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Lifetimes: The Beautiful Way to Explain Death to Children Paperback – October 1, 1983


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100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime


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Lifetimes: The Beautiful Way to Explain Death to Children + The Invisible String + I Miss You: A First Look at Death (First Look at Books)
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 and up
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten and up
  • Lexile Measure: 420L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam; 1 edition (October 1, 1983)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553344021
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553344028
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 8.2 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (94 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,834 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

The illustrations were beautiful.
Amazon Customer
This is a wonderful book that helps explain death and loss to young children.
Ms. Pattie
I read this to my 8 year old about once a month.
AvidReader

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

254 of 257 people found the following review helpful By M. Rosenthal on January 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
I have a fairly extensive collection of books about death and grieving for "my" children, which we have used for the loss of
family, friends and pets. But this is the only book I regularly give copies of to families. The "de-personalized" way it talks about death, the universality of its text combined with soft drawings and repetition are very soothing. This is NOT a book about emotions or stages of death. (If you are looking for one of those Everett Anderson's Goodbye is a positive place to start.)
This is a book about the rhythm of life and death for all creatures, for everything that is born. One of the best parts of the book is its emphasis on what a lifetime is, and how it is framed by birth and death, and that inbetween those "markers" is what is important. It explains that different creatures have different life spans, and that this aspect of nature is neither fair nor unfair. It simply is.
I do not restrict this book to times when a child is grieving,
I include it in our regular reading rotation, so that the children see death as a normal part of life experiences. Death is so emotionally charged, especially for the grown ups, that having a calm book is especially worthwhile. When a child is actually grieving balancing the more "intense" books with this soothing one, does wonders.
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141 of 143 people found the following review helpful By Jeff Haverlack on November 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
After losing my wife (33 years old) two years ago, this was one of the books that was recommended to me .... and I am glad I took the recommendation. This is a GREAT book for explaining the subject of lifetimes to children, especially in the 3-5 year old range.
What is great about this book and something I didn't realize at the time was that lifetimes didn't have to only related to death of people. EVERYTHING has a lifetime and it has helped my daughter in many ways. A couple months ago, when my daughter's balloon popped and she was very sad, she said "Dad, I guess my balloon's lifetime is over", and then she went to throw it away. She was sad but understood the concept that all things, living and unliving, have a lifetime. We still use the concepts today on a regular basis, and she still likes to read the book as well.
HIGHLY recommended, even for those children that haven't had to deal with true loss or death yet ... at least in my opinion.
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80 of 85 people found the following review helpful By Allison on July 19, 2004
Format: Paperback
I heard about this book and decided to take a look before I needed it. I know that eventually my child will start asking questions about death, and I'd like to know what resources are available. I was particularly drawn to this title because it can be tailored to a variety of religious belief systems. I disagree with a previous poster who stated that this book teaches that there is no afterlife. The way I read it, the book doesn't take a stand either way. Being "alive" on earth is not the same thing as "eternal life" in the religions I am familiar with. No religion I know of denies that earthly bodies are alive and then they die.
I like the fact that this book compares all types of organisms from plants to animals to people. The concept of a life span ties it all together. What is "in between" the beginning and ending of a life is living. I appreciate that this book emphasizes the in between, and therefore strikes a positive note.
I would caution against using this book as a regular picture book for toddlers and older preschoolers because it may actually introduce the idea of death before a child is able to comprehend the explanation. However, I think it's an excellent choice for a child who is asking about death or who has recently experienced the loss of a pet, friend, or relative.
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57 of 64 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 16, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is beautifully illustrated, and it explains the facts of life and death in a very direct and unsentimental way: all creatures have a lifetime, then they die. The book discusses the lifetimes of different living creatures, from insects who only live a few days, to large mammals who live many years. It describes people as living for "sixty or seventy years, sometimes even more." That is a little scary for a child whose grandparents are already way past those ages and still in great health. "Lifetimes" explains the concepts of lifespan and death, but does not offer comfort for those who fear death or are grieving. I recommend the book "Gentle Willow" for those who want a gentler, more comforting story, that is no less true to fact.
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 4, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book would be effective for grief therapy and for teaching about life cycles. It specifically answers the question: What is a lifetime?
My daughter, age 4, had a lot of questions about death. She was most especially interested in finding out when her "dying day" would be. This book seemed to help her understand that everyone's lifetime is special to them. I wanted her to understand that because someone else died it doesn't mean her death is imminent. A common fear among the young.
An exquisitely illustrated and plainly written book, it speaks clearly to the children about a complicated subject. I highly recommend it for all home and school libraries for ages three and up. It should be used as part of a comprehensive set of books on biological and familial concepts as it is not meant to answer all of a child's questions on life cycles, grief, death or dying.
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