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126 of 129 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not Just for Backpacking, Truly Lipsmacking Recipes!
We have 8 backpacking cookbooks including both of Christine's books. Lipsmackin' Backpackin' is by far our most used book in our kitchen. The recipes are easy to follow, use easy to obtain foodstuffs, are tasty, quick to prepare, and are even great out car camping where storage space is still at a premium in our little VW campmobile or for a quick busy nite at home...
Published on January 21, 2005 by D. R. Whitham

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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not that useful and perhaps not that lightweight
I am in charge of packing the food for my sister and I each Spring and Fall for ten days in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. I started drying our own food after the first trip (up to 15 now).

I bought this book because, face it, after awhile you want something/anything different to eat. But my major concerns are weight, nutrition, and taste. I found...
Published on June 14, 2010 by Virginia A. Spiegel


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126 of 129 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not Just for Backpacking, Truly Lipsmacking Recipes!, January 21, 2005
This review is from: Lipsmackin' Backpackin': Lightweight Trail-tested Recipes for Backcountry Trips (Paperback)
We have 8 backpacking cookbooks including both of Christine's books. Lipsmackin' Backpackin' is by far our most used book in our kitchen. The recipes are easy to follow, use easy to obtain foodstuffs, are tasty, quick to prepare, and are even great out car camping where storage space is still at a premium in our little VW campmobile or for a quick busy nite at home dinner.

We bought this book in 2000 just before a 50 mile rim to rim extended hike in the Grand Canyon. Most of our older books dating back to the early 70's called out items that were hard to find early on and next to nonexistent now days. Freeze dried meals may be light but are expensive to use for the number of nites we spend out on the trail every year. Not to add 1 meal isn't enough and 1 for each of us is way too much, meaning that we have always had to repack 3 freeze dried meals into 2 meals or add extra ingredients to bulk them out. Rice mixes and couscous get old.

The recipes in Lipsmackin' Backpackin' were so yummy sounding that we packed a weeks worth of them into the Grand Canyon, without even trying them at home first. Every one of the recipes we tried has been a keeper. Except for a few recipes of our own that we have come up with over the years, or a few favorites, we have hardly used our other books since. It is our gift of choice for Christmas, wedding and birthday presents.

We are the backpacking coordinators for a local hiking club and the first thing we recommend to beginners trying to think of something to eat when backpacking, is to buy this book.

