Life's Ultimate Questions: An Introduction to Philosophy and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $2.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Life's Ultimate Questions Hardcover – July 27, 1999


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$19.47 $4.77
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Zondervan (July 27, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0310223644
  • ISBN-13: 978-0310223641
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 1.2 x 9.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #344,328 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Life’s Ultimate Questions is unique among introductory philosophy textbooks. By synthesizing three distinct approaches—topical, historical, and worldview/conceptual systems—it affords students a breadth and depth of perspective previously unavailable in standard introductory texts. Part One, Six Conceptual Systems, explores the philosophies of: Naturalism Plato Aristotle Plotinus Augustine Aquinas Part Two, Important Problems in Philosophy, sheds light on: The Law of Noncontradiction Possible Worlds Epistemology I: Whatever Happened to

Truth? Epistemology II: A Tale of Two Systems Epistemology III: Reformed

Epistemology God I: The Existence of God God II: The Nature of God Metaphysics: Some Questions About

Indeterminism Ethics I: The Downward Path Ethics II: The Upward Path Human Nature: The Mind-Body Problem

and Survival After Death Life’s Ultimate Questions is unique among introductory philosophy textbooks. By synthesizing three distinct approaches—topical, historical, and worldview/conceptual systems—it affords students a breadth and depth of perspective previously unavailable in standard introductory texts. Part One, Six Conceptual Systems, explores the philosophies of: Naturalism Plato Aristotle Plotinus Augustine Aquinas Part Two, Important Problems in Philosophy, sheds light on: The Law of Noncontradiction Possible Worlds Epistemology I: Whatever Happened to

Truth? Epistemology II: A Tale of Two Systems Epistemology III: Reformed

Epistemology God I: The Existence of God God II: The Nature of God Metaphysics: Some Questions About

Indeterminism Ethics I: The Downward Path Ethics II: The Upward Path Human Nature: The Mind-Body Problem

and Survival After Death Life’s Ultimate Questions is unique among introductory philosophy textbooks. By synthesizing three distinct approaches—topical, historical, and worldview/conceptual systems—it affords students a breadth and depth of perspective previously unavailable in standard introductory texts. Part One, Six Conceptual Systems, explores the philosophies of: Naturalism Plato Aristotle Plotinus Augustine Aquinas Part Two, Important Problems in Philosophy, sheds light on: The Law of Noncontradiction Possible Worlds Epistemology I: Whatever Happened to

Truth? Epistemology II: A Tale of Two Systems Epistemology III: Reformed

Epistemology God I: The Existence of God God II: The Nature of God Metaphysics: Some Questions About

Indeterminism Ethics I: The Downward Path Ethics II: The Upward Path Human Nature: The Mind-Body Problem

and Survival After Deat -- Publisher

From the Publisher

Life's Ultimate Questions is a basic textbook on introduction to philosophy that helps the reader understand the notion of a worldview and the role that worldviews play for everyone. It also helps readers achieve self-understanding about their own worldview. The book focuses on six specific views: naturalism, and the views of Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, Augustine, and Aquinas. Life's Ultimate Questions also deals with such topics as ethics, metaphysics, and possible worlds.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Ronald Nash has completed a great introductory book on thE subject of philosophy.
K.H.
Written from a Christian perspective, Nash draws out in helpful detail the issues and problems facing various forms of philosophy and the questions they raise.
JG0107
I really hope this book gives him the push to finish the rest of his classes--some of the other classes he took were very difficult.
BlueWaterDreams

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By J. S. Bader on December 30, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book is what got me interested in philosophy. Having been required to read various theological books when I was a kid I hadn't really understood them to the fullest extent and had little interest to know much more about them or what the works said. However, this work helped shape my thinking and developed my interest in philosophy. The book is a textbook and reads like a textbook, so it doesn't have a tone that would get one excited. Yet, the formation of the book is very good.

Some intro to philosophy books have a name dropper style i.e. going through a very brief history of philosophy by describing the philosopher with a feather light touch on their philosophy (similar to the book Looking At Philosophy: The Unbearable Heaviness of Philosophy Made Lighter). Or give an intro to a certain concept without really going into how others have done it in the past (like ]]Being Good: A Short Introduction to Ethics). However, this starts off with a history of ancient philosophy with an acceptable amount of information of several ancient philosophers. He then moves on to some problems of philosophy like relativism and deconstructionism.

Rather than just giving you some general information about philosophy, Nash's goal seems to get you to think like a philosopher. He has in mind to train you analytic skills and be prepared to face some of the proponents of the worldviews that Nash considers (and any Christian should consider) problems of philosophy.

Unlike many philosophy text books, Nash does not separate his worldview from philosophy.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By K.H. on November 11, 2000
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Ronald Nash has completed a great introductory book on thE subject of philosophy. He begins by discussing world views and then writes about the six conceptual systems: Naturalism, Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus,Augustine, ansd Aquinas. He writes about the Law of Non-contradiction and epistemology. The strength of the book are the chapters on God's existence and nature.
The book is very much highly prone to Christian Theism. However, he writes truthfully about the theories and peoples involoved throughout philosophy. Since he is writing a text book, you will not find any overt evangelism taking place here, which is a good thing, since this book is actually menat as a primer for college students.
The book is easy to read and Nash's strength is his ability to make complicated subjects easy to understand.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 20, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Lots of people are frightened of textbooks; too difficult to understand, they think. Too dry, others suppose. "Life's Ultimate Questions" can help even the most general reader get a handle on the most important philosophers in history. The book can provide a foundation that can help even a beginner move on to dozens of important topics such as do humans have a soul? Is there life after death? How can we know if God exists? What are the most important options in ethics? How can we know that something is the case? This book is a solid and helpful piece of work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 17, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Ron Nash is first and foremost a Christian philosopher, and he approaches all subjects from that angle, even an introductory text such as Life's Ultimate Questions. This is all well and good, but it means that this text is really only appropriate for use in Christian colleges and seminaries, which is obviously what Nash has in mind.

With that out of the way, I have to give Nash a lot of praise for his work here. Decades of teaching philosophy have honed his writing and communication skills to a degree where he can make complex concepts sound simple. The structure of the book is interesting as well. In the first half, Nash defines and critiques the conceptual systems of six major philosophers: Democritus (naturalism), Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus (Neoplatonism), Augustine, and Aquinas. The second half deals with specific philosophical topics and problems, and here Nash moves into recent philosophy with discussions of analytic philosophy, postmodernism, and the like. This structure is very effective, as it achieves more of a balance between the history of philosophy approach and the topical approach, while leaning more toward the topical when it comes to philosophical movements and questions that are representative of contemporary philosophers.

Nash sprinkles his discussion of these topics with criticisms from the standpoint of a Christian worldview. Again, this is fine, as all philosophers are working from a specific perspective, but a text that claims to be "An Introduction to Philosophy" probably ought to be a little less partisan. Consider something like Millard Erickson's Systematic Theology.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sharon A Powell on February 24, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you had to read the translated works of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle and others, it would take you months to interpret what you read. This book does it for you by systematically explaining their core ideas and breaks them down in understandable language. It further compares/contrasts the great philosophers so you can see how their ideas are alike or differ; how they expanded on the ideas of their predecessors and moved to their own thought on life's compelling questions.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?