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228 of 247 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Comparison to Netgear Nighthawk AC1900
Summary: The NETGEAR Nighthawk AC1900 and the Linksys WRT1900AC are pretty much interchangeable, with the BIGGEST difference being a noticeable wider range of wi-fi coverage with the Linksys. Got a small apartment? Get the Nighthawk (assuming it costs less). Got a larger house with lots of walls and rooms? Spend the extra to get this Linksys router. They are both great...
Published 8 months ago by Kilgore Gagarin

versus
283 of 315 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars WRT1900AC Has some serious problems, its not ready for Primetime.
I purchased this router directly from the Linksys store. The router is very attractive, if a bit large. From the day I took it out of the box I began having problems with it locking up when an external drive was attached to the USB 3.0 Port. Over night it would loose the drive. When logging into the interface to try and get it to recognize the drive, the unit would...
Published 8 months ago by Kevin


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228 of 247 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Comparison to Netgear Nighthawk AC1900, June 27, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Summary: The NETGEAR Nighthawk AC1900 and the Linksys WRT1900AC are pretty much interchangeable, with the BIGGEST difference being a noticeable wider range of wi-fi coverage with the Linksys. Got a small apartment? Get the Nighthawk (assuming it costs less). Got a larger house with lots of walls and rooms? Spend the extra to get this Linksys router. They are both great home units.

Trying to add some information you might not get in the standard review, this is a brief comparison with the NETGEAR Nighthawk AC1900 router which costs significantly less. I love both devices, but my experience might help you decide which to get (or others). I'm a dilettante home geek, not a pro, and most of my testing is with media streaming rather than online gaming.

First, the advertised top wi-fi speed of 1300 Mbps using the 5GHz band is pretty much only if you are using an 802.11AC adapter on the client side. I still don't see 802.11AC that widely available, especially if you (like me) tend to buy older PC's and laptops. I've been using an ASUS (USB-AC56) Wireless - AC1200 Dual-Band USB 3.0 Adapter for testing on a couple of laptops and my home brew box, and the speed increase is noticeable and measurable over all other 802 protocols as advertised.

Wireless speed: I don't find any appreciable difference in 5GHz between the Nighthawk or the WRT1900AC, and your actual data throughput WILL vary due to all sorts of environmental issues. Both routers give outstanding performance through the USB 3.0 port. I've got a 3 TB USB 3.0 hard drive that I use for serving movies and music house wide and that setup screams on both units. Hooking up USB 3.0 devices to router USB 3.0 ports isn't touted enough, in my opinion. Again, BOTH units have USB 3.0 ports.

Coverage: This one's all on the side of the Linksys. Using the Android app "Wifi Analyzer" on my phone I could see about a 25% dropoff in signal strength at about 30 feet (Linksys stronger), and when I moved to 50 feet away with several walls, I was still getting a useable connection to the Nighthawk, but the Linksys was barely breaking a sweat. Signal strength difference was over 50% more than the Netgear unit. Again, I'm not doing a lab based analysis, just setting up units and walking around my house. With both units I can go in the back yard or sit in the driveway and still get a useable signal, but the Linksys just kicked the Netgear's behind on this feature.

Footprint: Again, comparable. Both have a much larger footprint than most home routers currently in use. The Netgear unit is the larger of the two, but you'll need more space than you might think for both (Nighthawk is 14 x 10 x 3 inches; Linksys WRT1900AC is 10 x 8 x 2). They both also benefit from having some nice airflow for cooling, but I haven't had any problems with either unit through the early summer.

Hopefully some of this will help you decide what to get. However, if wider wi-fi coverage is what you're looking for, the Linksys is hands down the best I've seen in a home router (so far). If your needs are to cover less space, the Netgear router is as fine a unit. In almost all other features, they're pretty even.

An easy 5 stars if you've got the cash to get one. Both units are on the "Cadillac" side of home routers.

Final note: If you're looking to hack this unit, the "Open Source Ready" claim is technically accurate, but the current state of OpenWRT for this unit is problematic enough I wouldn't recommend that route. The OpenWRT web sites list the status of that software for all sort of units and this one is pretty much alpha or beta-ish (and the wi-fi ascpect isn't functional as of the date of this review).
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283 of 315 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars WRT1900AC Has some serious problems, its not ready for Primetime., June 20, 2014
I purchased this router directly from the Linksys store. The router is very attractive, if a bit large. From the day I took it out of the box I began having problems with it locking up when an external drive was attached to the USB 3.0 Port. Over night it would loose the drive. When logging into the interface to try and get it to recognize the drive, the unit would lock up, and then spontaneously reboot. After about 3 days of this, the router rebooted, reset itself to factory defaults, and from that point onward would spontaneously reboot every 15 to 20 minutes.

