Lion and the Journalist and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
  • List Price: $25.95
  • Save: $22.06 (85%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Lion and the Journalist: ... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by -TextbookRush-
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: All orders ship SAME or NEXT business day. Expedited shipments will be received in 1-5 business days within the United States. We proudly ship to APO/FPO addresses. 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Lion and the Journalist: The Unlikely Friendship Of Theodore Roosevelt And Joseph Bucklin Bishop Hardcover – November 8, 2011


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$3.89
$3.00 $0.01

The Francis Miracle by John L. Allen
The Francis Miracle by John L. Allen
Check out the newest book by John L. Allen. Learn more
$3.89 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 9 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Lion and the Journalist: The Unlikely Friendship Of Theodore Roosevelt And Joseph Bucklin Bishop + Quentin & Flora: A Roosevelt and a Vanderbilt in Love during the Great War
Price for both: $19.15

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

A New York Times Bestseller

“An ‘unlikely friendship’ has produced an unlikely volume, but one that should be most welcome on anyone’s history shelf. … Read the book with an open mind. It’s a welcome change from dry biography as you ponder the issue of cronyism vs. patriotism.” —Providence Sunday Journal

 
“An entertaining dual biography … Genius … If you’re a T.R. fan, you’ll find much to enjoy in these pages. Bishop has a gift for scene-setting and clear narratives that moves his principals along smartly. … The author’s meticulous research and vivid writing make The Lion and the Journalist a worthy addition to the big-shelf of books on America’s Progressive Era.” —Barnstable Patriot
 
“A revealing look at the relationship between two very different personalities joined by common belief and shared savviness about how the world works. … Bishop has put a real face on the Roosevelt popular caricature, and he has described, through the words of his forebear, the national life that we were living when America was deciding what it would grow up to be.” —Martha’s Vineyard Times
 
"Bishop does an excellent job illustrating the dynamics of the relationship ... and an exceptional job of showing how it strengthened and altered with the passage of time, changes in status, increased physical distance, etc. These are the external forces that shape long-term friendships, but they’re seldom explored so intimately and eloquently in biographies of men. The Lion and the Journalist covers a lot of ground. There’s publishing, politics, PR, and the Panama Canal. It’s an unusual historical mélange, but it’s riveting. It's also an especially rich entry into the genre of biographies about biographers and their subjects. For it was Bishop who penned the first biography of Roosevelt, laying the foundation from which all future biographers would begin."
New Books in Biography


“An engaging tour of the busy intersection where history, politics, journalism, and power converge.” —Kirkus Reviews
 
“Bishop taps the enduring interest about TR and his associates. … Active TR collections will cheer Bishop’s addition to them.” —Booklist

 

“A long time coming but well worth the wait, this book elucidates the relationship between a president and a journalist that had important repercussions for both.”

—Tweed Roosevelt, great-grandson of Theodore Roosevelt and president of the Theodore Roosevelt Association

 

“An invaluable contribution to our understanding of Theodore Roosevelt. By chronicling the fascinating friendship between T. R. and journalist Joseph Bucklin Bishop, Chip Bishop identifies one of the central keys to T. R.'s success: his unparalleled ability to forge warm relationships with the members of the press even when they challenged and criticized him. Both figures are brought to vivid life in this compelling book.”

—Doris Kearns Goodwin, Pulitzer Prize–winning author and presidential historian

 

“Who Roosevelt’s first authorized biographer was and how he became such a close personal friend to the president are aspects of T. R.’s life that have never been chronicled, and it is a blessing that Chip Bishop has stepped up to fill that gap in our knowledge. The fresh material he has unearthed about Joseph Bucklin Bishop’s life and the delightful way he has used it to portray President Roosevelt’s relationship with the American press across his lifetime, in particular with his chosen Boswell, may make many a politician, even presidents, long to recover that past age. Fascinating!”

—Nigel Hamilton, author of American Caesars: Lives of the Presidents from Franklin D. Roosevelt to George W. Bush

 

“Just when we thought there was nothing new to learn about Theodore Roosevelt, comes Chip Bishop’s The Lion and the Journalist, which lifts the curtain on a behind-the-scenes friendship between the iconic president and a prototypical nineteenth century journalist. Here we learn close-up how America’s first media savvy president used the press to his advantage, setting the pattern for all presidents to come. Based on an astounding cache of letters and documents, Bishop’s book will find a deserved place on the Theodore Roosevelt shelf.”
—James McGrath Morris, author of Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print, and Power

 

From the Inside Flap

Theodore Roosevelt, privileged New Yorker and accidental president, and Joseph  Bucklin Bishop, a wily newspaper editor from old New England stock, met when the future Rough Rider was police commissioner of New York City. Bishop hitched his wagon to the politician’s star and used his positions at influential New York newspapers to buttress Roosevelt’s initiatives first as commissioner, then as governor and president, adroitly shaping the opinions of voters and decision-makers. As president, after deploying his trademark gunboat diplomacy to execute plans for the Panama Canal, T. R. made Bishop secretary of the Isthmian Canal Commission in Washington, D.C. But when construction dragged and the canal became a political liability, T. R. dispatched Bishop to Panama, where he used his skills to bolster Congressional support, improve worker morale, and push public opinion in the president’s favor.

Here is a new and important look at one of our nation’s most important leaders and the man who deftly helped him achieve his goals. It skillfully explores how a pioneering president yoked the media to his advantage and how men and machines united two vast oceans in the face of death-defying odds. It is a remarkable story of mutual loyalty and dedication that begins in shared opposition to corruption on the streets of New York City, pushes through ambition and hardship in the jungles of Panama, and culminatesin days of boldness and courage in the White House and beyond.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Lyons Press; F First Edition, 1st Printing edition (November 8, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0762777540
  • ISBN-13: 978-0762777549
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,920,944 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Debra Lape on December 19, 2011
Format: Hardcover
What a wonderful book! Chip Bishop has captured the story behind the story - bringing both his ancestor Joseph Bucklin Bishop and his famous friend Theodore Roosevelt to life.

