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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very deep and delectable, but not for the uninitiated.
I've finished reading LINK two nights ago, and while on my way to the library to return the book, I could not get my mind off the concepts exposed in the book.

While Mr. Beiswanger is a good story teller, he is not a very accomplished writer, but that holds true for many writers (Charles Dickens, Philip K. Dick, Thomas Harris, etc), so this book is definitely...
Published on September 9, 2012 by Lupucillo

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392 of 457 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Beiswenger Owes Alan Hathaway Royalties
Published in 1981, the short story "They Died Twice" by Alan Hathaway included, among other things, a machine developed for the express purpose of delving into ancestral memories. "Link" is a clear rip-off of this now 31 year old classic tale. While this reviewer would nominally ignore such things as there is no such thing as a new idea, the author's insistence of suing a...
Published on April 19, 2012 by Amazon Customer


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392 of 457 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Beiswenger Owes Alan Hathaway Royalties, April 19, 2012
This review is from: Link (Paperback)
Published in 1981, the short story "They Died Twice" by Alan Hathaway included, among other things, a machine developed for the express purpose of delving into ancestral memories. "Link" is a clear rip-off of this now 31 year old classic tale. While this reviewer would nominally ignore such things as there is no such thing as a new idea, the author's insistence of suing a company for essentially the same thing he did in 2003 deserves a low rating.

EDIT:

As an addendum to the above explanation, as many sites throughout he blogosphere and tumblrverse quoting my wording misunderstand the content and message. In no way am I accusing Mr. Beiswenger of stealing or otherwise plagiarizing "They Died Twice". The purpose was to demonstrate that creative minds can, and frequently do, create works with plot devices that are remarkably similar to one another. Ancient societies have creation stories that are similar to one another in ways that almost indicate that such creation stories could be true. For example, the Maya have story elements that could be confused for the Biblical story of Noah's Ark despite the two cultures never having come in contact until thousands of years after the stories were originally developed. "They Died Twice" was selected as it is an incredibly obscure book that Mr. Beiswenger could not have possibly known about. The only references I've been able to find on this book were a 12 year old defunct website that provided a short summary of the story and, when doing research to find out the publication of the story, was only able to find reference of it in a book called "Literary Afterlife: The Posthumous Continuations of Author's Fictional Characters". In other words, an obscure website and a book referencing what could possibly make "They Died Twice" professional fanfic. Because of the confusing content of "Literary Afterlife" and how it lists works, I'm not sure if "They Died Twice" is a continuation of a work from November 1942, and if it is, when the various genetic memory themes an other elements present in Link were originated in this universe, so I defaulted to 1981. If it was in 1942, it only makes the point more poignant. Mr. Beiswenger independently developed the concept of utilizing a machine to seek information on genetic memory to solve a present issue (what other purpose would it have?) and combined it with another common and ancient theme of using science to better understand God and religion. Nothing particularly new here.

I used "They Died Twice" because pointing out the same plots and themes from major greats like Edgar Rice Borroughs or Frank Herbert, or on pop-science during the 1800s that did attempt to decode human ancestral memory through our genes as well as psychological research performed by individuals such as the great Carl Jung, would have limited the impact and further confused this as a claim of accusing Mr. Beiswenger of plagiarism. "Link" is an incredibly obscure book, so it was best to juxtapose this situation against an older, equally (or more so) obscure literary work. This reviewer fully believes that Mr. Beiswenger developed "Link" without engaging in any intellectual theft. The plot details do not copy others, nor are characters, events, or personalities lifted out of other fictional efforts wholesale. Nor has "Assassin's Creed" done the same to "Link". While "Link" and "Assassin's Creed" have high level plot similarities, they are not remotely the same in the content. If this were even a reasonable lawsuit, LucasArts, a far more sophisticated entity than Mr. Beiswenger, would have done so against Naughty Dog and Sony over the Uncharted series (or even the older Tomb Raider series) since LucasArts has an almost identical claim as "Link" does against "Assassin's Creed" in that both "Indiana Jones" and "Uncharted" feature snarky, conventionally attractive archaeologists that engage in treasure hunting against an organized military force that also include elements of the supernatural.

As is common with individuals who cross the thresholds of their main professional focus, Mr. Beiswenger is unfamiliar with the world of literature. I speculate that, in his primary profession, engineering, he is aware of the term "prior art" when engaging in patent work and is casually aware of the patent environment to the point he does not have to engage in too much serious research to determine if a development is based on prior art or is legitimately original (the United States Patent Office sure doesn't as the court system frequently invalidates patents the USPO grants). However, he is, even by his own admission, not an author by trade and wrote this from an idea that popped into his mind one day. Because is was not casually aware of the particularly old themes of genetic memory, machines to access those memories, conspiracy stories involving opposing secret societies, or using science to explain religion, he has confused himself into thinking that he was the legitimate origin for these themes, or even their mixture in "Link".

The general purpose was to, if the short odds lined up, have Mr. Beiswenger find this review and have him realize, "Wait, I really didn't come up with that idea, and I really should drop this lawsuit before I find myself sitting on a huge legal bill with nothing to show for it and possibly an ugly counter-suit from UbiSoft to recoup their legal costs of defending this clearly frivolous suit".

