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Lincoln's Battle with God: A President's Struggle with Faith and What It Meant for America MP3 CD – Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Unabridged


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Lincoln's Battle with God: A President's Struggle with Faith and What It Meant for America + The Wit and Wisdom of Abraham Lincoln: A Book of Quotations (Dover Thrift Editions)
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Product Details

  • MP3 CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; MP3 Una edition (November 6, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1469254433
  • ISBN-13: 978-1469254432
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.5 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (100 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,508,497 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Stephen Mansfield is a New York Times best-selling author and a popular speaker who is becoming one of the nation’s most respected voices on religion in American culture. He is the author of The Faith of George W. Bush, The Faith of the American Soldier, Then Darkness Fled: The Liberating Wisdom of Booker T. Washington, and Never Give In: The Extraordinary Character of Winston Churchill, among other works of history and biography. In 2008, Mansfield wrote The Faith of Barack Obama, which was an international bestseller and was celebrated in reviews as an objective look at Obama’s religious life and the controversies that surrounded it. Founder of both The Mansfield Group, a research and communications firm, and Chartwell Literary Group, which creates and manages literary projects, Stephen is also in wide demand as a lecturer and inspirational speaker

More About the Author

Stephen Mansfield is a New York Times bestselling author and a popular speaker who coaches leaders worldwide.

He first rose to global attention with his groundbreaking book "The Faith of George W. Bush," an enormous bestseller that Time magazine credited with shaping the 2004 U.S. presidential election. The book was also a source for Oliver Stone's award-winning film "W." Mansfield's "The Faith of Barack Obama" was another international bestseller. He has written celebrated biographies of Booker T. Washington, George Whitefield, Winston Churchill, Pope Benedict XVI and Abraham Lincoln, among others. Publishers Weekly has described his book, Killing Jesus, as "masterful." His recent "Mansfield's Book of Manly Men" has inspired men's events around the world.

Stephen speaks widely about men, leadership, the power of heritage, and the forces that shape modern culture. He is also an in-demand leadership coach whose firm, The Mansfield Group, offices in Washington D.C. just three blocks from the White House.

Mansfield lives in Nashville and Washington, D.C. with his wife Beverly, an award-winning songwriter and producer.

For more information, log on to StephenMansfield.TV.

Customer Reviews

Excellent, well written and enlightening.
Reynaldo R. Martinez
Stephen Mansfield presents Lincoln's faith in a very genuine way.
Howard Tan
Read this book just as I had watched Lincoln the movie.
RICHARD C. BRADEN

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

114 of 121 people found the following review helpful By George P. Wood TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 20, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Lincoln's Battle with God will disappoint two kinds of readers: secularists and Christian nationalists, both of whom want to claim America's sixteenth president as wholly their own. He is neither, however. As Stephen Mansfield writes, "The silencing of Lincoln's faith by the secular and the exaggerating of Lincoln's faith by the religious have given us a less accurate and a less engaging Lincoln. We are poorer for the distortions." Indeed we are, which is all the more reason to appreciate the accomplishment of Mansfield's book.

That accomplishment is the mapping of Abraham Lincoln's religious journey. The journey began in 1809 in Kentucky, whose frontier religion was shaped by the camp-meeting revivalism of Cane Ridge (1801). Lincoln's parents, Thomas and Nancy, were Hard Shell Baptists. Their religion was primitive, emotional, and fervent. Lincoln loved his mother, who died when he was 10. Whatever spiritual sensitivity he had seems to have come from her. But when he was emancipated from his father at age 21, Lincoln disavowed both the man and his God.

As Lincoln struck out on his own in New Salem, Illinois, he fell in with a group of freethinkers, devotees of Paine, Volney, and Burns. He was known as an "infidel" who referred to Jesus Christ as a "bastard" and delighted to point out the Bible's seeming contradictions in public debate. He went so far as to write a "little book on Infidelity" that his freethinking friends had the foresight to burn. This is the Lincoln secularists love and the religious loathe.