Note that while Christine makes good use of a dehydrator, we have found that preparedness stores carry a wide variety of dehydrated or freeze dried vegies, fruit, or meats to buy in bulk (even peanut butter powder and the ever elusive sour cream powder) so it is possible to produce many of the meals with a well stocked backpack foods pantry. On the other hand, we didn't buy our two dehydrators just to make apple rings with. With a little planning and a spring weekend of assembly line packing each year, we have a whole seasons worth of meals packed and ready to go down in our basement. Then all we have to do is make our minds up on which meals to take when we pack our packs. Cooking our meals usually does not take any longer than it takes our friends to cook what ever red or white glop they are making. Plus we can control portions so much easier and rarely have leftovers to pack out.
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63 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From bland to BAM! (to borrow from Emeril), November 30, 2000
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This review is from: Lipsmackin' Backpackin': Lightweight Trail-tested Recipes for Backcountry Trips (Paperback)
If you love the outdoors but tire of a monotonous diet of granola ,ramen and peanut butter, you will be delighted with this book. I have other books but this one is the best. The Connors supply simple recipes with precise explanations on exactly how to use a dehydrator, how to reconstitute and divide the servings. I chanced (without taste testing first) the chicken curry salad and the creamy cilantro tuna salad on a 5 day backpack trip. Wow, were my friends impressed. I look forward to trying other recipes and further enhancing my reputation as a gourmet backcountry cook. Thank you,Tim and Christine!
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88 of 97 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Make sure you have a dehydrator, July 30, 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Lipsmackin' Backpackin': Lightweight Trail-tested Recipes for Backcountry Trips (Paperback)
A worthy book; however, a careful reading reveals that many of its recipes require the cook to "dry [various ingredients] in your dehydrator." This should not be a surprise to anyone who hits the trail often, but don't spend money on this book unless you have a dehydrator and are reasonably adept at operating it.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb collection of serious backpacking recipes., September 5, 2007
This review is from: Lipsmackin' Backpackin': Lightweight Trail-tested Recipes for Backcountry Trips (Paperback)
`Lipsmackin' Backpackin, Lightweight Trail-Tested Recipes for Backcountry Trips' by Tim and Christine Conners is but the second book I've seen on the subject since I started reviewing cookbooks. The first is almost 35 years old, being `Backpacker's Cookbook' by Margaret Cross and Jean Fiske.
On first blush, the newer book seems better in almost every way, in that it includes the total weight of every recipe, all recipes specify the number of servings, and almost all are for one or two servings, just right for the average camping experience. The Conners' book also includes a nutritional analysis by serving for each recipe. Best of all, for those true disciples of Colin Fletcher's `The Complete Walker', the book includes miniature summaries of each recipe on their own little slip of paper, each weighing no more than the borders of the maps you cut off, per Master Fletcher, to reduce your packing weight.
The book is also very advanced, and allied to some extent with the `raw' food movement, in that it makes extensive use of a food dehydrator as a means of reducing the packable weight of each recipe. My favorite aspect of this book is that it also includes several recipes for bread, including two based on the truly amazing technique of wrapping the dough around a stick and suspending the dough over the campfire by jamming the stick into the ground at the side of the fire. This technique is at least as old as the Boy Scout Handbook of 50 years ago, and I was never brave enough to try it then, but I'm happy to see it's still around.
But, the venerable old `Backpacker's Cookbook' is not ready to be put out to pasture yet. The two books really represent two different models of camping. The older book seems to be written primarily for the weekend hiker or someone who at most may go for a four to five day hike. There is less emphasis on weight and advance preparation and packing. Virtually everything is straight off the supermarket shelves, with a little repackaging of premeasured ingredients. And, there is no systematic division of advance preparation steps with `on the trail' work. The Conners' book is clearly written for those who are intent on multi-week treks on the Appalachian Trail, the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail, or any other major hiking venue.
Another big difference is that while I believe Cross and Fiske have food writing or food business vocations, the Conners are amateurs in the world of food writing. And, virtually all their recipes are collected from contributions by friends, colleagues, and correspondents.
The last difference of note is that the Conners' book gives no attention whatsoever to backpacking cooking equipment, while Cross and Fiske treat the subject in detail, and give extensive references to other books on the subject, although except for Fletcher's classic, I would not guarantee that many are still in print, but you may be surprised.
So, while the Conners have done an excellent job, they left some things undone, for which I offer Cross and Fiske as an excellent supplement.
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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A little bit for everyone..., May 3, 2000
This review is from: Lipsmackin' Backpackin': Lightweight Trail-tested Recipes for Backcountry Trips (Paperback)
This well thought out and researched ("hey friend what'ja eatin over there") book is a must for anyone who likes to eat while backpacking. The diverse recipes are easy to follow and offer ideas that anyone can use, independent of their personal eating habits. From the simple and quick off-the -supermarket-shelf meals to the involved I-like-to-cook meals, this book offers them all. And if your interested in your nutrition, there is a nutritional breakdown for every recipe - a great addition. I can't wait to go backpacking again so I can start eating well.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lipsmackin' Backpackin' - a compendium of excellent recipes, June 11, 2004
This review is from: Lipsmackin' Backpackin': Lightweight Trail-tested Recipes for Backcountry Trips (Paperback)
Tim and Christine spent many hours researching this book which was published in 2000. Drawing on their own experiences and that of acquaintances, Tim and Christine have provided us with yummy recipes that reflect many cultures and tastes.

