Customer Reviews


54 Reviews
5 star:
 (39)
4 star:
 (8)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


44 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hacking Your Way To Productive
I will admit to being a sucker for books like this. I love books that offer ways to improve your time management, limit interruptions, and streamline your life. Lifehacker helps you do all that and more. It is the most practical book I have read on this subject, and I promise that it will improve the way you work.

There are a ton of "theory" books out there...
Published on June 30, 2011 by Bradley Bevers

versus
29 of 39 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars My head just exploded
My impression was that this book was intended to help you to be more efficient in your day-to-day activities. In the preface the author says it's a smorgasbord and that the reader should select the things they like. Unfortunately, the author and I don't see things the same way. I read this book cover-to-cover and the only thing I used was the Zendesk Wall for ambient...
Published on October 15, 2012 by Michael G. Lustig


‹ Previous | 1 26 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

44 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hacking Your Way To Productive, June 30, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Lifehacker: The Guide to Working Smarter, Faster, and Better (Paperback)
I will admit to being a sucker for books like this. I love books that offer ways to improve your time management, limit interruptions, and streamline your life. Lifehacker helps you do all that and more. It is the most practical book I have read on this subject, and I promise that it will improve the way you work.

There are a ton of "theory" books out there. Books that will tell you to spend your time more productively, not visit certain site, and get rid of all the extra emails. All great advice, but it can be hard for you to put into place without the right tools. Adam Pash and Gina Trapani give you those tools in Lifehacker. From email reduction to time-wasters to creating doable to-do lists, this is the best resource to turn to.

The book is structured in an easy to read way. At the beginning of each hack, the authors tell you the three most important pieces of information right up front:

Level: How easy is this going to be?

Platform: Where do I use this? Web, Windows, Mac, All?

Cost: How much does it cost?

This is a great way to evaluate the hacks that you will need quickly and will help you to find the information that will benefit you most. Fortunately, most of the hacks offered in this book are both easy and free.

Some of my favorite hacks in the book include:

Hack 1: Empty Your Inbox (and Keep It Empty)

Hack 9: Script and Automate Repetitive Replies

Hack 14: Instantly Recall Any Number of Different Passwords

Hack 24: Design Your Own Planner

Hack 25: Make Your To-Do List Doable

Hack 29: Dash Through Tasks With a Timer

Hack 39: Limit Visits to Time-Wasting Websites

Hack 53: Reduce Repetitive Typing

Hack 59: Become A Scheduling Black-Belt with Google Calendar

Hack 82: Augment Reality With Your Phone

Bottom Line: There is a ton of great information contained in this huge 476 page book. You probably won't use every hack and you probably already follow some of the author's advice, but you will (at least you should) use most of the hacks in this book. Highly Recommended.

BONUS: Lifehacker also has a companion website that has updates, additional information, and more tips and tricks.

BONUS #2: For the best theory book on why you should implement these time-saving tools, read The 4-Hour Workweek, Expanded and Updated: Expanded and Updated, With Over 100 New Pages of Cutting-Edge Content. They complement each other very well.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Changed the way I work in one weekend!, June 27, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Lifehacker: The Guide to Working Smarter, Faster, and Better (Paperback)
I bought this book as a birthday present to myself. Lucky me!

Adam Pash and Gina Trapani have distilled the very best tools from the Lifehacker blog to help you streamline your workflow, focus your attention and work on the stuff that matters. I read it straight through in a weekend and now I am going back through, and following their clear, detailed instructions to implement very meaningful changes to the way I work. They have included hacks for everyone - newbies to geeks.

This is an outstanding example of book written to take full advantage of the digital format. They have included many links, allowing readers to go deeper into the content if they want. The table of contents is like a toolbox filled with gems. After reading it on my ipad, I downloaded it to my desktop and I am working from there to upgrade my digital life.

Lifehacker continues to be a Lifechanger!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great collection of tips to make you a power user, September 11, 2011
By 
Lost My Mind (California, United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Lifehacker: The Guide to Working Smarter, Faster, and Better (Paperback)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I've read the occasional article from Lifehacker blog and often found them to be hit-or-miss. However, the Lifehacker guide is a great collection of the best-of-the-best tips and tricks for making you more effective and efficient. Most of the tips are completely free and many of them don't even require a third-party application (such as using your smart phone, Outlook, or Mail client more effectively).

The authors also make an effort to provide instructions/tips for Mac/Windows/iPhone/Android/etc. They also provide step-by-step instructions and links to software to minimize confusion or hassle.

The three caveats about this book are:
1. The book appears written for a computer novice, but many of the tips require you to be fairly proficient with computers and "tinkering" with applications. While the step-by-step instructions make it fairly easy to follow, the troubleshooting instructions often leave something to desire (especially if mess up a step). However, there are ample warnings when you can irreparably mess up your computer.

