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Life And Work Of Sigmund Freud (Pelican biographies) Paperback – Abridged, International Edition


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Product Details

  • Series: Pelican biographies
  • Paperback: 672 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin UK; Abridged edition (January 7, 1964)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140206612
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140206616
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,218,539 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Steven H Propp TOP 100 REVIEWER on August 18, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Alfred Ernest Jones (1879-1958) was a Welsh psychoanalyst, and close associate of Sigmund Freud. While this account was written by a committed Freudian (and one who actively worked to exclude Jung from Frued), it is nevertheless filled with insights and details that are essential to a knowledge of Freud. Jones includes in detail (throughout all three volumes) Freud's life and works, of course, but the real value of Jones' book is the detail of the record given, and Jones' own insightful comments.

For example, "Freud took elaborate measures to secure his privacy, especially concerning his early life. On two occasions he completely destroyed all his correspondence, notes, diaries, and manuscripts." (Jones also notes that Frend deliberately suppressed a 1885 paper he wrote advocating injecting of cocaine.)

"In tracing ... the genesis of Freud's original discoveries, we may therefore legitimately consider that the greatest of them---namely, the universality of the Oedipus complex---was potentially facilitated by his own unusual family constellation, the spur it gave to his curiosity, and the opportunity it afforded of a complete repression."

"When he got hold of a simple but significant fact he would feel, and know, that it was an example of something general and universal, and the idea of collecting statistics on the matter was quite alien to him. It is one of the things for which other, more humdrum, workers have reproached him, but nevertheless that is the way the mind of a genius works.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Steven H Propp TOP 100 REVIEWER on August 18, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Alfred Ernest Jones (1879-1958) was a Welsh psychoanalyst, and close associate of Sigmund Freud. While this account was written by a committed Freudian (and one who actively worked to exclude Jung from Frued), it is nevertheless filled with insights and details that are essential to a knowledge of Freud. Jones includes in detail (throughout all three volumes) Freud's life and works, of course, but the real value of Jones' book is the detail of the record given, and Jones' own insightful comments.

For example, "Freud took elaborate measures to secure his privacy, especially concerning his early life. On two occasions he completely destroyed all his correspondence, notes, diaries, and manuscripts." (Jones also notes that Frend deliberately suppressed a 1885 paper he wrote advocating injecting of cocaine.)

"In tracing ... the genesis of Freud's original discoveries, we may therefore legitimately consider that the greatest of them---namely, the universality of the Oedipus complex---was potentially facilitated by his own unusual family constellation, the spur it gave to his curiosity, and the opportunity it afforded of a complete repression."

"When he got hold of a simple but significant fact he would feel, and know, that it was an example of something general and universal, and the idea of collecting statistics on the matter was quite alien to him. It is one of the things for which other, more humdrum, workers have reproached him, but nevertheless that is the way the mind of a genius works.
Read more ›
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jorge F. Maldonado Serrano on September 2, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The most complete study of Freud's Work and life. That explains why still today almost 50 years after it appeared, it is still a cited work.
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By reading man on September 22, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Freud's map of the unconscious has become obsolete. Anyone who accepts it needs to consult with an informed neurologist.

What's permanent and lasting in Freud is his vision of man as confined within a reality he never made that requires courage and stamina to endure. Freud once said that life was mostly suffering, but the small amount of pleasure and happiness that could be achieved made it worthwhile.

Ernest Jones three volume biography is much too long, but fortunately we have this excellent abridgement by Lionel Trilling and Steven Marcus. Though I've never read Jones, I think the editors have done justice to him, have in fact made his book a more lasting contribution, rather as Low did with Gibbon. (Trevor-Roper, for example, may have read Gibbon whole many times, but for non-historians Low's abridgement provides a solid meal, rather than a surfeit of delicacies.)

Freud's day as an influence of literary criticism is done--and for that matter so is literary criticism thanks to absurd "literary theory"--but if you want to understand why he meant so much to critics of the 1930s-40s-50s (especially Trilling) this is the book to read.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I ordered this book after reading a library copy. It was so good, I just wanted to have it among my shelves. Detailed psychological bio of Freud, written by a former follower of his. Jones writes with sympathy, yet is clear about Freud's foibles and weaknesses.
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