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Note: Amazon first made Series 3&4 available via streaming (free for Prime members) several months ago, and another fan of the series made it known to me that Series One and Two are now available via streaming (free for Prime members).

Kevin Whately, the consummate actor who portrayed Chief Inspector Morse's (John Thaw) long-suffering Detective Sergeant Lewis on "Inspector Morse", is now Detective Inspector Lewis in "Inspector Lewis", a high quality investigative drama set in the academic town of Oxford, England.

Having watched all of the Inspector Morse episodes, I can see the evolution of Lewis' character (brilliantly portrayed by Kevin Whately) from a diligent albeit lowly sergeant under the guidance of the amazing Chief Inspector Morse (John Thaw) to a confident, outspoken, yet still down to earth DI who now has his own underling in the form of the intellectual, gifted DS Hathaway (Lawrence Fox).

Season 2 of Inspector Lewis is quite an engaging series, containing many interesting episodes featuring DI Lewis (Kevin Whately) and DS Hathaway (Lawrence Fox). Part of what makes Insp. Lewis a charming series for me is the banter between Lewis and the more cerebral, Cambridge-educated (in theology), Hathaway. There's lots to satisfy the discerning viewer in Season 2 - picturesque Oxford, literary references, and riveting plots, not to mention the excellent ensemble cast.
Season 2 contains the following episodes:

And The Moonbeams Kiss the Sea - One of my favorites of all the Lewis episodes. This is not only well-written, but is also atmospheric. Lewis and Hathaway try to discover the link between two murders. One is of a maintenance worker at Oxford's Bodleain Library, and the other is of a popular art student. As they dig deeper, they find out that the two deaths are related to some high level forgery involving works of the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Oxford dons addicted to gambling.

Music to Die For - Whilst investigating the murder of an elderly gay lecturer, Lewis finds connections to the world of underground amateur boxing, the East German Secret Police (Stasi), and even Lewis' old mentor Morse. Poor Lewis gets sort of entangled with a beautiful German, but are her motives purely romantic?

Life Born of Fire - The death of a gay student, gay bashing, and college politics get to Hathaway since the dead student also happened to be Hathaway's friend and former classmate. There are some truly strange twists in this one.

The Great and the Good - An intriguing episode. A young girl Beatrice is found drugged and a victim of rape, and evidence points to a certain Oswald Cooper, who himself ends up garrotted and castrated. The question is: who is the killer and what is the motive?

Allegory of Love - A mysterious young woman is found killed, the weapon being an antique Persian mirror. This resembles a scene found in a historical novel written by up and coming Oxford author, Dorian Crane. Then another young woman is threatened, leading Lewis and Hathaway on a desperate search for the truth.

The Quality of Mercy - death and Shakespeare meet when the actor playing the role of Shylock in The Merchant of Venice is found murdered. When another murder occurs, Lewis and Hathaway find their hands full as the list of suspects gets longer.

The Point of Vanishing - Curious case of a man killed in his own bathtub.

I'd recommend the Inspector Lewis series to any fan of quality British crime procedurals.
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on March 2, 2014
I've been watching this series from the beginning, but watching it again has shown me things I missed the first time around. In other words, it's worth watching more than once, which can't be said about many series.
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on March 4, 2012
If you love a good mystery with interesting characters and lots of twisty plots then these are for you. These are only bested by Misummer Murder Mysteries. I love the wonderful stories, beautiful English landscapes, lilting accents and intriguing whodunits. Only for the true mystery fan!
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on August 26, 2012
In my opinion nobody does mystery and crime better than the British. Lewis is right up there with the best of them: Lynley, Havers, Wexler, Morse, Daziel & Pasco, etc, etc. etc. Lewis and Hathaway are a thoroughly enjoyable and a less acerbic team than were Inspector Morse and the then Sergeant Lewis but the stories are intelligent and almost as twisty as they were in Morse's day. I enjoy the compassion and humor between Lewis and Hathaway and the two make a good team. I look forward to every episode and hope the series continues for a long time to come.
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on February 28, 2014
This series is another one from England that tells a good story, well written interesting. I personally love that about BBC films the English definitely know how to tell a good story. The actors are not all beautiful and handsome they are more like everyone.
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on February 28, 2014
This is a successful continuation of the Inspector Morse series. Kevin Whaley is terrific. He was terrific as Morse's sergeant and he's terrific as a DI. Laurence Fox is equally good as Lewis' sergeant.
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on April 20, 2015
I am currently watching this series and have now watched the first and second seasons and am into the third season. This is every bit as good as the Morse series and possibley slightly better. The inner action between the two actors of Lewis and Hathaway is enjoyable, I even laugh outloud now and then as they jab fun at each other. The location at Oxford is also a plus for enjoyment, the churches and libraries, everywhere you look is history. If you love mysteries, excellent acting and a good story, Inspector Lewis will not disappoint.
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on April 30, 2015
Lewis and Hathaway continue their subtle, droll, humorous interplay while solving multiple murders in every episode. The series does a great job of creating misdirection, so you are always suspicious of someone who ends up being innocent. The on screen chemistry between Laurence Fox and Kevin Whately makes every episode worth it. The secondary characters are also really well acted, and most of the time the guest stars are top notch British actors you recognize from other British shows.
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on April 19, 2016
A review for all seasons offered with Amazon Prime:
Kevin Whately and Laurence Fox offer one a combination that is an interesting study in personality types . . . good combination. They offset each other to perfection. Add Clare Holman for the romantic interest and one finds an exceptional cast.

