Life in the Wrong Lane and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $13.95
  • Save: $1.39 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Life in the Wrong Lane has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Life in the Wrong Lane Paperback – August 18, 2009


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.56
$6.50 $2.08


Frequently Bought Together

Life in the Wrong Lane + Where'd You Go, Bernadette: A Novel
Price for both: $26.05

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: iUniverse (August 18, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1440152764
  • ISBN-13: 978-1440152764
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,821,413 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Greg Dobbs worked at ABC News for 23 years, first as a producer, then for most of his career as a correspondent, including ten years overseas. He covered major domestic and foreign stories including the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the first Gulf War, the revolution and then the occupation of the US embassy in Iran, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, the Solidarity movement and martial law in Poland, the civil war in and the ejection of the PLO from Beirut, the Iran-Iraq war, and the civil war and deaths of IRA hunger-strikers in Northern Ireland.

Dobbs won two national Emmy Awards in the process, the first for "Best Spot News Coverage on a Network" for coverage of a terrible earthquake in Italy in 1980, the other for "Best Network Documentary" in 1989 for a documentary on the environmental poisoning of America. He also received the "Distinguished Service Award" from the Society of Professional Journalists.

When ABC asked him in 1992 to move from his home in Colorado's Rocky Mountains to New York City, it took him approximately one nanosecond to say no. That led to a second career as a radio talk show host, a newspaper opinion columnist, and the television moderator of an Emmy Award winning discussion program on Rocky Mountain PBS.

In 2003, Dobbs returned to the road as a correspondent for the all high-definition television network HDNet. It put him back on airplanes, reporting documentaries for the program World Report from around the country and around the world. He has produced and reported segments for World Report about Agent Orange in Vietnam, terrorism in Lebanon, politics in Russia, the post-Apartheid era in South Africa, wealth in Dubai, autocracy in Venezuela, assisted suicide in Switzerland, free trade coffee in Nicaragua, dirty water in Indonesia, post-war recovery in Liberia, cocaine in Bolivia, assisted suicide in Switzerland, and PTSD in the U.S. military, among many others. He has also reported extensively from Israel and the Palestinian territories.

In total, Dobbs has reported from 49 states and more than 80 countries.
He also is the author of two books: Life in the Wrong Lane, about all the wacky things a journalist has to do just to get to the point of reporting a story, and a university-level textbook on writing for broadcasting that is called Better Broadcast Writing, Better Broadcast News.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 11 customer reviews
I enjoyed Greg's book immensivly.
Amazon Customer
Crisp, clear, conversational writing brings his real-life adventures to life.
F. Shook
Here he relaxes and has come up with a book that is a fast, funny read.
Bruce Hall

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Brent Green on September 11, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For many years I have had the privilege of watching parts of this book unfold as Greg Dobbs dispatched his personal reports of worldwide travels to family and friends, sharing remarkable stories behind the stories he was covering. Some of these reports were written close to the bone as Greg returned from distant locations, often exhausted, with details and back-story vivid in his mind. As I read his harrowing chronicles of a reporter covering Hurricane Katrina, cocaine trafficking in Columbia and bewildering third-world inconveniences of Russia today, I realized how little I understood about the enormous responsibilities and challenges of a heretofore romantic and mysterious profession known as "foreign correspondent."

These are stories of a special breed of men and women who lunge into the middle of major news unfolding, often risking personal security and safety in their quest for truthful witness and reporting of major events shaping our lives. These are stories of fortitude, daring, irony, inconvenience, risk, exhilaration and unlimited curiosity. These are stories that provide surprising and entertaining insights into the operations and demands of modern news media, a true and unvarnished presentation of how "freedom of the press" finds contemporary realization with instantaneous, satellite- and internet-delivered, 24/7/365 electronic news coverage.