Most of the recipes require at home preparation. Many call for dehydrating or drying the food and then re-hydrating it on the trail. The book has a nutritional breakdown for each recipe and packable cooking directions to take with you on the trail. There are even instructions on how to grow your own fresh sprouts in your backpack.

I've tried several of the recipes with great success. You will find everything from almonds to zucchini in this resource. You'll also enjoy reading the anecdotes and appreciate the way the recipe instructions are divided into two parts; at home and on the trail. There are recipes for both vegetarians and meat eaters. I found that I could easily modify the meat recipes to suit a vegetarian menu by increasing the amount of veggies and omitting the meat.

Lipsmackin' Backpackin' is a veritable compendium of excellent recipes with the backpacker in mind. This well written recipe book contains over two hundred pages of mouth watering recipes to enhance your outdoor experience.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not that useful and perhaps not that lightweight, June 14, 2010
This review is from: Lipsmackin' Backpackin': Lightweight Trail-tested Recipes for Backcountry Trips (Paperback)
I am in charge of packing the food for my sister and I each Spring and Fall for ten days in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. I started drying our own food after the first trip (up to 15 now).

I bought this book because, face it, after awhile you want something/anything different to eat. But my major concerns are weight, nutrition, and taste. I found many recipes contained WAY too much sodium and some just seemed ridiculous. I think we could all figure out that we could buy black bean mix and slap it on a tortilla or put a piece of cheese on a Triscuit. Maybe less time could have been spent on cute names and more time on food that didn't involve purchased mixes and ramen noodles.

There are much better books out there, so shop around.
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46 of 56 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Don't buy for dinner recipes unless you have a dehydrator, July 20, 2007
This review is from: Lipsmackin' Backpackin': Lightweight Trail-tested Recipes for Backcountry Trips (Paperback)
I agree with the person who wrote that you need a dehydrator for this book's recipes. The author commented (rather self-defensively) that a full 2/3 of the recipes do not require one, but that's not true for the dinners.

I'll be honest and say that dinners are why I bought this - snacks and breakfast aren't that hard to make, but dinners, especially for a group, can be challenging. I did a quick count, and 40 of the 59 dinners require a dehydrator. Of the ones that don't, the authors include recipes with ramen, spam, and macaroni and cheese, none of which I need a cookbook for and two of which I bought the book to get away from.

And then there's the "Trail-grown sprouts" dinner which suggests growing sprouts for three days in netting, presumably in your pack, and then eating. This is hardly a full meal. There are also a few dinner recipes with the main ingredient being plants or fish caught while in the backcountry, such as "Sandy's Weed Salad" with "Collect greens along the way in a plastic sack and wash them in streams" and then toss with dressing as the directions. Most experienced hikers know to not plan on a meal being caught or harvested in the wild.

The book is also padded with information about National and Historic Scenic Trails in the United States, which is ok information I guess, but a) is of very little use to most people unless they plan on traveling the entire country, and b) odd to have in a cook book.

I will probably sell this book and look for another that doesn't have so many major meals (e.g. dinners) that require a dehydrator.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Food Bible for the Long Distance Hiker, March 17, 2000
This review is from: Lipsmackin' Backpackin': Lightweight Trail-tested Recipes for Backcountry Trips (Paperback)
Finally someone got it right! These are real recipes by back country hikers. This great book contains a wealth of practical, how-to info for preparing delicious, high energy trail food. Get this book and you won't be eating the same dry cereal for weeks at a time!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book!, July 31, 2001
By 
Rudy (Portland, Oregon United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Lipsmackin' Backpackin': Lightweight Trail-tested Recipes for Backcountry Trips (Paperback)
I have been using this book for several months and haven't met a recipe that I didn't like. Sometimes I'll bring a meal to work to have co-workers try it out. Most of the time I have people asking to try some and they don't even know it's been dehydrated and brought back to life!
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