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Lincolnites and Rebels: A Divided Town in the American Civil War Paperback – June 29, 2009

ISBN-13: 978-0195393934 ISBN-10: 0195393937

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (June 29, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195393937
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195393934
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,104,926 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"Lincolnites and Rebels is based on a vast array of original source material, and it is well organized and well written. Knoxville's Civil War story is full of economic and sociopolitical twists and turns and interesting, opinioned characters. McKenzie does an outstanding job of bringing all facets of this narrative together."--Ben Wynne, The North Carolina Historical Review


"Robert Tracy McKenzie's excellent study of wartime Knoxville reinforces that recent scholarship with exhaustive research and interpretive verve.... Lincolnites and Rebels deserves to find an audience among all scholars of the war, not just those who look to the mountains."--Kenneth W. Noe, Civil War History


"This thoughtful work unquestionably reaches important new conclusions."--John Cimprich, American Historical Review


"McKenzie vividly portrays Knoxville as a microcosm of the Civil War as a brothers' war, dividing families, friends, and neighbors.... An excellent contribution to the socio-political understanding of border state communities in the Civil War. From the pages of Licolnites and Rebels emerges a clear image of a complex issue underlying the heart of the Civil War. The division of a nation would not be, indeed could not be, accomplished with surgical precision."--Sharon A. Roger Hepburn, Reviews in American History


"An unusually well written, solid, scholarly study, filled with colorful vignettes.... Highly recommended."--CHOICE


"Knoxville, Tennessee, in the 1860s was a deeply divided town in a deeply divided region, a place where the dictates of conscience collided repeatedly with the constraints of power. Tracy McKenzie has brilliantly illuminated the complex issues of loyalty and dissent in the Civil War South. This book is essential reading for anyone who seeks a richer understanding not only of the Civil War but also of the moral crisis faced by people of any time or place who find themselves living under enemy rule."--Stephen V. Ash, University of Tennessee


"An important addition to our understanding of the Civil War in the Appalachian South.... It appears unlikely to this reviewer that this study will be superseded."--Gordon McKinney, Civil War Book Review


"Tracy McKenzie's compelling story of neighbor against neighbor in Knoxville, Tennessee, during the Civil War goes right to the heart of questions about allegiance. In this strategic southern city--a commercial center in a major food producing region, a railroad center with connections to both the eastern and western theaters of war--the white residents were split almost 50/50 between the Union and the Confederacy. A vivid portrait of human anguish and conflict, a civil war inside a civil war."--Vernon Burton, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


"No other community in the Confederate South was perceived to be as much of a Unionist stronghold as was Knoxville, Tennessee. Yet it defies such easy categorization, as Tracy McKenzie demonstrates in this richly detailed portrait of an Appalachian populace that remained sharply divided throughout the Civil War and beyond. He not only provides an insightful case study of antebellum and wartime loyalties and the range of forces that shaped them; he also tells a very human story of people at war, and infuses it with an often palpable sense of drama and even suspense."--John C. Inscoe, University of Georgia


"This author's compelling portrait of Knoxville, Tennessee, during the Civil War is the very best sort of community study.... McKenzie's nuanced monograph deserves wide attention from historians seeking to understand the meaning of loyalty in wartime and civilians' experience of the Cival War."--Alison Clark Efford, The Historian


"Illuminating and deeply researched...An excellent work of complexity and nuance." --The Tennessee Historical Quarterly


"A well-written book [that] should be read by everyone trying to understand the values held by communities and individuals that drove them to adopt a pro-Union or pro-Confederate belief and how those values changed as the war progressed."-Charles H. Bogart, Post Library


About the Author

Robert Tracy McKenzie is Associate Professor of History at Wheaton College. He is the author of One South or Many? Plantation Belt and Upcountry in Civil War-Era Tennessee, which received awards from the American Historical Association's Pacific Coast Branch and the Agricultural History Society.

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Customer Reviews

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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mike Miner on June 8, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Knoxville played a pivital role in the Civil War both on the battlefield, and politically. Why more isn't written on it is a mystery to me. Digby Seymour's pioneering "Divided Loyalties" has been the standard of years, now McKenzie has offered a wealth of more in depth studies where Seymour left off. The only real criticism that I have, is that I so wish that the author had made use of all the photographs that could have broken up the lengthy text more and given the reader a better visualization of an otherwise splendid text. "Divided Loyalties" would make a great companion piece if you don't have one already (the one published by The East Tennessee Historical Society being the best version printed).
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By J. C. Tumblin OD on May 21, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Professor McKenzie has published the definitive history of East Tennessee during the Civil War to compliment Temple, Humes and Seymour. Not since Dr. Digby Seymour's book, written for the Civil War Centennial Years (1961-65), has a book of this significance appeared. McKenzie explores fully both the events and the personalities of the period from the inimitable Unionist, "Parson" Brownlow, to the Secessionist, Dr. J.G.M. Ramsey. This is a "must have" for anyone studying the wartime history of a region so evenly split between North and South. Highly recommended!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Gerald Hedman on April 28, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Actual history that has all the makings of a pot-boiler novel. Knoxville and its citizens went through the Civil War mostly under the occupation of the Southern Army, then the final year occupied by the north, with great personal devastation and communal unrest.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. Zoellner on May 8, 2011
Format: Paperback
Lincolnites and Rebels is not a general history of the Civil War, rather, it tells about Knoxville Tennessee, which author Robert Tracy McKenzie calls a divided town. Within, he explores the history of the people there, and their unique and conflicting loyalties during that time. Almost all of the attitudes and political sympathies he describes are new to me, aside from those of rabid abolitionists and absolute slave-holding secessionists. McKenzie did a good job of explaining the middle ground and grey area occupied by union supporters who favored slavery and the mixed feelings of non-slave owning secessionists. This is not a book about war as seen by soldiers, but the way a civil war affects an ordinary town and the citizens living there.

McKenzie basically goes through events chronologically, beginning with reactions to Lincoln's campaign for the presidency till somewhere around the end of the war, including some of the reconstruction in less detail. Basically, it is a proper history, the kind used as reference material or in a class on the Civil War, but it isn't unreadably dry. There is a lot of speculation, and McKenzie is clear about the ways in which his research is inherently incomplete. Neither the Lincolnites nor the Rebels are portrayed as the better or worse parties in this book, especially given the overlap, but there was a bit more brutality reported during the union occupation compared to that of the confederacy. However, he makes it clear that tempers of all parties were far worse later into the war, which was when the union had control, than they had been at the outset. Throughout the book, he does a good job of this kind of explaining the how and why of what people felt and did at any point.
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By Carrie Stewart on January 13, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am glad to find out so much information that was not shared with us in the past. Good job.
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