This finely written book not only presents the craft of a seasoned writer and journalist, making it an inspiring and fun-to-read page-turner, it also provides an insider's glimpse into what it really takes to be a world-class journalist -- the personal qualities that go beyond mere skill at gathering information, interviewing, assembling, editing and delivering the news before a camera. Greg Dobbs' accounts demonstrate raw ingredients of success, not only in journalism, but in all professional endeavors, qualities such as tenacity, risk-taking and finely honed competitive instincts.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By F. Shook on September 7, 2009
Format: Paperback
As I read Greg's book, I could almost hear him sitting in the same room, telling me his stories. Crisp, clear, conversational writing brings his real-life adventures to life. His writing makes history interesting, makes it feel spontaneous, and infuses it with humanity. I love his sideway glances at journalism as a profession as he hurries toward the next story. Along the way he validates the vocation's worth and underscores why journalists of his stature are among a society's most important eyes and ears.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bruce Hall on November 9, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I should begin my letting you know that Greg Dobbs is a friend of mine. We got acquainted working together during the twenty years I was a videotape editor at ABC News. I am not writing this just to plug a friendl's work, however (I have other friends who have written books, but have never reviewed them). It just occurred to me that since I know the world Greg is writing about, my comments might in fact be helpful. This is, quite simply, the best book I have read as far as giving a feeling for what is is like to work in network news. It is not, as Greg admits, a book of historical insights into great events. It is a personal account of his adventures, a collection of the kind of stories we tell each other over drinks at the end of the day. He conveys the excitement of a job in which you don't know, when you wake up, where you will be at the end of the day, a job in which everywhere you go there is at least the possibility that something of national interest is going on. He conveys the wackiness that often results from these assignments, and the frustration when you knock yourself out to get a story, only to have it bumped from the show from lack of time. Greg is a very funny guy who usually keeps his sense of humor out of his work. Here he relaxes and has come up with a book that is a fast, funny read. If you are interested in what it is like to be a foreign correspondent or work for network news, this book captures the flavor of that experience better than any other book I know.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By David Henderson on August 26, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Greg Dobbs has been a highly respected television network correspondent - first with ABC News and now with HDNet's World Report - for nearly three decades. From royal weddings and shuttle launches to wars, epidemics and elections, he has covered nearly every major world story in recent history. His new book, "Life in the Wrong Lane," delivers a rare, unvarnished, poignant and often humorous inside look at the life of a TV journalist. He takes us there to explain what it is like to cover and report the news, often under challenging and emotional circumstances. A natural storyteller, Dobbs has been writing about the behind-the-scenes and very human perspective of reporting news from far-flung locations for years and sharing some with his wide universe of family and friends via e-mail. "Life in the Wrong Lane" is a compelling and honest journal by a man who has dedicated his life to the highest standards of journalism.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By C. H. Sampson on September 7, 2009
Format: Paperback
I just finished Greg's book this morning. He left me wanting more...I'm sure that's what He wanted!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
Book review by Jack L. Kennedy from joplinindependent.com

The term "foreign correspondent" for many conjures up the image of someone buckling their swash and charging bravely into battle to prove that the pen is mightier than the sword.

Or think of Harrison Ford in the many Indiana Jones movies. He looked cool, always said and did the right thing eventually, and wiggled out of impossible situations. And he wore a pith helmet well.

Greg Dobbs is not that sort of a guy, but he is a risk-taker who has been in strange places at the wrong time, from Wounded Knee, South Dakota to Yemen. His book title refers to his career as Life in the Wrong Lane: Why Journalists Go In When Everyone Else Wants Out (Rising Star/iUniverse Inc.). If you think media folks take no risks, get paid way too much at the network big market levels, and are surrounded by glamor, not work, then this little volume may change a few notions of what it is like to be the hand overseas. During Dobbs' time before the advent of extensive Internet communication, Dobbs could finagle getting the news in unfriendly countries but he had much difficulty and added risk getting the news out.

Dobbs worked at ABC News for 23 years when much of that time it was a poor cousin to to the other networks. His travels as correspondent or producer have taken him to a variety of spots overseas for almost half his career.

His approach to the book's table of contents is an early clue to the literate and revealing yet often unconventional way in which he approaches an adventurer's tale. Chapters are titled: "The Night I Surrendered to a Cow" in Wounded Knee, "Excuse Me, Do You Speak English?" and "How Would I Like To Do What?"--plus other tantalizing entries.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again