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  • Li'l Abner
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Li'l Abner


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DVD-R Note: This product is manufactured on demand when ordered from Amazon.com. [Learn more]


Frequently Bought Together

Li'l Abner + Li'l Abner + Li'l Abner (1956 Original Broadway Cast)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Buster Keaton
  • Directors: Albert Rogell
  • Writers: Charles Kerr
  • Producers: Vogue Prods.
  • Format: NTSC
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Studio: Desert Island Films
  • DVD Release Date: June 8, 2011
  • Run Time: 78 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00551WUQ6
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #610,754 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

The goings-on in the rural Southern community of Dogpatch, USA.

This product is manufactured on demand using DVD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.

Customer Reviews

They were the stars of the 1959 LI'L ABNER movie, which is coming out soon from Paramount Home Video.
Mark Evanier
Martha O'Driscoll is merely acceptable as Daisy Mae, but Billie Seward strikes all the right notes as the man-hungry Cousin Delightful.
Gary F. Taylor
The heading for this film says: Starring: Peter Palmer, Leslie Parrish It is also on the cover, showing their names.
Andrew R. Gassmann

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Mark Evanier on January 6, 2005
Format: DVD
The box cover of this DVD says it stars Peter Palmer and Leslie Parrish. Nope. They were the stars of the 1959 LI'L ABNER movie, which is coming out soon from Paramount Home Video. The film on this DVD is the 1940 version which does not have either Palmer or Parrish. Whoever designed the cover of this DVD got them confused.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Andrew R. Gassmann on May 20, 2005
Format: DVD
The heading for this film says:

Starring: Peter Palmer, Leslie Parrish

It is also on the cover, showing their names.

But it is a B/W copy of a much older version with Jeff York and Martha Driscoll.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By RARE_BARGAINS on January 16, 2005
Format: DVD
HERE'S THE DEAL, THE FRONT COLOR LISTS THE COLOR VERSION STARS WHILE THE BACK OF THE INSERT LISTS THE B/W 1940'S VERSION STARS. THE DVD IS THE BLACK & WHITE 1940'S VERSION WITH JEFF YORK, BILLED AS GRANVILLE OWEN AND MARTHA O'DRISCOLL. TRANSFER QUALITY IS VERY GOOD NEAR EXCELLENT.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By R. C. Walker on March 21, 2010
Format: DVD
"Li'l Abner" was originally filmed in a visual aspect of 1.33:1, as were all TV films and programs of the time. This shady outfit offers you a version that's 16:9. Now, how do you suppose they did that? There's 2 ways and either one is a mutilation of the original film.

First, you can cut off the top and bottom of each frame. This is the way many "widescreen" films were made immediately after 1953. Converting to 16:9 will lose about 1/3 of the image. You want to pay full price for only 2/3 of the film?

Second, you can expand the image to the widescreen aspect. This means everyone and everything is bloated. Try it yourself: while watching anything that's 1.33:1, use your controller to convert the screen to the wide aspect. If you like what you see -- say, Humphry Bogart looking like Sidney Greenstreet -- then maybe this travesty is for you -- assuming they didn't just chop it to pieces.

Please note they don't even bother to tell you how they do the deed. They don't want you to find out how they butchered this film. These people are not doing you a service. They're trying to capitalize on the widespread and utterly stupid fear of black bars on the TV screen. "This picture has been modified to fit your screen." What a bunch of irrational hogwash. If you're afraid of black bars, maybe TV isn't for you. There's always radio: it ALWAYS fits your screen.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Gary F. Taylor HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 15, 2005
Format: DVD
Al Capp's cartoon strip was so satirically acidic that he was constantly being threatened with suit by the public figures he parodied--and at least one, Joan Baez, actually took him to court. But viewers needn't expect much of Capp's celebrated wit in this 1940 cinematic take on the much celebrated residents of Dogpatch, USA; more silly than clever and more embarassing than entertaining, L'IL ABNER has been justly neglected for more than a half a century.

Still, it does have a few charms, and most of these are among the cast. Director Albert S. Rogell was a workhorse of the silent era, and the film is crammed to overflowing with a host of silent actors taking one more shot at fame--with the great Buster Keaton the most celebrated name on the roster. Sad to say, they are largely wasted, but we're at least given a chance to see them once more, a decade after their stars faded.

The most successful members of the cast are actually the younger players, with Jeff York (billed as Granville Owen) unexpectedly effective in actually looking the part of L'il Abner himself. Martha O'Driscoll is merely acceptable as Daisy Mae, but Billie Seward strikes all the right notes as the man-hungry Cousin Delightful. And now and then a moment "pops" enough for you to see a little of what made Capp's concepts so wickedly funny.

The plot is standard Capp, but it lacks Capp's bite: Daisy Mae loves Abner, Cousin Delightful wants him for herself, and Abner prefers porkchops. In terms of production values, the film was very obviously done on the cheap, and Rogell's direction is hardly inspired: not only is the camera static, the pace is positively leaden.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By rsoonsa VINE VOICE on April 24, 2006
Format: DVD
When LI'L ABNER was made, in 1940, Al Capp's comic strip of the same name was one of the U.S.'s favorites, with his hayseed creation finding himself in one jam after the other, without trying at all. A story by Capp is the foundation for this film, which holds a unique spot in cinema history, as it is the only attempt to precisely recreate comic illustration, utilizing makeup, costumes and exact phrasing (without interpretation). The plot and subplots generally revolve about the annual Sadie Hawkins Day celebration in Dogpatch, which presents area females with just about their only opportunity to catch a husband, by literally running down and snaring one of the town's fleeing bachelors. For those who remember the silent film era, this effort provides small roles for many pre-talkie stalwarts, including Buster Keaton, Edgar Kennedy, Chester Conklin, Al St. John, Lucien Littlefield, Hank Mann and Edward Brady. At times very reminiscent of Capp's drawing, the very tall Jeff York, billed as Granville Owen, is effective as Abner. Martha O'Driscoll, Kay Sutton and Billie Seward, as the three women most vigorously seeking marriage with Abner, do their hearty best with the thin scenario. More silly than cute, this picture is not marked by outstanding work from cast and crew, its significance coming only from the mentioned verisimilitude.
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