Customer Reviews

150
4.5 out of 5 stars
Lies: A Gone Novel
Format: HardcoverChange
Price:$14.15 + Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
It has been seven months since all the adults disappeared and all the children under 15 are still struggling with life in the FAYZ. Hunger is an ever present problem, kids are getting drunk and smoking and carrying weapons. Some are trying to set authority with a Town Council; others aren't above violence and destruction to get their way. As Sam and Astrid fight (sometimes with each other) to do the right thing they are also dealing with the so-called prophetess who is saying death is the way to escape the FAYZ. On top of that Sam and others think they see Drake the dreaded Whip Hand, but he's dead - isn't he?

"Lies" is the exciting third book in Michael Grant's thrilling "Gone" series for young adults (the first two books are Gone and Hunger: A Gone Novel). Grant has managed to keep the tension throughout the series and you feel that the kids (some of whom are oh so young) as many struggle to do the right thing - not all agree on what the right thing is. While it is easy to feel sorry for Sam as he tries to lead those who don't necessarily want a leader and Astrid who is beginning to realize she is not always right, it is Mary who I felt the most sorry for as she has to decide whether or not to "poof" when she turns 15. This is not an easy decision for Mary - she is tired of taking care of the "littles" yet wonders who'll take care of them if she does disappear. Grant fills the book with many other memorable characters (for better or worse) including Orsay and Nerezza, Lana, Zil, Caine, Sanjit, Brianna, Dekka, Brittney, and more.

The Gone series reminds me a lot of a Stephen King type series for young adults and never more so than with this book which reminds me a lot of King's Under the Dome: A Novel. It is interesting to see what two authors do with a similar concept. There is a lot of good versus evil in both books and lots of destruction. Without giving anything away I do think Grant came up with a better explanation of what caused the FAYZ then King did with his dome. Grant gives readers just enough glimpses of life beyond the FAYZ to make readers wonder who among the children is doing the right thing - it will be interesting to see how Grant deals with the ramifications of the actions of all those living in the FAYZ - both the "good guys" and the "bad guys".

"Lies" is another excellent entry in Michael Grant's thrilling "Gone" series.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Format: Hardcover
Welcome back to Perdido Beach, back to the FAYZ. Welcome indeed. Lies has been a long time coming, it truly has.

Michael Grant's latest offering, Lies, mirrors his previous hits, Gone and Hunger, in every way possible. Grant doesn't hold back; from page one the action steams out of the station and the plot unravels in so many twists, turns and flips. No time wasting. Like a Ninja Assassin: get in there, stab-slash-slice, get out. Mission accomplished.

His prose mimics the rapid, staccato bursts of machine guns. When you open Lies, his prose flips out like an impressive cut-throat razor and slices away all distractions that might steal your attention from the book.

The question is: how good an accomplishment is Lies?

If you're a fan of the Gone series, the first thing you'll notice when reading Lies is the absence of some beloved characters. Computer Jack appears only twice. Quinn becomes more irrelevant than he was in Hunger. Lana sits around, getting high on alcohol and smoking cigarettes, all the time. Brianna, the character I love most, contributes zilch to the plot; she's sick the entire book, suffering from the flu, thus bedridden. The only time she does anything is towards the end, when she puts Sam on a skateboard and drags him at top speed from the nuclear plant back to Perdido Beach.

Huh.

Why are these top characters sidelined? Well, the only reason I supply is: to make room for newer characters.

Problem is the new characters are either bad imitations of the old, popular characters, or they are just not that interesting.

Nerezza channels Diana's manipulative, sultry disposition with little success. Zil, who assumes the mantle of resident villain, as Caine is too busy starving to death, is too weak, too stupid, and too WTF-are-you-kidding-me, that the plausibility of Lies' plot scuttles off a cliff when Zil and his human crew burn down half the town (killing some kids in the process), walk into a hall filled with kids without incurring retribution for starting the fire, and gun down a bunch of kids.

Maybe this is the author's idea of a badass villain, in which case: fail.

Then there're Sanjit, Virtue and the other kids who live on an island within the FAYZ. These guys are late to the party. In the first book they would have made for interesting characters. In Lies, they just get in the way. I'm reading an action scene, the chapter ends, and then I have to read Sanjit and Virtue's boring mission to fly a helicopter. They accomplish this at the end of the book.

Yes, that's right. It takes the entire book for them to fly a helicopter.

Fortunately, Sam, Astrid, Orc, and Howard breathe a much needed life into Lies.

Sam struggles to accept his relegated hero status, labours with the memory of Drake beating the crap out of him, and questions his relationship with Astrid: has she been using him all along just to protect herself and her brother, Little Pete? Does she love him or is she only interested in power and control?