Linksys support is divided into three tiers, and they did try and help me quickly. The issue finally made its way to the engineering support team (Tier 3), who told me they have had many of these routers having this rebooting issue, and they are trying to capture the hardware involved, since the ones they have had returned have not been able to duplicate the problem.

So a new 250.00 router that hasn't worked since it came out of the box, 4 days on the phone and in email with Linksys support as this wound its way up the tiers, Multiple reconfigurations, wipes, firmware reloads. A customer service department that has NO idea how to process the exchange for the WRT line, another 250 for advance ship of replacement, Linksys generated UPS return labels with the wrong address printed on them, a ton of frustration and wasted time, and another weekend waiting for the replacement.

This has been a very expensive, and time consuming purchase. I would highly advise anyone looking at this router to wait a few weeks while their engineering team figures out what the issues are with the product. While I often sign on to beta test products, I have never had to pay 500.00 to do it without ever even being asked.

I will update once the replacement arrives.

UPDATE 6-25-2014

Well the replacement was supposed to be here on Monday, but they didn't even ship it till Monday. They were supposed to ship it overnight, instead they shipped it ups to post office to me. Still have not received the replacement.

Update - 6-26-2014

The new router finally arrived today. Got it installed, configured and operating. So far so good, it still is not recognizing my external drive as USB 3.0, but it hasn't failed, lost the drive, or rebooted so far.

The next couple of days will tell the tale.

I still stand by my original position that this router can be as buggy as an ant farm, and depending on your luck, you may get one with no problems, or you may get a boat anchor like the first one I received. Purchasing from Amazon would at least shelter you from the fluster cuck of Linksys replacement process, but really who buys a router expecting to spend two solid weeks trying to get the thing to work.

I will update again in a few days, once I have had a chance to put the new one through its paces, and see if it fails again.

Final Update - 6-28-2014

The replacement router appears to be working as designed. I have given it one additional star, since when it works, its a really nice piece of equipment. Still will not recognize any USB 3.0 Platter drive as USB 3.0, but it is working at USB 2.0 speeds. None of the original rebooting, or loss of Drive problems appear to be present in the replacement router.
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140 of 157 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Handles whatever I throw at it, June 12, 2014
By 
R. French (Jacksonville, FL) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
So far I have to say that I am very impressed after purchasing the WRT19000ac. Spent the last few days looking over the reviews and it seems that nearly all of the negative reviews center around the lack of open source functionality that Linksys claims is still a work in progress.
The directions are very basic and simple and if you follow them you should have no issues. Without trying to be too confusing and detailed, I initially tried to log in and run setup directly by entering the IP address into the browser window but it didn’t seem to like that. The issue was probably more to do with the web browser than the router. After I went back to the directions and used one of my laptops to access the wireless network, installation/setup took about 5 minutes.
So far it has been running great. I have been trying to stress it out but it has taken everything I can throw at it without a hiccup. Right now I am transferring a couple hundred gig of data from an old Iomega NAS that is on its last leg over to a Synology 1513+ using the gigabit LAN ports. According to Windows, transfer speed is averaging 22 MB/second (My old router averaged 1.09 MB/second). At the same time I am surfing the internet & writing this review with a laptop on the 2.4 GHz, my wife is streaming video with an IPad on the 5 GHz and I am streaming MLB.TV in High Definition on my smart TV also on 5GHz. The wrt1900 hasn’t even broken a sweat. It’s a little warm to the touch but still whisper quiet. Using my old router, by now MLB.TV would be looking like standard def, not to mention all the extra buffering, crashes and restarts it would go through.
Although the price is pretty steep, having a total of 14 devices on a wireless router that is capable of managing all of them is worth the extra I had to dole out. Amazon is usually able to beat out any price that I can get locally even when factoring in sales tax but since this item is still new, and since my local electronics store had it the same price, I decided to buy it locally and not have to wait for shipping. Sorry Amazon! If I hadn’t had so much trouble with my old router, I might have waited a bit to see what Amazon does with the price. Overall, my initial impression is “Great Product”
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars They don't make them like they used to., January 5, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Linksys WRT AC1900 Dual-Band+ Wi-Fi Wireless Router with Gigabit & USB 3.0 Ports and eSATA, Smart Wi-Fi Enabled to Control Your Network from Anywhere (WRT1900AC-FFP) (Personal Computers)
I am a Systems and Network Administrator with over 30 years experience in the IT industry. You can imagine how many times I've been asked by friends & relatives, and their friends & relatives for assistance with their home networks. I've worked with more home routers than I can remember, including the very first ones offered by Linksys, and I can unequivocally say that the WRT1900AC is the buggiest, most unstable home router I've ever worked with. Even its most basic functionality is severely broken.