I started with the first season and ended with season eight . . . the multiple faceted personalities develop over this time line as do the plots. Interesting and filled with twists and turns that encourage one to think . . . not just guess! Definitely worthy of Masterpiece Mystery!
Unlike some, I enjoyed D. I. Lewis's off the wall character . . . great counterfoil to Hathaway's classical education. Laura adds the 'what next' for romance . . . over dead bodies, at that!

I enjoyed the series and would recommend it for those with an interest in this genre . . . technically, it is reasonably accurate!

[Viewed with Kindle 10.1 . . . smooth streaming with crisp audio.]
hs
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Kevin Whately, the consummate actor who portrayed Chief Inspector Morse's (John Thaw) long-suffering Detective Sergeant Lewis on "Inspector Morse", is now Detective Inspector Lewis in "Inspector Lewis", a high quality investigative drama set in the academic town of Oxford, England.

Having watched all of the Inspector Morse episodes, I can see the evolution of Lewis' character (brilliantly portrayed by Kevin Whately) from a diligent albeit lowly sergeant under the guidance of the amazing Chief Inspector Morse (John Thaw) to a confident, outspoken, yet still down to earth DI who now has his own underling in the form of the intellectual, gifted DS Hathaway (Lawrence Fox).

Season 2 of Inspector Lewis is quite an engaging series, containing many interesting episodes featuring DI Lewis (Kevin Whately) and DS Hathaway (Lawrence Fox). Part of what makes Insp. Lewis a charming series for me is the banter between Lewis and the more cerebral, Cambridge-educated (in theology), Hathaway. There's lots to satisfy the discerning viewer in Season 2 - picturesque Oxford, literary references, and riveting plots, not to mention the excellent ensemble cast.
Season 2 contains the following episodes:

And The Moonbeams Kiss the Sea - One of my favorites of all the Lewis episodes. This is not only well-written, but is also atmospheric. Lewis and Hathaway try to discover the link between two murders. One is of a maintenance worker at Oxford's Bodleain Library, and the other is of a popular art student. As they dig deeper, they find out that the two deaths are related to some high level forgery involving works of the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Oxford dons addicted to gambling.

Music to Die For - Whilst investigating the murder of an elderly gay lecturer, Lewis finds connections to the world of underground amateur boxing, the East German Secret Police (Stasi), and even Lewis' old mentor Morse. Poor Lewis gets sort of entangled with a beautiful German, but are her motives purely romantic?

Life Born of Fire - The death of a gay student, gay bashing, and college politics get to Hathaway since the dead student also happened to be Hathaway's friend and former classmate. There are some truly strange twists in this one.

The Great and the Good - An intriguing episode. A young girl Beatrice is found drugged and a victim of rape, and evidence points to a certain Oswald Cooper, who himself ends up garrotted and castrated. The question is: who is the killer and what is the motive?

Allegory of Love - A mysterious young woman is found killed, the weapon being an antique Persian mirror. This resembles a scene found in a historical novel written by up and coming Oxford author, Dorian Crane. Then another young woman is threatened, leading Lewis and Hathaway on a desperate search for the truth.

The Quality of Mercy - death and Shakespeare meet when the actor playing the role of Shylock in The Merchant of Venice is found murdered. When another murder occurs, Lewis and Hathaway find their hands full as the list of suspects gets longer.

The Point of Vanishing - Curious case of a man killed in his own bathtub.

I'd recommend the Inspector Lewis series to any fan of quality British crime procedurals.
0Comment|3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

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