Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Lincoln Takes Command Paperback – May, 1991


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$22.50
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Bill Coats Ltd; 2 Revised edition (May 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0931709032
  • ISBN-13: 978-0931709036
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,270,062 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Curtis B. Hasty on May 11, 2001
Format: Paperback
I am glad to see that this book has been republished after almost half a century. In this book, Tilley goes about showing Lincoln's true role in starting the War Between the States.

It is a known fact that Lincoln's election led t0 the secession of the Southern States, but this work goes about showing how Lincoln used every device at his disposal to lure the Confederate States into firing the first shots of the war.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Lamont G. Sible Jr. on July 8, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book should be a MUST for anyone wanting to learn, or understand Lincoln's role in the Fort Sumter/Civil War situation. John Tilley must have spent years researching this.
What Mr. Tilley does in the book, is describe the pieces to the puzzle; then explain how they all fit together. It's an amazing book.
What most Civil War historians miss is Lincoln's letter of 12 December 1860, ( this rather shows Lincoln's assumption to interfere in governmental affairs, even though he was still a civilian--voted in, but not taken the oath of inauguration 4 March 61--, and questions a belief in undermining the current President Buchanan.)-----From this book you read---->
--> Lincoln had sent to E.B. Washburne [ 12 Dec 1860 ],for secret transmittal to George Winfield Scott, commanding General of the army, this message: ---"Please present my respects to the General, and tell him confidentially, I shall be obliged to him to be as well prepared as he can to either hold or retake the Forts, as the case may require, at and after the inauguration."---
Primary Source: Nicolay and Hay, Lincoln III, page 250 ( see also)
Robert McNutt McElroy, "Jefferson Davis; the Unreal and the Real", I, page 278
( did you notice the word, "secret"!)
This book quotes the O.R., the O.R.N., The Diary of Gideon Wells, "The Genesis of the Civil War" by Crawford, amongst a host of other sources.
Tilley totally debunks the "Starving Garrison" story that was fabricated for the Northern newspapers, to build support for the war. Example---
By Anderson's own figures he had enough provisions on hand to last his garrison, until April 26th.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By kernelp on October 3, 2012
Format: Paperback
From the Forward by Avery Craven, University of Chicago, "There may still be some room for honest difference of opinion, the day for patriotic acceptance of inherited historical ideas is gone."

If there was ever a book that represented the smoking gun for the cause of the War For Southern Independence, "Lincoln Takes Command" is it. Through exhaustive research Tilley shows from the official records of the war gathered by the Union the background and actions of the players.

The scenario portrayed by most historians is a petulant and hotheaded Confederacy while the Union appears patient and long suffering. The book begins at Ft. Pickens, FLA. There was an armistice between the South and the North. The agreement stipulated that there would be no reinforcement of Pickens unless threatened by Confederate forces. The Confederacy agreed not to assault the fort unless it was reinforced. This truce, acknowledged by all parties, was broken by Lincoln when Pickens was reinforced without provocation. When called to account for this provocation by the U.S. Senate Lincoln made report of a "rumor of a quasi-armistice" a blatant lie.

The really big lie by historians is the attack on Ft. Sumter. The first act of war was committed in January 1861. Buchanan ordered the steamer Star of the West to reinforce Sumter with 200 soldiers, supplies and ammunition. The warship Brooklyn accompanied the steamer. The orders for the combatants were to remain hidden throughout the movement through Charleston harbor. The South Carolina defense forces became aware of the mission, fired on the Star of the West forcing her away. Historians say she was unarmed.

The whole period of the so-called siege of Sumter was characterized by friendship and comity between the forces.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Only-A-Child VINE VOICE on July 26, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This is a 1991 reprint of a book first published back in 1941. The author, John Shipley Tilley, was a lawyer in Montgomery, Alabama who got inspired in the 1940's to make a case for the south having being a victim of clever Yankee manipulation in the months just before the Civil War and of a distorted image by northern sympathizing historians after the war. His 1941 book "Lincoln Takes Command" was his first of several apologist attempts at recasting the South's position before, during, and after the war.

The central thesis of this book being that Lincoln tricked the South into firing the first shots of the war (if one ignores the shots that were fired at the "Star of the West" expedition in relief of Fort Sumter two months before Lincoln took office). Tilley laments that the South has traditionally been blamed for the war; attempts to show that war was Lincoln's real agenda, and asserts that this possibility has not been adequately examined because the less than impartial victors wrote the traditional history of the conflict. Nothing much is made of the three months of northern inactivity after Fort Sumter, where Mr. Lincoln's only significant military action was the repulse of the South's invasion of still loyal western Virginia.

Indeed, Tilley's entire focus is to blame Lincoln for the war. And to do so he must totally ignore that it was in fact Buchanan (a southern sympathizing Democrat) who drew the line in the sand that would lead to war. In his last annual message Buchanan stated that secession was unequivocally unconstitutional and that exclusive control over forts and other federal properties in any given state belonged to the national government. Weak and vacillating as Buchanan was, he found a line from which at his weakest and most timid he would not retreat.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again