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Listed: Dispatches from America's Endangered Species Act Hardcover


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Listed: Dispatches from America's Endangered Species Act + The Endangered Species Act (Stanford Environmental Law Society Handbook)
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press (May 31, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0674047516
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674047518
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.8 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #295,438 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

A beautifully written description of what is happening to many of our only known living companions in the universe, told against the background of the much (ignorantly) maligned U.S. Endangered Species Act. It is also a plea to take steps that would help to preserve threatened organisms and us. A fascinating read. (Paul R. Ehrlich, coauthor of The Dominant Animal)

[Roman] provides a memorable dispatch on the fate of endangered species. (Kirkus Reviews 2011-03-15)

In Listed, conservation biologist Joe Roman recounts the uses and abuses of a well-intentioned but all-too-human law...Roman's meandering and occasionally lyrical book is generally optimistic about the law he is chronicling, and he tends toward win-win tales. (Katherine Mangu-Ward Wall Street Journal 2011-05-05)

The Endangered Species Act has been under attack since it was passed in 1973, when the tiny snail darter temporarily stopped the building of the Tellico Dam. The history of the act, and all of the ramifications of listing (or not listing) a species as endangered under the act, is thoroughly investigated in this wide-ranging examination of one of the most important pieces of federal legislation of the twentieth century. Roman chose a few cases to illustrate why people feel threatened by the act--it puts people out of work and it puts animals before people--and why biodiversity protection really works. Roman joined scientists as they studied such high-profile species as the Florida panther, red-cockaded woodpecker, and whooping crane, as well as researchers who look at Lyme disease, ethnobotanists studying medicinal plants, malacologists trying to save freshwater mussels, and a volunteer working on the gopher frog. As he describes the field research, Roman demonstrates why saving endangered species and protecting biodiversity makes sense economically, medicinally, and philosophically. A perfect primer on the Endangered Species Act. (Nancy Bent Booklist 2011-05-01)

Roman offers revealing case studies on the effects of the Endangered Species Act, which has been under attack almost since becoming law in 1973. Complaints have focused on the burdens placed on governments and citizens. Roman counters by making the case that protecting species can benefit both the environment and business. (Christopher Schoppa Washington Post 2011-04-29)

Read[s] like dispatches from a war reporter in the midst of battle...Listed takes an idiosyncratic approach to the [Endangered Species Act], using it as an entry to many issues and controversies in conservation. Roman is an engaging author, and readers will enjoy the book. They will also come away having gained a deeper understanding of the Act, along with a plethora of interesting facts about listed species. (Daniel Simberloff American Scientist 2011-07-01)

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) was a revolutionary step toward the protection of threatened biodiversity, but it has not been an unqualified success. In Listed, Roman examines the history, accomplishments, and failures of the law with a series of essays, each of which focuses on one of the animals the act affects...The book is informative and enjoyable. (J. L. Hunt Choice 2011-09-01)

About the Author

Joe Roman is a researcher at the University of Vermont, the author of Whale, and senior editor of the journal Solutions.

More About the Author

Joe Roman, a writer and conservation biologist, was born and raised in New York. (He counts King Kong as an early conservation influence.) His most recent book is "Listed: Dispatches from America's Endangered Species Act," winner of the 2012 Rachel Carson Environment Book Award. He does research and teaches at the University of Vermont. His studies have appeared in "Science," "Proceedings of the National Academy of Science," "Trends in Ecology and Evolution," and other journals. More information can be found at www.joeroman.com.

Customer Reviews

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See all 8 customer reviews
The writing is often poignant, and there were stories that both made we wince and made me feel hopeful.
NCstat
Conservation biologist Joe Roman revisits many of the biggest battles in the endangered species act over the decades in this highly interesting and readable book.
LINA
I highly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in the topic and enjoys a well written book and an enjoyable read.
Paul Lattanzio

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Marilla MacGregor on December 12, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Biodiversity is important! Why? Listed: Dispatches from America's Endangered Species Act by Joe Roman, gives many answers to this question. Listed is a 2011 book of great import, and one which any person who cares about life on planet Earth should read. In his prologue, Roman clearly states the purpose of his work: to see if biodiversity protection is working, and how humans are being affected by it (Roman 4). Examining these questions through beautiful and moving stories of endangered species and the people who live near them, Roman shows the conflict between species protection and human economics, and presents information on how humans and nature can work together for the benefit of all.
The Endangered Species Act of 1973 was made to protect listed species from becoming extinct. However, there has always been a lot of conflict between conservation of species and human economics. Roman focuses on two main issues: how species are protected and what more needs to be done in that realm, and the conflict between conservation and economics, suggesting that conservation can bring huge benefits to the human population.
Using stories like that of the red-cockaded woodpecker, Roman supports the idea that nature is the basis for the economy. Throughout the book, Roman makes a point of showing what economic benefits nature brings to human life. However, in order for humans to gain these benefits, biodiversity needs to be protected. These benefits come from the intricate workings of various precisely balanced ecosystems. Roman points out that diversity in genetics, species, and natural communities can stabilize an ecosystem (Roman 83).
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By S. J. Snyder on August 28, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Kudos to Joe Roman for writing not just about "charismatic megafauna," other than chapters on the Florida panther, wolves in Yellowstone and the (very likely extinct for decades) ivory-billed woodpecker.

Other than that, it's about mussels, frogs, salamanders, and things that don't even get considered for the ESA, like extremeophilic bacteria. This is a great, great book of essays.

And, it's about more than species, it's about ecosystems. As any good environmentalist knows, species can't be protected very well without maintenance of adequate habitats. Roman weaves the two sides of the story together in discussing Lyme disease and its possible vector(s), what animals are involved in that vector and more.

For nature lovers at times frustrated by government foot dragging on species listing and other things, this book can be a shot in the arm.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Paul Lattanzio on November 13, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Most of the books I read are either interesting or informative but Listed was most definitely both. I bought the book because I was interested in understanding the impact of America's Endangered Species Act. I certainly learned everything I had sought but I was thoroughly entertained along the way. Roman mixes his personal stories (often humorous) into the history and makes you feel a part of his journey. I was surprised by how much evidence there is to support Roman's basic assertion---that conservation has significant economic benefits (not just significant costs) and that one can argue that conservation is economically justified in addition to being the obvious right thing to do for our future generations.. I highly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in the topic and enjoys a well written book and an enjoyable read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By LINA on August 9, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Conservation biologist Joe Roman revisits many of the biggest battles in the endangered species act over the decades in this highly interesting and readable book. The author intersperses deep knowledge about the issues with lyrical descriptions of the people he meets and places he visits along the way.

I picked this up after reading the Wall Street Journal review of it. I was shocked by the number of species we've lost or are on the verge of losing, and what that means not only for animals but also for us. Our existence is deeply intertwined with the fate of the species we often view only as a road block for the next damn/highway/subdivision all in the name of "growth".

Roman argues convincingly that saving species is not just an ethical issue, but a critical one for our own survival. And he outlines for us a path to a sustainable future that balances the needs for jobs with respect for the world we live in. Beautiful work- I highly recommend.
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