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Comment: 1956 Hardcover 0th Edition illus. . ix, 226 p. Scuffed, worn, and may be written in, but everything is still there and ready to read!100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
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Like one of the family;: Conversations from a domestic's life Hardcover – 1956


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 226 pages
  • Publisher: Independence Publishers; First Edition edition (1956)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0007DV1V2
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,067,246 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“A novel that proves that humor can be the deadliest of weapons..If power were based on worth, Mildred would be running ther nation, not claeaning someone else’s house.” –Women’s Review of Books

Like One of the Family celebrates the image of black women most common to their history and suggests they are no less dignified for having spent time on their knees. Mildred scrubs and soars.” –From the introduction by Trudier Harris --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Alice Childress was born in Charleston, South Carolina, and raised an educated in Harlem. She pursued a variety of jobs, including assistant machinist, photo retoucher, saleslady, and insurance agent as she worked relentlessly to gain audiences for her work as a playwright, actress, and novelist. She also did domestic work for a few months; the day she quit she surprised her employer by throwing her keys at her head. The woman later asked her to return to work. This "only work" that Childress could find turned out to be valuable, for it provided her with firsthand experience of the job situation she would later depict in Like One of the Family. Her works include numerous plays including the Obie-Award Winning Trouble in Mind, as well as books for young adults such as A Hero Ain't Nothin' but a Sandwich. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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The book had me laughing out loud.
Harriet
It is written in an easy and simple language with a good dose of humour, even though it conveys very complex and insightful thoughts.
Anna Triandafyllidou
A college professor required me to read this book.
Carla Jackson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Carla Jackson on July 24, 2000
Format: Paperback
Like One of the Family by Alice Childress is an excellent book. It reminds me of the stories that my mother use to and quite often still do tell me. My mother use to be a maid some 35 years ago. Some of the stories shared in the book are similiar to the stories that my mom tells me about quite frequently. This book makes me laugh and cry. I can truly feel the characters joys and pains. It transcends me back to a time that I can only relate to by storytelling. A college professor required me to read this book. I have read it more than two times and quite often refer back to it for a connection with my ancestors. I often share some of the stories with my mom. She's often amazed at how an artist was able to put such honesty and realization in text. I salute Alice Childress!
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Format: Paperback
The monologues are timeless, make great read-aloud events, and stick in my mind, rising to the surface unbidden when things in my experience are worthy of Alice Childress's insights. I've read the book half a dozen times in the last 25+ years and it never has failed me as a source of pleasure, delight, insight,and healing. It shocked me at first but no longer does. It made me both more cynical and more loving. I first encountered Childress' work in Mary Ann Ferguson's brilliant and important anthology IMAGES OF WOMEN IN LITERATURE which includes a single monologue from this book -- the one about the women's purses. That led me to look for the whole book which I finally found via interlibrary loan. I was absolutely thrilled when Beacon reprinted it. I will always be grateful to Ferguson for leading me to Childress and always grateful to Beacon for making it possible for me to give this book as a gift to so many who needed to read it. Every February at our African-American literature read-in, we read at least one of these monologues -- but reading one usually leads to requests for another, and then another. My favorites change from year to year. Another one of these monologues is reprinted in the SIGNET CLASSIC BOOK OF SOUTHERN SHORT STORIES. I imagine some of them are in various collections of scenes to read aloud. This is literature that must never again be lost or go out of print. The wit,the poignancy, the wisdom of these monologues will become part of your DNA.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Anna Triandafyllidou on June 30, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent book, and although it refers to the experiences of black women in the US of the 1950s, it is revealing of contemporary experiences of many immigrant women of Latino or European origin that work as maids in Europe and North America. The book is a series of short stories that each has its own 'morale'. It is written in an easy and simple language with a good dose of humour, even though it conveys very complex and insightful thoughts. A great reading for any age from adolescence upwards. Highly recommended for people who have been on either side of the coin (i.e. as domestic workers or as employers).
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