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Lincoln


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Lincoln
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Audio CD, July 1, 1993
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Biography

They Might Be Giants are an original band from Brooklyn, New York founded by John Flansburgh and John Linnell and including Dan Miller on guitar, Danny Weinkauf on bass, and Marty Beller, the king of the drums. TMBG works continuously — writing, recording, or touring. They Might Be Giants have also been involved in numerous television and film projects.

They Might Be ... Read more in Amazon's They Might Be Giants Store

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (July 1, 1993)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Restless Records
  • ASIN: B000003BIP
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #24,301 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Ana Ng
2. Cowtown
3. Lie Still, Little Bottle
4. Purple Toupee
5. Cage & Aquarium
6. Where Your Eyes Don't Go
7. Piece Of Dirt
8. Mr. Me
9. Pencil Rain
10. The World's Address
11. I've Got A Match
12. Santa's Beard
13. You'll Miss Me
14. They'll Need A Crane
15. Shoehorn With Teeth
16. Stand On Your Own Head
17. Snowball In Hell
18. Kiss Me, Son Of God

Customer Reviews

Lincoln is one of the best Tmbg albums.
Geodude
There's lots of playful dorky lyrics and off-kilter, weird, catchy music.
Ryan Hennessy
Now my kids love TMBG and begged me to buy it.
Zoe Banchieri

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Ryan Hennessy on June 14, 2002
Format: Audio CD
I bought this CD right as my TMBG obsession started getting into full swing. It must've been 1996 right after I got a CD player that I got Lincoln soon after the Big Blue Dog. Having much in common with the first song, it's another huge pile of inspired lunacy. What makes Lincoln so much better than the debut album is that the song are more polished and it basically sounds like more time was spent on the production. For trivia's sake, the first album was produced in a studio largely after midnight after it closed because the two Johns of TMBG knew a guy who worked there. It saved them a lot of money, but they had to work while on a lot of coffee, and at any given time one of the Johns or the producer Bill Krauss would usually be sleeping on the couch.
On Lincoln, Linnell and Flansburgh seem to have a lot more time on their hands to perfect things. This album actually made them the best-selling independent band ever since they resided on the Bar-None label. The album starts with its high-point, "Ana Ng." The premise is way out there: A man laments because he thinks that his true love resides on the exact opposite side of the earth from him and that she just missed her one day at the 1964 World's Fair. The point is made clear though. Everyone has their match, but some never find theirs. Everything that makes John Linnell my favorite songwriter comes together in the verse "They don't need me here and I know you're there / Where the world goes by like the humid air / And it sticks like a broken record / Everything sticks like a broken record." This is definitely one of my favorite songs ever.
"Ana Ng" is actually so great that it casts a shadow over the rest of the album even though the rest of the album is great.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 20, 1998
Format: Audio CD
First, let me say that I think that this is one of the pinnacles of American recorded music. And I'm not just saying that because I, like John and John, am a Massachusetts-to-Brooklyn transplant. It's completely accessible, fun, eclectic, weird and intelligent. What gets me the most, though, is the darkness of the lyrics. That's right, the DARKNESS. It's interesting to read people's comments about how meaningless (although fun) TMBG's music is. Listen carefully. "Kiss Me Son of God" is an amazingly concise and effective skewering of religion. "Where Your Eyes Don't Go" is a dead-on depiction of paranoia. "Lie Still Little Bottle" is about drug dependency. And "They'll Need a Crane" is, I think, the saddest song that I have ever heard. The way that J&J bury the line "...and I don't love you anymore..." in the middle of the phonecallers' harangue to his girlfriend just tears my heart out. Moments like this pass almost unnoticed and that slyness is what distinguishes TMBG from other bands that use humor but lack the depth, yes, the DEPTH of this incredible band.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 6, 1999
Format: Audio CD
This is, in my humble opinion, the best thing They Might Be Giants ever did -- and that's really saying something, because they've made several excellent albums. It's a typical TMBG disc in that it's funny, catchy, twisted, and like nothing else you've ever heard. "Ana Ng" is an absolute classic. "Purple Toupee" is probably the catchiest song I've ever heard, and would blow Mariah Carey right off the charts in a perfect world. John and John have the uncanny ability to make music that is completely insane, yet curiously accessible. If you want the perfect TMBG introduction, get "Lincoln." And then do yourself a favor: get the rest of them, too.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Gena Chereck on January 10, 2003
Format: Audio CD
After he ceded the spotlight to They Might Be Giants bandmate/co-founder John Flansburgh on their eclectic self-titled 1986 debut, Linnell comes into his own on this more polished and focused 1988 followup, Lincoln (as in Massechusetts, not Nebraska!). His nasal twang may not be as versatile as Flansy's slightly less-nasal voice, but it's more distinctive; Linnell's contributions to this disc -- generally more consistent than those of his partner -- are insanely catchy, exquisitely crafted pop-rock gems. "Ana Ng" is a moving tale of unrequited love that rocks like crazy; "Where Your Eyes Don't Go" is a disturbingly catchy ode to paranoia. The anthemic "Purple Toupee" is about how a fellow born in 1959 or '60 tries to interpret the major events of the '60s, with humorous and irreverent results. The gentle "I've Got a Match" ("...your embrace and my collapse") is a vaguely dark song about falling out of love; the rollicking "They'll Need a Crane," in its depiction of an unhappy couple beyond hope or help, uses the poignant imagery of a home literally being torn down. He even comes up with an inspired guilty pleasure in "Pencil Rain" (think war imagery with refs to "lead," "splintered wood," and "number two"). The best of the lot is "Kiss Me, Son of God," a lovely pop ballad taking aim at religious cults and the corruption that comes with any position of power ("I built a little empire out of some crazy garbage called the blood of the exploited working class / But they've overcome their shyness, now they're calling me 'Your Highness'"); the sparse instrumentation and Flansburgh's harmonies bring an undercurrent of melancholy to Linnell's biting wit and acerbic lead vocal.
That's not to say that Flansburgh doesn't have his moments here.
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