Life of Pi 2012 PG CC

Amazon Instant Video

(3,389) IMDb 8/10
Available in HD
Watch Trailer

Embark on the adventure of a lifetime in this visual masterpiece from Oscar winner Ang Lee*, based on the best-selling novel. After a cataclysmic shipwreck, an Indian boy named Pi finds himself stranded on a lifeboat with a ferocious Bengal tiger. Together, they face nature's majestic grandeur and fury on an epic journey of discovery.

Starring:
Suraj Sharma, Irrfan Khan
Runtime:
2 hours 7 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Life of Pi

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Drama, Adventure
Director Ang Lee
Starring Suraj Sharma, Irrfan Khan
Supporting actors Ayush Tandon, Gautam Belur, Adil Hussain, Tabu, Ayaan Khan, Mohd. Abbas Khaleeli, Vibish Sivakumar, Rafe Spall, Gérard Depardieu, James Saito, Jun Naito, Andrea Di Stefano, Shravanthi Sainath, Elie Alouf, Padmini Ramachandran, T.M. Karthik, Amarendran Ramanan, Hari Mina Bala
Studio Fox
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Life of Pi is beautifully filmed and great work on making the tiger look 'real'!
M. Link
The acting was amazing, the special effects were great and the overall story was very entertaining.
Seth
If you like Stories that make you think, or potentially a feel good movie, this is one for you.
Edward G. Pope

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

628 of 710 people found the following review helpful By Susan Tunis TOP 500 REVIEWER on November 15, 2012
Format: DVD
Wow, this has been an exciting fall for literary adaptations! I read Yann Martel's Life of Pi a decade ago and thought it was fantastic storytelling. I cheered when it won the Man Booker Prize. So, I was quite excited to attend an advance screening recently with several members of my book group. I remembered the novel quite well in broad strokes, but not the fine detail. I didn't refresh my memory before watching the film, but was curious enough to reread Life of Pi in its entirety before writing this review. The film is very true to the novel in spirit and tone, but there are small changes, additions (generally positive), and elisions (some noteworthy).

The film opens similarly to the novel. The idea is the same, but the execution is slightly different. Different mediums require different storytelling tools. For instance, I believe most film-goers will readily recognize The Writer (portrayed by actor Rafe Spall, who replaced a distractingly famous Toby Maguire) as a stand-in for author Martel. In the novel, it is Martel himself, in direct address to readers, who fulfills this role, effectively blurring the line between fact and fiction. It is established that this story is being related to The Writer by an older Pi. From there, readers are introduced to a young Piscine Molitor Patel and the world he inhabits. It's a charmed childhood, being raised at the Pondicherry Zoo amongst a loving family and exotic animals--an Indian "We Bought a Zoo." These scenes are as lush and colorful as any Bollywood musical.

I've discussed this novel with other readers countless times over the years. It's beloved by many, but truly hated by a vocal minority. I've never understood the vitriol, personally. Martel writes beautifully and accessibly.
Read more ›
48 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
78 of 86 people found the following review helpful By Robert Blenheim on February 22, 2013
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Ang Lee's "Life of Pi" is a masterpiece with some of the most beautiful and unforgettable images ever displayed on film. Not only did it give me an experience of the wonder in being alive while moving me to tears, but its story also encompassed a human life from childhood to mature age while dealing with pain and guilt that are part of the human experience.

Ang Lee isn't thought of as an Asian auteur in the class of Wong Kar-wai, Zhang Yimou or Lee Chang-dong. He's actually more of a commercial director than a personal artist, but what he does in transferring the "Life of Pi" from novel to screen is miraculous. Perhaps no director has ever captured the beauty and fear of the power of life, and when you look deep into the eyes of the tiger "Richard Parker", you see what Marlowe saw in Kurtz's eyes in Conrad's "The Heart of Darkness": a power so vast it dwarfs you with an awareness of your mortality, showing you your insignificance beside the powers of all life. What Ang Lee does here in this film will, I believe, remain his tour-de-force, and is a work of art I will come to many times in the future.

The acting is wonderful, primarily Irrfan Khan, one of India's greatest actors who plays the adult Pi. Khan provides an entire acting course just in the way he uses his face, displaying a smile in the film's climax that rivals the Mona Lisa's in its ambiguity. You see the world of pain, guilt, joy and sadness in his delicate expression.

The film is supremely spiritual in every frame, yet, if one is paying attention, it winds up as somewhat of a Trojan Horse in what it ultimate reveals about religion. I'm trying hard not to provide a spoiler here, but there are five words spoken by the adult Pi at the end of the film that viewers seem to miss that spell it out.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
237 of 276 people found the following review helpful By Steve D. Heckenlively on December 12, 2012
Format: DVD
This may be the hardest movie review I've ever written, somehow words don't
express it quite right ...

To begin, I saw Life of Pi in 3-D. A week later I went back and saw it again,
because I don't foresee having another chance. I expect the color and detail
will remain gorgeous in 2-D, and I definitely intend to buy the disc.

However the 3-D in this movie is spectacular. The tiger, Richard Parker, is
at the top of the list, but in fact the entire movie benefits tremendously
from 3-D. If you liked Avatar, you probably liked the marvelous animals.
And I'm sure in some scenes, Richard Parker is CGI'd to some extent. But
Life of Pi has a real earthly animal to work with, and you can argue there
is no animal on earth more beautiful or fierce than a tiger. That's part
of the genius of this movie, and I'm sure one reason James Cameron liked
it so much.

That brings me to another point about this movie, its suitability for kids.
Hopefully by now you understand the tiger is not a cuddly pet. Its very much
a wild animal, just like you can see in nature videos. Except in this movie
the tiger is a lot closer. He wants to eat Pi. Pi can't always see the tiger.
The audience knows the tiger is going to try something, but that just makes it
all the more nerve-wracking. Or exciting, depending on the person watching.
This movie made me jump several times, and I was often clutching the arms of
my chair. Its pretty intense in places. More so the second time I saw it.
I kid you not.
Read more ›
17 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again