2. The tips have a relatively short lifespan--that is, within a year or two, many of the tips will be outdated or the instructions will be incorrect. There's a website to get updated instructions for the tips, but it's not clear how long the website will actually be maintained. A proficient computer user will still be able to understand and apply the tips provided even if the written material goes out of date.

3. The sections on social engineering are not nearly as useful as the ones on tech tips. Unless you are a person who gets a lot out of self-help books, those sections won't add much value. They will sometimes throw in ideas on how to 'remind' yourself to be more efficient, but your mileage may vary.

Overall, a pretty good book. Worth the read as most people will get at least a few, really useful tips. Heck, anyone who uses Outlook and hasn't "mastered" inbox rules will find the book worth reading.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Organize your life (or at least your email), October 5, 2011
By 
Timothy Walker (Orlando, Florida USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Lifehacker: The Guide to Working Smarter, Faster, and Better (Paperback)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
If you've ever visited Lifehacker.com and thought, "I wish this was a book", then consider this a prayer answered. Even if you've never heard of the site, if you are looking for a highly accessible, user-friendly guide to making better use of the technology that you likely use on a daily basis - a PC or Mac, a smartphone, and Google - then this book (and its parent site) are well worth your time and attention.

Four stars for those of us who already use keyboard shortcuts and know what macros are. Novices should give it one more star... or be given this guide for the holidays.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


29 of 39 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars My head just exploded, October 15, 2012
This review is from: Lifehacker: The Guide to Working Smarter, Faster, and Better (Paperback)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
My impression was that this book was intended to help you to be more efficient in your day-to-day activities. In the preface the author says it's a smorgasbord and that the reader should select the things they like. Unfortunately, the author and I don't see things the same way. I read this book cover-to-cover and the only thing I used was the Zendesk Wall for ambient sound.
Let me start by saying that I am a computer programmer so installing and using software is a daily activity for me. There are a few non-computer related tips that some people might benefit from like making a to-do list but the majority of the book is about computers and software.

All of the software the author introduces requires you to learn how to use a new product. Since most of the software is written by different companies, there is no consistency across products. That means that you would theoretically need to learn to use a lot of new programs. Personally, that sounds like additional work rather than a way to be more efficient. If you were to install all of the program the author introduces, you would have dozens of new products running on your computer resulting in a degradation of performance.

The author also makes statements like your email inbox should be emptied every day. That statement alone makes me cringe. He then goes on to say that in a business environment you should not respond to emails quickly because it sets unrealistic expectations. In fact, he said you should respond to business emails in 4-6 hours and up to 48 hours later. If I did that, I wouldn't have a job.

There were some browser tricks I didn't know about but these were covered too quickly to be of any value. The same applies to many of the email tips.
And for the record searching for "Tax*.*" does not return files with "Tax" anywhere in the name; rather, it returns files that begin with "Tax". The correct search is "*tax*.*".
I appreciate the amount of work that went into this book but found little that I would actually use. Granted, I'm not your average computer user but a lot of this book relies on you to do the work. That's kind of the opposite of what I expected.

Personally, I would have benefited more if the book focused on key areas like using the web browser's search features and configuring rules to automate email delivery and sorting in Outlook. The problem is that the author not only discussed numerous Windows products but also tried to cover Mac-OS too.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lifehacker, organized and simplified, August 5, 2011
This review is from: Lifehacker: The Guide to Working Smarter, Faster, and Better (Paperback)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
While I wouldn't quite call this a life-hacking book - it's almost all hacks involving your digital life - this is a fantastic tool for anyone who spends a lot of time with their computer, email, smartphone, etc and wants to streamline their processes. It's very heavily inspired by the David Allan and Tim Ferriss brand of efficiency, which I love, so the book is almost entirely composed of little tweaks you can make in your life to save you time on repetitive and stupid tasks.

However, they also have a surprisingly insightful section on how to trick yourself into getting things done, and include a lot of mental hacks and processes that actually work in making your workday more productive and streamlined.

While the average computer user (think: your mom) won't understand a word of how to install the browser plugins or create email filters, anyone who is reasonably proficient with their computer should be able to follow the simple instructions for the tweaks in the book. I found a few small projects that seemed beyond me, but honestly, I do believe that if I read the instructions really well and did a bit of googling for help, I'd be able to make it happen.

So, if you're somewhat tech-savvy (but not so tech-savvy that you've already read this stuff on Lifehacker's site and Four-Hour-Workweek-ed your life years ago), you'll really enjoy this book, and it will definitely change how you operate. The advantage to reading it in the book and not all over their website is that you have it organized in a very clean way to where it's easy to see how their mental and digital hacks fit together into a cohesive way of managing your digital self. Plus, the table of contents and the index are awesome.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Even if you just take away a few hacks, it's worth it, October 7, 2011
By 
This review is from: Lifehacker: The Guide to Working Smarter, Faster, and Better (Paperback)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Here's what I like -

~ All hacks have a clear descriptive title so you can skip over things you don't want.