I bought the WRT1900AC to replace my Linksys E1200 running DD-WRT firmware. Despite being low-end and outdated, the E1200 worked fine for everything I needed except that it did not get along with my five Trendnet IP cameras no matter what I tried. They kept dropping off the network every day until I rebooted either the cameras or the router. This never happened with my two previous routers, So when a great deal on the WRT1900AC appeared on Black Friday, I went for it. I'm just glad I ordered it from Amazon, because I'm sending it back.

When I first hooked it up, I was very pleased with the signal strength and connection speed, especially on 5GHz. My Moto X got 175 Mbps in the furthest reaches of the house from the router and 433 Mbps in the same room with it. Then I noticed that absolutely no communication was possible between the 2.4GHz and 5GHz Wi-Fi networks. I couldn't find anything in the router settings pertaining to this odd situation, nor any mention of this behavior in the online manual or on the Linksys support site. I could only view my cameras when I connected my phone to 2.4GHz, which was much slower. Likewise, my Canon MX870 printer on 2.4GHz could not be reached from the 5GHz side. It makes absolutely no sense that the two Wi-Fi networks would be isolated by default, even if there were a menu item to change it, but there wasn't one.

Via Google, no thanks to Linksys, I found a forum that mentioned this very problem and a hidden "Advanced Wireless" configuration menu that can only be accessed by directly entering the URL: 192.168.1.1/ui/1.0.99.164461/dynamic/advanced-wireless.html . Reportedly, unchecking a box to isolate the 2.4GHz network would get communication going both ways between the two Wi-Fi networks, but I found the box already unchecked! So I checked it, and like magic, everything was working like it should have worked out of the box. So they got the sense of the checkbox bass-ackwards. Not a big deal, I'm sure they'll fix it soon, right? After all, I got two firmware updates in the first week that I owned it. All that really mattered was that everything, including my cameras, was now working.

Then I come home one day and I find all my 2.4GHz equipment continuously connecting and backing off. I reboot the router, and everything is fine again. Another day I found the 5GHz signal completely off the air. I had to power cycle the router to get it back. A reboot from the menu didn't fix it. A few days after I got the two Wi-Fi networks communicating, I found them NOT communicating once again. The secret checkbox was still checked, so I uncheck it and it starts working again! Huh?!? So does the meaning of the checkbox change with the day of the week or the phase of the moon or something? After a couple more days, once again the two Wi-Fi networks are not communicating with each other, but this time no power cycling or diddling with the checkboxes would get it working. At this point I've finally had it with the WRT1900AC. It's going back.

Although it's kind of moot to mention other bugs in light of the showstoppers, I noticed that the network map arbitrarily fails to show a random handful of devices at any given time, both wired and wireless, with no apparent rhyme or reason. The same devices will show up later and others will drop off, even though they are all still active. Oh, and the 5GHz network is completely obliterated when a 5.8GHz DSSS cordless phone is in use anywhere in the house. I guess the beamforming feature is no match for Grandma.

You don’t have to have a Linksys’ Smart Wi-Fi account to configure the router, but you do have to use the Smart Wi-Fi app from a mobile device, as it won’t let you log in via the mobile browser. Even though the app lets you log in locally, only presenting the option after a failed Smart Wi-Fi login attempt, it does not give you full access to all of the router’s features, which stinks.

I was also annoyed that on the WAN side the DHCP lease release and renew function is a single button, rather than two separate ones. Maybe you can pull out your WAN connection at just the right moment when you want to switch routers, but I wouldn't count on it. You could end up paying tech support.

This router has been out for about 10 months now, with six firmware releases, and it's still not even fit for market, let alone prime time. The stock firmware features, even if they worked, are woefully low-end for a router with such high-end hardware specs. How about some egress filtering, and maybe an incoming VPN? How about adding DNS-O-Matic to the dynamic DNS update feature? Its alleged support for OpenWRT is a joke even after this long on the market,
mainly due to the use of a radio with no open source driver, despite this being a major selling point for the WRT1900AC. The belkinization of Linksys has destroyed this once top-notch home networking company.