I was fascinated by Joseph's ability to accumulate the full chronology of Theodore's letters, made possible by Joseph's research into the timeline of his friend's life. It is enchanting that Joseph's ancestor Chip would walk many of those same steps in pursuit of not only Theodore's story, but that of his own famous family journalist.

The Lion and the Journalist is a great time-travel story into our American past.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By gene kopelson on January 19, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I actually prefer the original title of this book, as TR and Bishop had a multi-decade long friendship the details of which I certainly never knew before reading this masterpiece. Chip's prose flows as a good story-teller's should
and follows both Bishop's career and TR's exploits in many places over many many years. I also enjoyed their relationships with Jacob Reis and John Hay explored in depth as each related to both Bishop and TR. At one point Hay's lending of $20 to Bishop was very touching. It is too bad there is scant information of how Gifford Pinchot interacted with Bishop, as they saw each other at many TR dinners and meetings. Chip's detailed review of the Congressional hearings related to Bishop's Panama Canal Commission salary illuminates the politics of that era and our own time. Chip also uncovered new historical information as evidenced by the illustrated documents which complement the text.
As a non-historian casual reader but fan of TR, I highly recommend Chip Bishop's book to readers interested in the life and times of TR, life and politics in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and to fans of John Hay.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By M. Howells on February 10, 2012
Format: Hardcover
A well written piece by the subject J.B. Bishop's great grand-nephew. Offers insight into the turn-of-the-century print publishing, TR's understanding of the PR game, and the massive effort that was the building of the Panama Canal. References likely sources such as McCullough's The Path Between the Seas: The Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870-1914 and Edmund Morris's Theodore Roosevelt Trilogy Bundle: The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt, Theodore Rex, and Colonel Roosevelt, but also includes some enlightening personal correspondence between the two men. A worthy addition to a TR collection.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Timothy Chambers on October 26, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I first encountered this work on Authonomy.com a couple of years ago, when it was still in an earlier draft. I was immediately captivated by Bishop's portrayal of Roosevelt through the eyes of his household staff. He comes across as the true prince from the fables of Anderson and Grimm. Roosevelt and his good friend, Joseph Bucklin Bishop, formed a partnership as agents of change and heralds of the Progressive Era. Roosevelt was the man of action, Bishop, his muse and publicist, a writer on the editorial staff of the legendary publisher, Horace Greeley. Bishop knows his subject better than anyone alive, having been raised on stories of his family 's accomplished ancestor and his relationship with Roosevelt. Written from a trove of 600 letters exchanged between the two men over the course their respective careers, the book provides a remarkable lesson in the exercise of power through the press, and provides new insight into the mind of one of our greatest Presidents. Such leadership is sorely lacking today among the lickspittles to Plutocrats who, for years now, have sullied the offices of all our capitol cities, but particularly in Washington. The book comes out at a fortuitous moment, when Progressivism is emerging from the grave, in the form of the Occupy movement. Would that the movement bring forth its own Lion and Journalist, to accomplish the sorts of things these men did through their life-long political partnership.

What I found most enjoyable about this book is the fine balance it strikes between scholarship and story-telling. It adheres to the flow of the story, without ever being weighed down with extraneous facts and details, as often happens with scholarly tomes written for specialist audiences.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Frank Stevens Hawks on December 15, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Chip Bishop through extensive research, hard work, and intriguing writing has come up with a great story of friendship, world events, and political maneuvers that will entertain you from beginning to end. I have read many books on TR and especially the Panama Canal. This book not only taught me more about TR but showed me the inside story of how he cultivated a friendship to influence the world. GREAT Story!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Keith F. Simon on November 17, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This book is an excellent study of both a developing life-long relationship of mutual trust as well as how Theodore Roosevelt came to understand the power of the press and how he could use his friendships with powerful men in the media of his day to advance both his personal causes as well as his own career. If the reader wonders if just how close to TR, Bishop was, consider this. In the twilight of his life, as TR struggled with accumulation of injuries and diseases that would lead to his death in early 1919, he turned to but one man to tell the story of his life and leave TR's own interpretation of himself for future generations. That man was Joseph Bucklin Bishop. Theodore Roosevelt authorized Bishop alone, to convey to future generations the entirety of his life, his purpose and indeed the grand heart and indomitable spirit of this lion of a man. That very fact sets Bishop in a unique category. Unlike Thomas Jefferson, who literally spent decades destroying personal letters that put him in an unfavorable light and attempting to spin his own image for posterity, TR simply did not have the desire nor need for such manipulation. In very few areas did he try to reinterpret himself. These areas would become subjects for debate by critics such as Henry Pringle who made a cottage industry of criticizing a deceased TR who could not defend himself. So getting the TR story right was uppermost with Roosevelt in the last years of his life. The fact that he would entrust this to Bishop, for me, says it all. And Bishop would help realize TR's Panama Canal dream by becoming TR's point man in Panama and later becoming a Panama mainstay and governing the progress of the entire project after TR's death for several years. A great read and a real inside look on the friendship of two Americans at the dawn of the American Century.

Keith Simon
Trustee, Theodore Roosevelt Association
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Lion and the Journalist: The Unlikely Friendship Of Theodore Roosevelt And Joseph Bucklin Bishop
This item: Lion and the Journalist: The Unlikely Friendship Of Theodore Roosevelt And Joseph Bucklin Bishop
Price: $3.89
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?