As for the book itself? The plot was creative, but the writing left much to be desired. The book overused "said bookisms" (look it up on TVTropes) and could have benefited greatly from reading Nick Lowe's "The Well-Tempered Plot Device" and James Allen Gardner's "A Seminar on Writing Prose" since the plot itself is poorly developed and the characters are not exactly well developed either. It's more of a two star book - good basis, bad execution.
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32 of 42 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I hope Nintendo doesn't sue this Beiswinger fellow., May 10, 2012
This review is from: Link (Paperback)
It's my sincere hope that Nintendo doesn't sue Beiswinger. The name Link is clearly taken from Nintendo's hit franchise, "The Legend of Zelda". Furthermore there are clearly stolen themes, such as; "fantasy", "fictional", "bipedal", "words", and "a battle between good and evil". This book lacks originality from the front cover to the "about the author" section. It was such a painful read that I now use it for punishment when my children won't go to bed on time. I say, "Get to bed, or else Daddy's gonna' read 'Link' to you." Well, hahahaha, you should see those little scamps race to bed when I say that!! Save your money potential buyers and save your money Mr. Beiswinger, because I'm sure Nintendo is filing the paperwork necessary to take you to court.
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43 of 58 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I actually read the book. WAY over priced., May 9, 2012
This review is from: Link (Paperback)
So i decided to read this book on principal. I wanted to make an informed decision based on both sides of the whole law suit. the fact is, he himself stole a lot of ideas from other people and no credit was given to those individuals in the actual science community. and as some of the others have said the grammer and editing of this book was atrocious. not to mention that the book is almost 10 years old and is still 20 bucks. for a paper back? seriously?
his lawsuit was obviously a play to get sales. and it kinda worked. i did in fact buy the book. so judging the book based on the contents only, this is a horrible, dull book
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50 of 69 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Waste of time, April 20, 2012
This review is from: Link (Paperback)
Boring at best with a clear subtext that can only be described as contemptuous and egotistical. Due to the attention surrounding this book and the author, I read it to see for myself if the negative feedback was accurate... and I'm not convinced it isn't. An average book on its own, with a base idea that IS NOT ORIGINAL (contrary to the lawsuits), the book does manage to stand its own regarding the premise but it stops there.

To everyone rating this just because of the controversy... at least read the thing first and decide for yourself. Don't rate the author, rate the book. That said, I found it equally bad regardless...
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18 of 24 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Boring and monotone book, April 25, 2012
This review is from: Link (Paperback)
Just completed the book and the story was kinda, mehh, boring and monotone style of writing. Would have been better if the story telling was better written. But at this state it wont work.
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30 of 41 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Link? Nintendo should sue you, May 9, 2012
This review is from: Link (Paperback)
This hasnt nothing to do with Ubisofts lawsuit. I read this book. This author is no more than a small business writer. He will never get near the lengths of JK rowling, Stephanie Meyer even, and the like.

The name of the book is link. This story is stolen from the movie Abyss, Dance with Wolves, Last of the mohicans and the like.

This story is not even worth more than 30 seconds of your time.

I think this bares nothing to ubisofts storyline. I am so sorry Your book isnt selling mr. Beiswenger.....

Notice these one star reviews will not get you future books published you are famous for a little while, just like the guy who sued JK ROWLING for Goblet of fire only to have his case dismissed........

the same will happen to you. good day.
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Garbage, May 9, 2012
This review is from: Link (Paperback)
This is the worst piece of trash ever to have words printed onto it. Do not waste your time reading it.
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15 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Awful, May 9, 2012
This review is from: Link (Paperback)
How does someone even come up with something so bad. Seriously recommend a real story. It's called assassins creed. DO NOT BUY THIS EVER...
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15 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Author doesn't have a leg to stand on, April 29, 2012
This review is from: Link (Paperback)
Ok, I Hate rating books unfairly, and I admit that I did not read it. I'm basing this off of the similarities I've read between Assassin's Creed and Link and why I think the author is out of line.

First of all the idea behind Genetic memories were researched back in the 1960s and 1970s. Years before either story came out. Anyone can use that as an idea for a book. Naturally a device will be created to do it, or you can give the character some sort of power to do it. It depends on whether you want to tell a fantasy or sci-fi type of story. Once again, this is not plagiarism.

As for the spiritual and biblical tones...Are you going to sue every story that has this content in it? It's only natural that if you're going to have a character go back through their ancestral line you may want to tackle events of the bible and so forth.

The third similarity is the idea of that ancestor meeting historical figures and being involved in the changing of history. Once again, a natural idea anyone working on the same story theme can come up with. Who wants to write a story about a boring ancestor who sat at home all day or worked on a farm?? Once again, ANYONE can come up with this idea to have their ancestor involved in historical events.

The only way this author can prove plagiarism is if he himself created the characters Altair, Ezio, Desmond, and Connor. The story of these characters have to be extremely similar. Even some of the dialogue has to be the same. The actual written story of Assassin's Creed must be the same as Link. The author can't claim historical events and people as his own! He can't claim biblical references as his own! He also can't claim genetic memory research from the 1970s as his own! Heck even if his book has Assassins in it, he can't claim the idea of assassins and Assassin orders as his own! Not even Ubisoft can do that! Why? Because it is a story premise and you cannot copyright story premises!! He can however, claim his own created characters as his and if he created Altair, Ezio, Desmond, and Connor then he has a good lawsuit, if not...and I HIGHLY doubt he did. He doesn't have a leg to stand on and he is obviously either angry because he wished he did what Ubisoft did with the same story premise or he is following the "any press is good press" idea and is just using this to get out of obscurity.
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62 of 87 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Ugh, unfortunately zero stars were not an option..., April 20, 2012
This review is from: Link (Paperback)
Not only was the story derivative, it was boring. The characters went nowhere. The logical leaps that the book asks you to take are ridiculous at best. I found this at a garage sale and it looked interesting, I was wrong. The thoughts behind the story deserve better execution than is provided in this book. And $18.95 for a paperback? This guy better find a new way to steal money from hard working people.
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Link
Link by Beiswenger John L. (Paperback - January 20, 2003)
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