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Like a Hurricane: The Indian Movement from Alcatraz to Wounded Knee Paperback – September 1, 1997

ISBN-13: 978-1565844025 ISBN-10: 1565844025 Edition: 8.2.1997

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Like a Hurricane: The Indian Movement from Alcatraz to Wounded Knee + Boarding School Seasons: American Indian Families, 1900-1940 (North American Indian Prose Award) + Indians in Unexpected Places (Culture America)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: The New Press; 8.2.1997 edition (September 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1565844025
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565844025
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.2 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #155,793 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

This highly readable history documents three turbulent years in the history of Native America, beginning in the early winter of 1969, when a few dozen activists occupied Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay. The American Indian Movement became prominent by that action, and Chaat and Warrior chart its fortunes through the three years culminating in both Nixon's reelection and the siege at Wounded Knee, South Dakota, where armed AIM sympathizers held off federal agents for eight weeks. The period between Alcatraz and Wounded Knee, the authors write, "was for American Indians every bit as significant as the counterculture was for young whites, or the civil rights movement for blacks." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

At the outset of this detailed, lively history of the American Indian protest movement in the early 1970s, its authors say that a problem with most other books on Indians (they do not use the term Native Americans) is that they were not written by Indians themselves and that, however sympathetic, they tend to portray Indians as victims and pawns. Smith, described as an activist by the publisher, and Warrior, a professor of history at Stanford, both Indians, have chosen to write about a brief period?the birth and early days of the American Indian Movement (AIM)?when American Indians were indeed politically and socially active. The book focuses on three Indian protests?the 1969 invasion and 19-month occupation of Alcatraz Island; the 1972 seizure and trashing of the Bureau of Indian Affairs Building in Washington (renamed Native American Embassy for the occasion); and, a year later, the two-month occupation of Wounded Knee, North Dakota, that ended with two dead and 300 Indians under indictment (which effectively bankrupted AIM). Smith and Warrior write clearly and dramatically; they have researched and interviewed well; and although unabashed partisans of the Indian cause, they are frank and even-handed to a point that might be painful to AIM diehards. An important addition to the history of a political movement that has yet to reach its stride. Photos.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Nevertheless, excellent background work and a fantastic piece of qualitative research.
Tim Hundsdorfer
This book is a fabulous overview of a widely ignored and/or distorted movement in American and Indian history.
margyn@hotmail.com
I felt this book was a great synopsis of the events of the Indian rights movement of the 60's and 70's.
"zarings3"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By "zarings3" on June 29, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I knew nothing about any of the events depicted in this book. They had been referenced in some other readings I had completed so I was seeking out more information. I felt this book was a great synopsis of the events of the Indian rights movement of the 60's and 70's. I was disappointed in the lack of information on Leonard Peltier and his situation. I wanted the book to continue for a few more years! I think it is sad that the general public has forgotten, so quickly, what occurred during this time. I was born in 1965 and I think once this movement was waning from the media, it was quickly forgotten by the majority of Americans, which is sad. I would recommend this book to anyone searching to understand the plight of the Native Americans today and the history of their search for freedom and the right to exist as they choose.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By ruble@ems.att.com on September 8, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book picks up where Dee Brown's Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee leaves off. I was afraid when I ordered this book that it would be too politically technical, but it wasn't at all. It really held my interest right from the beginning. It's the first insight that I've really been exposed to about the Native American Civil Rights Movement. The authors really tried to be as unbiased as possible by not only exposing the deceit of the US Government, but by also exposing the weaknesses and mistakes within the Native American factions who were originally involved in the early movement. After reading this book, my wish is that some day I'd love to have dinner with Dennis Banks and Russell Means. What interesting conversation and stories they could tell!!! What true (Native) American heroes they are!
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Tim Hundsdorfer on December 20, 1999
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As suggested by the title, Like a Hurricane is a dedicated history of the struggle for Native American rights. It covers the formative period, including the takeover at Alcatraz and the BIA building in Washington. It does a great job of stringing the events together and showing causes and effects.
This book is generally for those interested in modern Native American History, government tactics for derailing racial movements and people in need of background for dealing with the plethora of Native American activists communities.
I really enjoyed Like a Hurricane, but my only qualification is that the epilogue of Wounded Knee seems incomplete. What about the disappearances and murders of AIM members and supporters in the wake of WK? Given all the extraneous biographies the book covers, why not a little more depth on the aftermath of the central event? Understanding Peltier's situation (which was alluded to) requires an understanding of the context of violence and repression on Pine Ridge following the WK uprising. Nevertheless, excellent background work and a fantastic piece of qualitative research.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Hurley VINE VOICE on October 31, 2002
Format: Paperback
Well written book by Native Americans who write an objective history of the 60's style Indian movement that merged into Dennis Banks' American Indian Movement. The first section about the Alcatraz take over is very informative about the Bureau of Indian Affairs plan to move Indians off the reservation to assimilate them in Cities. Unfortunately, many of the Indians that relocated off the reservation ended up in their own Ghettos in poverty. However, these urban Indians such as the Mohawk Russell Oakes get personally involved in the take over of Alcatraz. The authors define well how the plans to take over landmarks comes about, the value of publicity and they bluntly
describe the failures in organization. The failures botch attempts to take Ellis Island and leave the Trail of Tears caravan virtually without shelter which inadvertently results in the take over of the BIA building. Unfortunately, the movement seems to falter with acts of vandalism, burning of a building in Custer, South Dakota and the destructiuon of buldings at the seige of Wounded knee and the unfortunate circumstance of kidnapping. The damage to property, reports of alchol abuse such as the get together in Warrenton, VA. undermines the movement in my mind. Thse acts seemed to diminish the goals of the Indian Movement although the authors make a point that even Martin Luther King could not control all the elements of his movement. Although the actions of AIM do obtian publicity and sympathy for their movement, the authors ironically note that their followers never materialize in large numbers. The book peaks with the reoccupation of Wounded Knee that succeeds as a great reminder of the mistreatment Indians in the past and invoking tribal rivalry between the current council President and AIM.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By deveryf@iastate.edu on October 30, 1998
Format: Paperback
The book is good, but it does not include anything on the much-needed social programs started by or with help from the American Indian Movement. For example, The Legal Rights Center, Heart of The Earth Survival School, Red School House, International Indian Treaty Council, Little Earth of United Tribes housing project, Women of All Red Nations, American Indian Opportunities Industrialization Center (AIOIC), Anishinaabe Akeeng, National Coalition on Racism in Sports & Media, and the Elaine Stately Peacemaker Youth Center, etc. These are just the programs begun in the Twin Cities of Minnesota, not to mention others around the country. In most books about AIM, not just this one, alot is said about the headline-making occupations and trials, but nothing is mentioned about the equally, if not more important social service work done by AIM. Readers should know this about AIM too. Thank you. Megwech.
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