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Licence To Kill (Soundtrack)

October 2, 2012 | Format: MP3

$5.00
Also available in CD Format
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
5:14
30
2
3:53
30
3
3:45
30
4
3:50
30
5
3:58
30
6
3:53
30
7
3:26
30
8
2:05
30
9
6:02
30
10
9:10
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: March 4, 2002
  • Release Date: October 2, 2012
  • Label: Geffen
  • Copyright: (C) 1989 Geffen Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 45:16
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B009IPZNAK
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars 30 customer reviews
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,256 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on April 19, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Another Bond soundtrack lacking half of the film's music, but do we actually miss anything? I think not. Michael Kamen, who replaces John Barry who was seriously ill at the time, does some nice work, but is this Bond music? Not quite. Although Kamen uses the JB007 theme every sixty seconds, you can't help feeling that you're just listening to another dull action movie soundtrack - not James Bond. The music works fine still, the track "Pam" is really good (though some amateur did the strange cuttings troughout), and finally a 007 soundtrack to include the gunbarrel music. If you are a Bond music fan, buy it, because it still beats the hell out of David Arnold.
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Format: Audio CD
Michael Kamen composed a competent score for "Licence to Kill." Of the "non-John Barry" scores on CD, this my second favorite after the issue of David Arnold's stand-alone score for "Tomorrow Never Dies."
Kamen once again demonstrates his ability to score with great power and strength as he did in "Die Hard." "James & Felix on Their Way to Church" is a tour de force of Kamen's ability to unleash the dynamic energy of the orchestra.
However, the score as heard in the film is a major disappointment for several reasons. It actually seems to lack power and energy and sounds somewhat diluted. It is also has a very lethargic and dreary quality about it. "Licence to Kill" is not an uplifting film, but the score spirals it into an even deeper abyss of despair from which it never ascends once Bond arrives in Isthmus City. Only some action scenes bring the score out of the doldrums, but it never recovers from its shroud-like gloom.
His interpretation of "The James Bond Theme" is inaccurate in many scenes. No, I am not saying that he got the notes wrong. In fact, he interpolated the theme throughout the film changing or eliminating notes here and there putting his own stamp on it. No, I am not referring to that either. What is inaccurate is giving "The James Bond Theme" a Latin sound via playing the familiar chords on a Spanish acoustic guitar.
This is similar to the mistake George Martin made with his score for "Live and Let Die." George Martin did not give us a Bond score. Being influenced by the "Black Film" genre of the early 70s Martin delivered a score akin to "Shaft." Given the subject and cast of villains in "Live and Let Die" that approach may have worked for major parts of the score.
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Comment 10 of 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Audio CD
The soundtrack for Licence To Kill is a curiosity worth having. The title theme, which sounds like Shirley Bassey's Goldfinger at the beginning, is surprisingly good, and rates among the better title songs. "Wedding Party" and "Dirty Love" are throw-aways, I always skip them when I listen to the CD. "Pam" really is a beautiful track, Michael Kamen (the composer) really shines here. Next is the love track "If you asked me to" which is OK, but to me seems to have aged in the 15 years since it was released. The rest of the songs on the CD are from the score from Licence To Kill. They are nowhere near matching John Barry's talent, but manage to conjure up some tension. On track 6, "James and Felix on Their Way to Church," is the gunbarrel, which is one of the better ones. Unfortunately the pre-title sequence that follows is spread over 4 tracks which really is a pain, because you have to use the search function on your CD player to find the music you're after!!! The best of the tracks on the latter half of the CD is by far "Licence Revoked" as it acts as a musical suite to the movie and contains the James Bond theme.
Overall, this soundtrack is worthwhile, but is missing alot of music. It has some great tracks like "Pam" and "Licence Revoked" and is a must in your Bond collection, or, if you are into film music, you should also have a listen!!!
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Format: Audio CD
John Barry was originally scheduled to do the music for "Licence to Kill" (1989), but illness prevented him from this task. Instead, the eleventh hour assignment fell to Michale Kamen, who had produced a number of action scores of his own. The title was performed by Gladys Knight, and reminds one a bit of "Goldfinger" which is not surprising given the credits: Narada Michael Walden, Jeffrey Cohen, Walter "Baby Love" Afanasieff, John Barry and Anthony Newley. Despite being a song by committee, it works fairly well. The score, by Kamen, is a worthy effort. It certainly works to accentuate particular scenes in the film, and does have its moments. A love theme, the music for part of the pre-title sequence, and the climax are all notable. Still, taken as a whole, it is clear that this soundtrack was not what was originally hoped for.
Comment 3 of 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Audio CD
When "The Living Daylights" emerged as composer John Barry's 007 swan song, the long-running film series took a nosedive in the scoring department. Incredibly enough, Michael Kamen's music for "Licence to Kill" (1989) proved less memorable than the erratic Michel Legrand score in "Never Say Never Again." Even the traditional James Bond Theme lacked punch. Gladys Knight's excellent title song and Patti LaBelle's superior ballad "If You Asked Me To" outstripped Kamen's bland orchestrations. The Barry touch was sorely missed.
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