Astrid misplaces that astute perception of hers, the one that earned her the fitting moniker, "Astrid the genius", in her quest to maintain peace, order and unity within the FAYZ.

Orc, though playing a much smaller role like Computer Jack, becomes a more honourable individual. Even Howard shows he's got a streak of humanity in him and that he's not simply a brainless, smart-mouthed bully. He totally pawns Astrid at her own game. Yeah, he is still a creep, but he's a far more interesting creep in this book than in the previous ones.

I have to say though that the character over-inflation problem that plagued Hunger is evident in Lies. In fact, most characters are starting to sound alike that it's hard to distinguish them.

What I don't understand is why the author chooses to give characters staring roles when they add nothing to the plot or the series. There are a bunch of chapters that feature Justin. Yeah, you probably don't remember him. Well, that's because he's very irrelevant. But for some reason we have to read chapters of him getting lost on his way home. That's all. What's the point?

There is a saying that goes: if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

I said earlier that Lies mirrors Gone and Hunger in every way possible, but is that necessarily a good thing?

Every series has a plot formula. In Harry Potter, Harry starts off each book at his uncle's house. Weird things happen. Then he goes to Hogwarts. Weird things happen. Everyone blames him. Weird things happen. He, Hermione and Ron solve some weird riddles. They succeed. Hurray! Harry returns home. That's pretty much the Potter formula. The reason it works is (a) there's always something new to discover in Hogwarts; (b) Harry Potter and other characters are very, very well drawn; (c) the plot elements for each book are always fresh, engaging and exciting [book one: philosopher's stone; book two: the basilisk/sword of Gryffindor; book three: Dementors/time-turner; book four: tri-wizard tournament/voldemort himself; etc].

The Gone series has its own formula. Unfortunately, that formula is starting to show its age.

As usual, Caine concocts a half-arsed plan and manipulates a bunch of people. The heroes are too busy squabbling amongst themselves to open their eyes and see what's right in front of them. By the time they realise, oh, crap there's something bad happening, it's too late - Caine has done his damage.

Lies' plot does deliver, but honestly, each book release in the Gone series has shown a progressive decline in plot quality. The new characters - heroes and villains alike - are unable to fill the void left by absentee characters. (Seriously, can someone tell me why Zil is still alive?) The author must know this, which is why he decided to bring back an old character that should have stayed dead. It's like a bad episode of Passions. Said character used to be scary. Now he's a joke.

Finally:

I know Little Pete is an autistic four-year-old, and I sympathise with him. Actually, I used to. Now, he's just pissing me off. He's responsible for the FAYZ, or at least he's somehow connected, but his unresponsiveness, while realistic, is aggravating, especially since his character is pivotal in the series. It takes forever for him to react to anything, and when he does, I'm thinking: oh, wow. That's it? That's all you're going to do after I've sat here for hours, reading about you whine and play a dead Game Boy?

Overall, Lies is a decent book. Certainly not my best in the series. Here is to hoping things pick up in Plague.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Format: Paperback
They've survived Caine. They've survived Drake. They've even survived Hunger. They've even survived the big poof when the big 15 came around. But wait, now Orsay is saying that the big poof is really an escape to the outside. Its a way out. She said she seen it, in dreams. That when she's close enough to the wall of the dome, she sees the dreams of the parents, waiting just outside of the dome. For them, their kids. And they've been waiting, watching, building Carl Jr's and hotels to occupy them while they wait. There are new's cameras and trucks and people everywhere, so many people.... But then there's the girl Nerezza. No one remembers her from before. I mean, that's not in itself all too suspicious, there are so many kids. But she has attached herself to Orsay, calling her the Prophetess, daring anyone to disbelieve her. Astrid does. She says Orsay is a liar. And tells the Council to spread it. If people start stepping out, it would be like wilfully committing suicide, which is a sin. Its for their own good. But where do the lies begin and end? Is Orsay really seeing the outside world? Or is it just another illusion in a world full of illusions?
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon November 30, 2010
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
I can't help but think of this book as Lord of the Flies on steroids. It's like driving by a car wreck - you can't help but look.

Don't get me wrong. I really like this series. Grant writes an engrossing page-turner. I was on the edge of my seat and could hardly put the book down. His characters are well developed, if frightening. You can't help put care for and sympathize with the "good guys" and shiver, perhaps shrink away from the "bad guys."

