Life on the Tenure Track and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $21.00
  • Save: $3.06 (15%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Minor wear to the cover and edges. There are no internal or external markings.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Life on the Tenure Track: Lessons from the First Year Paperback – April 6, 2005


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.94
$8.00 $0.01


Frequently Bought Together

Life on the Tenure Track: Lessons from the First Year + What the Best College Teachers Do
Price for both: $34.87

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (April 6, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 080188103X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801881039
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #193,859 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

A beautifully written book, part memoir, part meditation, part user's manual—all the parts held together by the personality and reflections of the author who is by turns exuberant, anxious, triumphant, rueful, and always immensely appealing. Anyone who has ever taught will find waiting on the pages of this book the shock, and pleasure, of recognition.

(Stanley Fish, University of Illinois at Chicago)

With humor and pathos, Jim Lang tells a powerful story of his first year as a college teacher, offering a wealth of insights that will help graduate students and new faculty—and maybe even not-so-new faculty—learn to survive and flourish as good teachers. I came away with a renewed appreciation of the very real challenges and opportunities we face as educators.

(Ken Bain, author of What the Best College Teachers Do)

Jim Lang's account of the ups and downs of his first year of college teaching make me wish I had taken notes during my own first contact with the other side of the desk. That year was longer ago than I care to mention, but I found it suddenly before me with a vividness that I can only attribute to Lang's evocative writing.

(Dennis Baron, University of Illinois)

May become the 'bible' for graduate students and new faculty. Lang's descriptions and analysis sparkle with warmth, humor, goodwill, and honesty. I found myself rooting for him, and viewed him as a mentor, turning the page looking for his very thoughtful advice. I would enthusiastically recommend this book to graduate students, adjunct professors, tenure-track and tenured faculty, and administrators.

(Lynn Sacco, University of Tennessee)

Jim Lang is a great guide whose warm, honest, funny, and poignant book will give advice and comfort to all panicked souls standing in front of a class for the first time, or wondering whether to speak at department meetings with senior professors who seem to know everything.

(Emily Toth, Ms. Mentor from the Chronicle of Higher Education)

Lang is a wonderfully engaging writer... he's obviously deeply committed to the craft of teaching and the craft of writing.

(Dr. Erica Dreifus Adjunct Advocate)

Faculty at all levels will recognize their own experiences somewhere in this short, perceptive, and ultimately entertaining account of academic life.

(Rebecca Manley Academic Matters)

Lang demonstrates that there are many largely universal survival struggles and self-doubts which are shared in common by most of us embarking on a new career in the academy.

(Alan E. Bayer Journal of Higher Education)

Offers a lively report on how it looks and feels to shoot the academic rapids today.

(Mary Taylor Huber Change)

I would not be surprised if [ Life on the Tenure Track] became one of the texts distributed by teaching and learning centers to new assistant professors at orientation workshops. It would serve them well.

(Patricia Donahue College English)

An interesting and accessible narrative.

(Mark Hulsether Teaching Theology and Religion)

About the Author

James M. Lang is an assistant professor at Assumption College.


More About the Author

I am a writer, teacher, and lecturer, mostly on the subject of higher education in the United States. Currently I am an Associate Professor of English and Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence at Assumption College. I write a monthly column on teaching and learning for The Chronicle of Higher Education, and occasional freelance pieces in other publications. I live in Worcester, MA, with my spouse (also a teacher) and our five children. They keep us pretty busy. You can keep up to date with current writing at my blog at http://www.jamesmlang.com, or via Twitter at @LangOnCourse.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Sarah Schwartz on February 1, 2007
Format: Paperback
I appreciated the very human story, but as someone just starting out on this path, I found it discouraging that the moral of the story seems to be "don't even try to get research done during the term" rather than "try and work with what you have".

From Lang's description, it sounds like he has all the qualities of "slow starters" illustrated in Robert Boice's book _Advice for New Faculty Members: Nihil Nimus_: he is impatient, overly ambitious in his goals, under-estimates how much time things take, will not work unless he has large blocks of time, allows other things to cut into his research time, and does not try to improve his work habits in realistic ways by taking advantage of the time that he does have. The one time he takes out a project, he tries to tackle it all at once, becomes discouraged by its immensity, and then puts it away. I kept cheering for him to discover better work habits, but he never did.

I did like his lessons about teaching and adapting to one's course, and found it refreshing to hear an honest discussion of the dynamics of departmental politics, and reassuring to hear how he felt initial hesitation to ask for advice, but always got good advice when he asked.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Janice Lastella on August 9, 2005
Format: Paperback
I always thought the life of a college professor was one of quiet repose, but I was wrong! Author James Lang takes the reader inside his chosen profession and reveals the stress, challenge and gratification involved. He details his experience in forging new relationships with colleagues and students alike, and relates his commitment to maintaining his own teaching style--which, I think, is quite innovative. This book is a must for anyone choosing this line of work. --Jan Lastella
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By The Professor, Ann Marian on March 18, 2008
Format: Paperback
The author provides warm, reflective, from-the-frontlines commentary on being an English professor at a small college who is also a Catholic, a father, a person with chronic health problems, and an unambitious researcher. If not many of those identifiers apply to you, don't bother with this book; it is written from a highly personalized perspective. For more widely applicable help, I recommend Robert Boice's Advice for New Faculty Members or Emily Toth's Ms. Mentor's Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia.

instead.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Frogreads on September 21, 2005
Format: Paperback
In a sea of academic self-help and personal essays, James Lang's account of his first tenure-track experience is -- thankfully -- more of a token from a companion than a mentor. It rings true to life as a college professor, quirks and foibles included, and humanely regarded.

If anything else, his personable ethos makes for an comforting time with a friend, which is to be appreciated.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Martin Hughes on May 28, 2005
Format: Paperback
I've never reviewed a book on Amazon before, but I really want to recommend this one. If you're headed toward the tenure track, or are even thinking about it, you should read this book. It's served as a nice counterpoint to all the advice books I've been reading lately. While those other books have been really helpful to me, this one's helpful in a different way--it shows rather than tells. It also helps remind me that things don't always come off well, despite our best intentions, and it's all too easy to ignore/forget good advice under pressure. Academic life is not all that it's cracked up to be, it can be a real grind, but it's still got plenty to recommend it, and Lang's painfully honest account reminds me to count my blessings. A bad academic job is better than many good non-academic ones. I'm recommending "Life on the Tenure Track" to my fellow grad students, and also to undergrads who have romantic aspirations for the professoriate.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?