discussion in:  Green Eggs and Ham forum
Participants:  15
Total posts:  19
Initial post:  Jun 23, 2009
Latest post:  May 24, 2016

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Green Eggs and Ham (Dr.Seuss Classic Collection)
Green Eggs and Ham (Dr.Seuss Classic Collection) by Dr. Seuss (Paperback - November 6, 1995)
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