Light Sleeper 1992 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(24) IMDb 6.7/10
Available in HD

John Letour (Dafoe) is a good man in a bad business, working for Ann (Sarandon) on the wrong side of the law, and he wants out. Will he get out before it's too late?

Starring:
Willem Dafoe, Susan Sarandon
Runtime:
1 hour 44 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Light Sleeper

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Light Sleeper

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Paul Schrader
Starring Willem Dafoe, Susan Sarandon
Supporting actors Dana Delany, David Clennon, Mary Beth Hurt, Victor Garber, Jane Adams, Paul Jabara, Robert Cicchini, Sam Rockwell, Rene Rivera, David Spade, Steven Posen, Ken Ladd, Brian Judge, Vince Cupone, Chris Northup, Paul Stocker, Bernadette Jurkowski, Tatiana von Furstenberg
Studio Lionsgate
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Customer Reviews

All the actors are doing great work as expected.
Diff D
This may sound very banal but Paul Schrader's take on this story-most of the action is at night-is nothing short of inspired.
Bete Noire
A bit slow in places, but it seems this movie was overlooked when it first came out.
Old Rick

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By carol irvin TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 20, 2001
Format: DVD
Writer-director Paul Schrader delivers his most satisfying film for me. He is even better known for his work when he solely screenwriters, such as for his unsurpassed "Taxi Driver," directed by his frequent collaborator, Marty Scorsese. For his own solo film though, this is my favorite. Schrader's film work is frequently compared to the late Robert Bresson's films. However, Bresson has always been a little too painterly for me. Schrader is painterly enough and to make it any more so evokes that dreaded word in film: slow. I frankly prefer this film to the Bresson films I've seen, which makes me a film heretic I realize. Urban alienation is at the core of this film, which is true of all Schrader's work, and Willem Dafoe plays a nocturnal drug dealer who doesn't get much sleep (hence the title), probably because his dreams remain so elusive from his grasp, as a metaphor for the overall film. Two women present the immediate conflict in the film. Susan Sarandon plays a drug dealer who Dafoe works for and she tells him that they both need to get out of dealing. She plans to open a legitimate cosmetics business and seems capable of following through on the idea. She is the most in control of her life of the three main characters. Dana Delany plays Dafoe's former lover, who doesn't want anything to do with him because they were substance abusers together in the past. Although he's clean now, he still deals. But is her character as squeaky clean as she now proclaims to be? Dafoe needs to figure that out. Further tension comes about from the eroticism between Dafoe and Delany plus the growing potential for eroticism between Dafoe and Sarandon. Dafoe is absolutely wonderful in this film and becomes a major romantic and erotic dream figure for the viewer regardless of what the viewer thinks of him vis a vis the two women.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Greekfreak on June 10, 2003
Format: DVD
I can watch this film at the drop of a hat and not mind that I've seen it a million times. It's not my favourite film, and I have more than a few criticisms of it, but overall, it's one that I'm glad I own.
The acting is fine--Susan Sarandon and Willem Dafoe always are--and Dany Delany does a credible job, but the real star is the screenplay, which was written by the director Paul Schrader. It's endlessly quotable, realistic, funny, and at times thought-provoking.
The soundtrack is marred by having the same no-name singer (who's trying so desperately to ape Bryan Ferry) all throughout--and I thought Vonda Sheppard was lousy--but the incidental music is nice.
Completely overlooked, and well worth the rental.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By JD Schaefer on January 16, 2002
Format: DVD
Willem Dafoe (John) is a reformed junky with a conscience, delivering drugs for an upscale dealer played superbly by Susan Sarandon (Ann). John works dispassionately during the night and without anything to believe in, visits psychics, to try to give meaning to the life he sees changing as Ann trys to go legit with a cosmetics business. Not having saved much and not having another trade, John senses a climax coming; he doesn't know in what form it will appear, but he's not backing away from it.
Women associated with the main drug buying client are dying, apparent suicides and when the last one has a very personal connection to John (Dana Delany - very well acted although the character isn't developed sufficiently), it sets up the violent climax to the movie. John almost welcomes the outcome as his dispair worsens and jail or death wouldn't be an unwelcome change.
The direction is uniquely Shrader. The characters are very well actualized (with the noted excption above). The performances are amazing which should come as no surprise considering the professional abilities of all. The mood remains constant while the soundtrack suits the movie without appealing excessively to only one generation as many do. The visuals as shown in the subdued and grainy colors enhance the overall impact this movie has. This movie is more about a life style than plot driven. The characters are all in denial about the changes in the world to which they need to adapt if they want to survive. It addresses survivorship of those who didn't plan the next phase of their life very well, have been getting by on their wits, but are finding a changing world no longer respects the decreasingly marketable skills those wits once represented.
While not an uplifting movie, it stays with you and is definitely recommended.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By "lexo-2" on July 23, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
Anyone who's seen Willem Dafoe onstage doesn't need to be convinced that the man is a great actor; unfortunately, his film career has been at best patchy. Light Sleeper's one of his best, though, and since Paul Schrader is a man who hasn't been allowed to make as many films as he deserved, it's a pleasure to see both on such good form.
It's one of Schrader's by now sort-of-trademarked studies in urban loneliness, out of noir via Bresson. Dafoe is beautifully quiet and understated as the drug-dealing hero, Sarandon is as excellent as ever and Dana Delany is extremely good as Dafoe's hapless, tragic ex-lover - a very pleasant surprise to one who hadn't been wildly impressed with her female-Alan-Alda trip on the interminable TV series China Beach. Just goes to show that you can mistake bad scripts for bad performances.
It has to be said the final scene is a rip-off twice over - not only is it almost identical to the final scene in American Gigolo, each are all but indistinguishable from the final scene in Robert Bresson's "Pickpocket" (and since Schrader's book "Transcendental Style in Film" was partly about Bresson, I think we can assume that a hommage of sorts is going on here.) Still, respect to Schrader for showing that there was fight in him yet. He went on to make the mighty "Affliction", so clearly the man is not yet ready to bow out. Even a sub-standard Schrader film (I'm thinking of "Patty Hearst") has a lot more soul and imagination than anything by Roland Emmerich.
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