Lies is the third in this series, following Gone and Hunger. Plague is scheduled for release in April of 2011. Nothing is ever easy in the FAYZ. The residents barely survive one threat before facing another one. In this latest installment, people thought dead now walk the streets, the non-freaks (Grant's terminology, not mine) are beginning to resent the Freaks (those with strange powers), and what little semblance of order there was from the establishment of the Town Council quickly evaporates. Zil, leader of the Human Crew sets fire to the town in an attempt to take power away from the mutants (freaks). Osray, now labeled the Prophetess by her strange new companion Nerezza, seems to be telling the children they should embrace the "poof" or maybe even death as a way to escape the FAYZ. As tempers flare, people go hungry and the evil darkness threatens to return (if it ever really left), Sam, Astrid, Edilio and the others must find a way to survive. And even if they survive what will they be facing next?

I can't wait for the next installment.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 16, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Old enemies return and new threats emerge is this thrilling third installment to the Gone Series. Orsay claims that freedom is waiting on the other side of the 'poof'. If kids will only choose to 'step out' on their fifteenth birthdays they'll be returned to the real world and the loving arms of their families. But is she telling the truth? Sam, feeling constricted by the ineffectual council, decides to take off at the worst possible time as Zil takes his fight against the 'freaks' to a whole new level. Astrid finds herself caught up in the middle of a war. Cain and his crew head for what they hope is salvation, if the island Bug has promised them is real they just might find it. If not, none them may have the strength to make it back to Perdido Beach. And who is Nerezza, the strange girl nobody ever seems to remember having seen before?

Lies is a gripping read from its strange beginning to its shocking end. The problem of a food shortage has been lessened thanks to Quinn and Hunter, but with one problem handled, a dozen more emerge. Fires, gunfights, and the walking dead are only some of the dangers lurking around every corner. Can the kids of Perdido Beach survive yet another calamity, or will the darkness win? In this fascinating tale of desperation and madness, it's impossible to guess what will happen next.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 20, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Lies is another brilliant addition to the Gone series, keeping up with the fast-paced action, intensity and all out anarchy of the first two. But with new enemies, new problems and a new level of terror, Lies has taken it's place as my favorite of the three so far.

The character's fear of their impending doom is very well progressed. The riots and hatefulness of the children is really cranked up with the separation of the superhuman kids and the humans. Solid relationships, such as Sam and Astrid's, finally crack under pressure and despite how much I love those two, I was relieved to see their perfect bubble finally pop.

With the main plot of the last book being the children's need for food, this book revolves around the flaws and imperfections of the newly dubbed council, which spotlights on Astrid. I was so happy to see her portrayed in a new light; not the genius that she's made out to be.

Overall, Lies sits wonderfully after the first and second book. It's danger's lie more on personalities in this book, but the gasp-worthy action and plot turns will have you on the edge of your seat. If you're a fan of the Gone series, I definitely recommend you pick this one up!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on June 22, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
The setting for Lies makes this book tricky to enjoy - a major battle has been won, but Grant still wants the series to continue, thusly much of the plot is more of a 'evil has survived' kind of twisted exploration of the FAYZ rather than the outright action.

Emotional drama abounds in Lies, luckily Grant knows when to ease onto the breaks and no particular character dominates page time with teenage angst.

As usual for this series, people get hurt, tortured and manipulated ruthlessly and ending is particularly intense. My major complaint is that Caine's story becomes a little boring as we essentially learn about his team switching locations for their base.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on August 5, 2010
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
I've seen other reviewers compare Michael Grant's series to a modern day "Lord of the Flies" and I couldn't agree more.

I'm close to retirement age but read all genres including teen fiction. This series is wonderful. The kids are so real - the situation they face so outlandish -but it all works.

"Lies" was particularly enjoyable. Our heros/heroines aren't perfect people and think by lying, they are, in effect, controlling a uncontrollable situation. This backfires on them as do the lies realworld politicians use to "control the people."
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 26, 2012
Format: Paperback
Lies is the third book of the Gone series. So, just let me start off saying that if you didn't read the first two books, you won't really understand this book. So far, this was my favorite one in the series. This book is full of so many twists and turns, you always wonder, what's going to happen next? Along with the old characters, new characters appear in this one. The stress and tension in Lies bring out the beautiful plot. Full of action and excitment, this book deserves 5 stars.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format: Hardcover
I read the first 6 books of this series back to back and barely slept. This series will take you on a freaking thriller ride that will make you think hard about life, choices and really what's important. Wow can't say enough that this one is total fantasy enjoyment.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
Hunger: A Gone Novel
Hunger: A Gone Novel by Michael Grant (Paperback - April 8, 2014)
$9.63

Fear: A Gone Novel
Fear: A Gone Novel by Michael Grant (Paperback - April 8, 2014)
$9.70

Plague: A Gone Novel
Plague: A Gone Novel by Michael Grant (Paperback - April 8, 2014)
$9.63
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.