In the mean time, I re-flashed my E1200 with stock Linksys/Cisco firmware and I'm using a Raspberry Pi to provide OpenVPN, file & printer sharing, and dynamic DNS update services. The only thing I can't do with this setup is block the use of alternate DNS services, which was easily done with DD-WRT. Not only do my IP cameras work fine with the stock firmware, my frame rates are much higher than with DD-WRT: 24fps vs. 7 fps.
Hasta la vista, WRT1900AC!
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53 of 63 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Nice, June 12, 2014
By 
I bought this as a replacement for a Netgear R7000 Nighthawk. Just installed and did the manual installation process without creating a linksys account.

Very smooth. UI is responsive and it is doing what I need (reliable internet connection!).

I don't use a lot of features but the signal strength is much better than the Nighthawk. I'll update if anything goes awry in the future.

I had been alternating router manufacturers over the years (Linksys and Netgear) but the disappointment with the Nighthawk will keep me on Linksys in the future.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect, June 10, 2014
It covers an area that I previously could not cover, with great speed, esp @ 5GHz. Runs cool with heavy use. Yep it's Expensive! but it really does the job! Got a better price ordering direct from Lynkys.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Random factory resets! "Known issue", October 22, 2014
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Linksys WRT AC1900 Dual-Band+ Wi-Fi Wireless Router with Gigabit & USB 3.0 Ports and eSATA, Smart Wi-Fi Enabled to Control Your Network from Anywhere (WRT1900AC-FFP) (Personal Computers)
Bought the unit in July. It randomly performs a factory reset within a few days to not more than 2 weeks. Wipes itself clean like it's brand new out of the box and loses all my settings. Running the latest firmware Ver.1.1.8.161917 dated July 8, 2014. Because I have a static IP address from my Internet provider and a custom LAN subnet (i.e. not 192.168.1.x), the factory reset problem causes the Internet connection to be lost until I reconfigure the unit.

After a recent factory reset, it wouldn't load the saved router configuration file and I had to re-enter all my network settings by hand. The unit is connected to a UPS battery backup with the cable modem and PoE switch. Never had a problem with the modem and switch.

I've verified the router configuration is being saved in non-volatile by pulling the power plug and toggling the On/Off switch. That works fine and the router retains it's configuration between power cycles/reboots.

Finally called Linksys Customer Support who confirmed this is a known issue and the suggested workaround is to re-enter the router configuration manually. Since I'd already done that, the rep. is escalating my ticket to Level 2 support who'll call back within 72 hours. Not sure what they can do because all logs and diagnostics are lost when it factory resets itself.

Either way, don't buy until Linksys either recalls the defective v1.0 model hardware or releases a firmware fix if it's a software bug. Unknown what is the root cause at this time pending response from Linksys Level 2 support.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fixed Several Problems, August 13, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I replaced a Linksys E2500 that was a couple years old. The new Linksys WRT1900AC fixed our problems.

1- No more dropped connections. Dropped connections were several times a day.
2- Now we have streaming video without buffering which made movies impossible to enjoy, i.e. DirecTV On Demand, Netflix, Amazon prime
3- Wi-Fi speed increase from 20 to 60 mbps
4- Range within the entire house

Set up was easy, about 15 minutes. I used my previous SSID and password. All devices logged on first try.

This was a great upgrade for my family. We used the internet daily.
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51 of 63 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars $250 For A Router Is Perfectly Acceptable... *IF* It Works... This Doesn't (I've Had Two Of Them... Same Issues), July 9, 2014
By 
This review is from: Linksys WRT AC1900 Dual-Band+ Wi-Fi Wireless Router with Gigabit & USB 3.0 Ports and eSATA, Smart Wi-Fi Enabled to Control Your Network from Anywhere (WRT1900AC-FFP) (Personal Computers)
Based on the stellar reviews of the WRT1900AC, I purchased this router directly from Linksys pretty much because they refused to give me any support on my old, former top of the line router, the Cisco E3000, without paying them for the support and considering that I have 29 wireless devices in my home, I figured that it was time to upgrade and I have a "go big or go home" theory when it comes to my routers. I've gone through two of these, now, and I would advise AGAINST purchasing a WRT1900AC.

After 19 hours on the phone (yes, 19 hours) with Linksys Tech Support including the tech specialists specifically for this model and Linksys sending me a replacement unit, the only conclusion that I could arrive at was that despite the "stellar reviews" by both industry critics and consumers was that this was a hastily released and unreliable product and the comments in the Linksys forums from average consumers and industry professionals tend to agree with this assessment. Apparently there are also issues with random reboots and sudden loss in signal all together... I wouldn't know as the unit couldn't even handle the most basic operations that I needed it to perform in order for me to have it running for any length of time for me to observe this behavior.