But infidelity was not Lincoln's final take on religion. A change of view began when Lincoln moved to Springfield, the capital of Illinois.
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49 of 52 people found the following review helpful By Lynn Green on November 8, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This book shares so many first-hand accounts, letters, and speeches, you begin to see Lincoln as a fully three-dimensional person, not just a character dropped into an historical setting. He was a man who wrestled with his faith rather than blindly accepting the religious mores of his time. Then again, it was a complicated time of social revolution and the mores were in flux. Our nation was fortunate to have a man leading her who would invest the thought and spiritual energy necessary to seek a deeper sense of justice than the convenient paths of his peers.

The greatest benefit of reading this book is that I will never hear the words of Lincoln with the same ear. I now understand the voice of this man and appreciate the life that formed those words. My respect is deeper than ever for a man who was not just a fine statesman but an honorable person.
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35 of 37 people found the following review helpful By andy85 on November 23, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
For those frustrated with a seemingly biased account of Lincoln's faith in so many current works on his life this book is a must read. I am not a huge Lincoln expert by any means. This was only the fourth book I've read on the man (along with viewing hours of recent History Channel specials). However I was always a little perplexed by the picture painted in most of what I watched and read. Basically I was lead to believe that Lincoln died as some sort of deist, and he definitely didn't believe in the divinity of Christ or the afterlife.

Based on contemporary accounts from the first part of his life I have no reason to doubt that he wasn't a Christian at that time. Neighbors in New Salem said he would read a Bible aloud for the sole purpose of showing it's error. And one neighbor heard him despair that he didn't think there was an afterlife after the death of his beloved Ann.

Now the picture painted by many current scholars goes something like this: in the desperation of Willie's death and the horror of the civil war Lincoln returned to the hyper-Calvinistic view of his childhood and admitted that God was controlling these events and he surrendered himself to this bleak reality and tried to make the best of it he could.

The major problem I've always had with this view is what I read in the writings and speeches of Lincoln himself during his White House years. I know that Lincoln was a politician and all politicians "play to the crowd" to some degree or another. But still something didn't seem to fit. I couldn't see how a man who wrote the Second Inaugural in which both Jesus and the Old Testament are quoted in the way that they are could at the same time not believe those words to be divinely inspired.
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39 of 42 people found the following review helpful By dbs on November 19, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I just finished Lincoln's Battle with God. From the first sentence to the last I was engrossed. I could barely put it down. The book is an amazing insight to the painful journey the greatest American President had on his way to dealing with a God that isn't always represented well by people. I am indebted to Stephen Mansfield for thoughtful look into the heart of a man who was at times tormented but accomplished so much for his country. I highly recommend this book for anyone that wants to get a more clear picture of who Abraham Lincoln was and how he viewed life.
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28 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Revolutionary Spirits on November 2, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Lincoln, the new Stephen Spielberg movie due out in theaters next week, will undoubtedly revive interest in the man--as opposed to the myth--of our greatest American President.

Not coincidentally, Stephen Mansfield has released a fresh biography of Lincoln's Battle With God (Thomas Nelson: Nashville, 2012) intended as a counterweight to previous works which portray Abe as a skeptic or freethinker in matters of faith.

Lincoln never joined a church during his lifetime. During his Springfield years, he was part of a debating society where he seemed to support the views of Tom Paine and other deists of the Enlightenment. He once called Jesus a bastard and Christ's mother a base woman. In an Illinois congressional race, he was dogged by charges of atheism and impiety. These facts are not disputed.

Mansfield, who is an alumnus of Oral Roberts University, doesn't deny that Lincoln rejected organized religion as a young man. But he argues that under the assault of life-changing losses (the death of two sons and the carnage of war) Lincoln experienced something close to a complete conversion: to belief in a personal God accessible through prayer. He opens his book with widow Mary Todd Lincoln's remembrance, years after the fact, that her husband's dying wish as he bled to death from an assassin's bullet was to walk in the footsteps of his savior. All the other tangled threads of Lincoln's lifetime lead to this uplifting finale.

To his credit, Mansfield realizes that first person accounts of Lincoln's religious life--whether from Mary, his law partner William Herndon, or the various Protestant ministers who sought to befriend him and claim the President as one of their own--need to be taken with a grain of salt. Sources are not always reliable.
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