~ All hacks are graded by skill level as - Easy, Medium, or Advanced.

~ The potential problems from implementing a hack are clearly identified - usually these are security issues. If you don't understand these or don't want to manage the risk, then you can easily avoid that type of hack.

~ A lot of the hacks reinforce or support GTD (Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity) which is a protocol I like and sometimes struggle with - so anything that automates GTD is a boon to me.

~ I immediately found several useful hacks at the easy level which I already knew about but this book pushed me over the edge into actually using them. The first one was installing the adblock plus extension to Chrome. Also, I knew about some but not all the ways to "Google like a Pro" and I have found these very useful (Hack 90).

~ There's lots of hacks here that I might find somewhat useful. I'm not implementing them now but I'm glad to know they exist and something about them so that if my work changes so that these would become more useful, then I can easily find and implement them.

Here's what I don't like

- Hey, enough about my computer, tell me how to fix my life! Just kidding - they define a lifehacker as someone who uses clever tech tricks to get work done. And they meet that goal.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very nice but not anymore up-to-date, June 4, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Very nice book but old, they should do a revised and updated version. For example, the book suggests Truecrypt as the best encryption software, but the Truecrypt project is now officially abandoned and users are suggested to migrate to other more reliable software.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Book with Real Life Productivity Ideas, July 29, 2011
This review is from: Lifehacker: The Guide to Working Smarter, Faster, and Better (Paperback)
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Lifehacker is a a fabulous resource for making your life more productive. I haven't read the entire thing from front to back because, like any other resource, you only read the subjects that apply to your particular situation. I do a lot of research on the web so when I opened the book I immediately went to HACK 49: Search the Web in Three Keystrokes. It gave me some ideas on how to make quicker searches (which I already knew, but still, others might not). Each Hack is formatted in this manner:

Hack #: Title of Hack
Level....beginner, easy, medium, advanced
Platform....all, windows, linux, mac and a few others
Cost...free (there may be a few with costs associated, but I haven't seen any)

There is a plethora of information and most if it is really handy. For instance HACK 14: Instantly Recall Any Number of Different Passwords. In this hack they suggest using a base password and changing prefixes and suffixes according to the site. For example if your password is asdf and you want to log into ebay it would turn into asdfeba or ebaasdf. You're just adding the first three letters of the site to the beginning or the end of the password. To make it even more secure you can add two numbers that you typically use. This is far better than using the same password for everything.

If you're not familiar with lifehacker.com, then you're missing out. Every week there is a list of the most popular articles. They cover such things as "How I Cut My Utility Bill by a Third with Common Sense Tech" to "How to Duel Boot Multiple ROMs on Your Android". There was even one on a portable shower that involved water, soap gel and plastic dish. It was actually pretty clever, even though I doubt I would use this particular hack.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Even if you implement only one hack, it's worth it, February 18, 2013
This review is from: Lifehacker: The Guide to Working Smarter, Faster, and Better (Paperback)
I'm following Lifehacker on the web for some years now, also often listen to their video podcast. I first bought the previous edition (Upgrade Your Life: The Lifehacker Guide to Working Smarter, Faster, Better), and implemented many of the ideas in it. My favorite was to revamp my e-mail reading process from folder based to the "trusted trio" folders, and archive+search method. It took me about a month to convert, but since then my e-mail clutter is gone. I could tell the same for many-many tips, like use Simplenote and Evernote for note taking, "Map my time", or using a timer to complete tasks. Of course, there are other tips that I tried, spent the time and energy to do them, but they didn't work.

I liked:
+ High quality, real-life proven tips
+ Best hacks of the website in one place
+ Format, ratings of difficulty/money/platform
+ Although technology develops very fast, 90% of hacks is still up-to-date
+ Explanations have the right amount of information (not missing info, and not too detailed either)
+ I always find something "new" in this book!
+ Good balance of IT/workflow/paper based/time management hacks

I didn't like:
- Large amount of tips need good IT literacy
- Difficult to "migrate" from previous edition, I don't know what's new
- I missed some help from the authors to help track what I implemented or not
- I missed some easy prioritization (essential, good ROI, just for fun)

If you had the previous version: you find some updates and new hacks, but take effort to see what's new.
If this is your first Lifehacker book: 100% recommended - dive in, implement, and enjoy the results!

Update 2014-09-22:
Some of the tips became part of everyday life since this edition was published, like Dropbox/OneDrive/Google Drive are mainstream, and Evernote is becoming a default app on smartphones. Still, I love this book, and go back to fine-tune or experiment with a new tip. I also recommend it to "Gadget lover" clients, and bought many copies for friends. The time the book saved me over the years is simply invaluable!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 26 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Lifehacker: The Guide to Working Smarter, Faster, and Better
Lifehacker: The Guide to Working Smarter, Faster, and Better by Gina Trapani (Paperback - June 28, 2011)
$29.99 $20.60
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.