My broadband service consistently provides a range of 150 - 190 Mbps DL regardless of the time of day (my plan is for 150 Mbps) hardlined direct from the modem. Hardlining from the router will guarantee a reduction of at least 50% and connecting via WiFi (regardless of band/channel/channel width/MTU, etc.) will guarantee a reduction of at least 75% and that's within 10 feet of the router with no obstructions using an AC rated wireless adapter.

As for use with an Xbox 360 Slim... forget it. The Linksys apologists will blame the built-in N-wireless adapter on the Slims claiming that it causes problems with many routers but I have never had a single issue with my Cisco E3000 or my Netgear wireless routers so you would imagine (and, no, port-forwarding and changing DMZ settings, etc., had no effect) that the top-of-the-line router by Linksys should be able to handle such a common task as connecting to a game console. Worse, I don't even use my 360s' (I have two 360 Slims) wireless capabilities for online gaming. I use them primarily for DLNA streaming from my PC, again a task that's no problem for my other wireless routers but with the WRT1900AC it doesn't even get out of the starting gate because it times-out the connection.

So, why then is it getting all of these rave reviews? I suspect that it has to do with the fact that both consumers and professionals are only testing it and reviewing it using PCs and with a data plan of 50 Mbps or less. I say this because I tested it on the service in my office and had no issues with a loss in signal other than what is the normally acceptable loss (10% - 15%) in signal over WiFi to begin with. So, that being said, it would seem to me that the only people who haven't had issues with the WRT1900AC are the people who didn't need it to begin with or the industry hacks who were testing it under the weakest and most basic conditions possible.

What I've discovered through this process is that the wireless router industry is similar to the gaming console industry in that ultimately the consumer is the final Beta tester and more often than not with routers, these manufacturers release a broken product. But the difference is that the router consumer isn't limited to a new version of their device once every seven years like the gaming console consumer is. A consumer can confidently purchase a current gen or even a last gen wireless router and expect reliable results as all of the bugs have been worked out for the most part already.

So, it's not really an issue of it not being worth paying twice as much for the next gen device, because if it's as advertised, it's well worth it. If the WRT1900AC actually lived up to what it promised I would have been glad to pay Linksys the $250 for it... but it didn't and traditionally they don't on initial release.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great hardware and terrible software, July 7, 2014
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Our family has very high demands for a wireless gateway. We have over 20 wireless devices in the house, as well as a dozen ethernet devices, frequently engage in heavy downloading and streaming, and run several servers. So, a challenging network environment that requires a router capable of heavy lifting. There market for high-end non-business class routers is fairly small, and I was excited to hear about the reborn Linksys, especially with the rather substantial hardware specs this unit offers.

The hardware is as advertised - beefy and powerful - but sadly, it is married to a buggy, limited, built-in firmware that offers very limited functionality, crashes frequently, and sadly fails to take advantage of all the power the fast CPU and expansive memory in the device could offer. During set-up, I found that the router's firmware frequently crashed when doing basic operations such as adding a DHCP reservation for a network device, or when navigating around the (overly fancy but not very useful) network map.

The firmware is also short of the kinds of advanced features I expect to find in a router of this class. There's no support for VPN (either outbound, i.e. connecting your entire network to a VPN server, or inbound, i.e. a built-in OpenVPN server). There is a media prioritization option, but it is very basic and doesn't allow for advanced settings. Other semi-advanced tasks like setting up pinholes and port triggers is very limited and is missing UI basics like a list of attached devices and their IPs to quickly select from (unless you use the super-buggy network map).

I am not sure in what world the product management for this devices decided to spend time on things like that network map, or the worthless built-in speed test, and not on things like VPN support or a more robust UI. Even the Linksys remote management was buggy - and requires the use of a proprietary app - you can't enable remote web-based UI access.

The good news is that all this firmware awfulness can in theory be addressed - it's just software and bugs can be fixed and features added. The base, the solid hardware - is real. Wireless performance is excellent - not magic, but very reliable, and I found the beamforming has a small, but noticeable effect especially vertically. One wireless quirk I found (hopefully just a bug that can be squashed) is that although the device claims to support WPA1 personal, when I tried connecting a Nintendo Wii, which only support WPA1 and not WPA2, it would not connect. A bit of investigation showed that although the gateway says that is supports WPA/WPA2 mode, it wasn't properly allowing WPA only devices onto the 2.4 ghz WLAN.

I will grade this Linksys as "incomplete" - the hardware is ready, and if Linksys can update the firmware, they may have a winner.
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