Little Green: An Easy Rawlins Mystery and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $25.95
  • Save: $8.17 (31%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 17? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Little Green: An Easy Rawlins Mystery Hardcover


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$17.78
$11.43 $5.90 $15.95

Frequently Bought Together

Little Green: An Easy Rawlins Mystery + Blonde Faith: An Easy Rawlins Novel + Six Easy Pieces: Easy Rawlins Stories
Price for all three: $39.72

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Series: Easy Rawlins
  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday; First Edition edition (May 14, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385535988
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385535984
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.2 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (303 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #45,416 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Since sending his series hero Easy Rawlins off a cliff in Blonde Faith (2007), Mosley has dallied with other series and genres, with varying degrees of success. Through it all, though, most Mosley fans were pining for the resurrection of Rawlins. Their dreams have come true. It turns out that Easy’s misguided suicide went awry, thanks to the intervention of Mouse, Easy’s best friend and the most dangerous man in L.A. As this novel begins, it’s 1967, and Easy has just awakened from a coma to find Mouse at his bedside with a plan to get his pal back in the PI game. A beaker or two of God-knows-what from voodoo master Mama Jo’s home brew, and Easy is following a missing boy’s trail to the Sunset Strip, now the home turf of flower children, whom the shell-shocked detective finds an oddly supportive lot: “I’d driven my Pontiac off a cliff and landed in a new world.” Mosley returns here to doing what he does best: setting the pain and pleasure of individual lives, lived mostly in L.A.’s black community, within an instantly recognizable historical moment and allowing the two to feed off one another. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: The return of Easy Rawlins is a major event for crime-fiction fans, and Mosley’s publisher will be making sure the news is spread widely. --Bill Ott

Review

Advance Praise for LITTLE GREEN:

“In 2007’s Blonde Faith, set in 1967, Easy Rawlins drove drunkenly off a cliff in what his creator indicated was likely his last appearance. Now, after two months of sliding in and out of consciousness, Easy begins the long journey back to the living, in Mosley’s superb 12th mystery featuring his iconic sleuth…. If there were an Edgar for best comeback player, Easy Rawlins would be a shoo-in.”
Publishers Weekly (starred) 


"Mosley fans were pining for the resurrection of Rawlins.  Their dreams have come true.... Mosley returns here to doing what he does best: setting the pain and pleasure of individual lives, lived mostly in L.A.'s black community, within an instantly recognizable historical moment and allowing the two to feed off one another.... [A] major event for crime-fiction fans." 
—Bill Ott, Booklist


More About the Author

Walter Mosley is one of America's most celebrated and beloved writers. His books have won numerous awards and have been translated into more than twenty languages.

Mosley is the author of the acclaimed Easy Rawlins series of mysteries, including national bestsellers Cinnamon Kiss, Little Scarlet, and Bad Boy Brawly Brown; the Fearless Jones series, including Fearless Jones, Fear Itself, and Fear of the Dark; the novels Blue Light and RL's Dream; and two collections of stories featuring Socrates Fortlow, Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned, for which he received the Anisfield-Wolf Award, and Walkin' the Dog. He lives in New York City.

Customer Reviews

The characters in the story are most interesting.
Barbara L. Holt
Walter Mosley is an insightful philosopher who wraps his message with compelling stories and fascinating characters.
CarefulConsumer
I love Walter Mosley, I love Easy Rawlin's and who cannot have some love for Mouse?
Jacque Cartwright

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 40 people found the following review helpful By George R. Johnson VINE VOICE on March 25, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I've been a fan of Walter Mosley's writing since I discovered the first Easy Rawlins novel. With LITTLE GREEN, he's brought back Easy after a six year absence and death.

His friend Mouse finds him on a cliff edge after his car had plunged over into the water and people had believed his body had floated away. Old Mama Jo had told Mouse Easy wasn't dead and the little man had found his friend.

After a month of near coma, he comes back and finds Mouse sitting beside him. Knowing Mouse, Easy asks what he needs. A young man had gone missing a few days before and needed to be found.

Easy gets up off his sick bed, with the aid of Mama Jo's-voodoo medicine-and begins looking.

The trail leads him into the hippie culture of L.A., a group Easy feels a strange kinship for. People looked down on by the straight establishment for the way they look, dress, believe.

It also leads him into confrontations with hoodlum types also looking for the young man.

What I like about Mosley's writing is it gives me a glimpse into a world different from my own, a world I wish to know better, a world where people weren't judged by their accomplishments or honesty, but the color of their skin.

And a damned good tale along the way.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By H. F. Corbin TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 28, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Easy Rawlins is back almost literally from the dead with a vengence in Walter Mosley's latest mystery LITTLE GREEN. All the usual suspects, of course, make an appearance: Feather, Juice, Bonnie, Mouse et al. The place is Los Angeles of course; and the time is 1967 when there were still phone booths, a local call was only ten cents, secretaries typed on IBM Selectric typewriters and hippies dropped acid and listened to Jefferson Airplane and the Rolling Stones. Everything we have come to expect from Mr. Mosley is here. Easy starts out with the simple task of finding a missing person as a favor for a friend. Certainly nothing is ever quite that simple in this PI's life as the dead bodies pile up as he moves from one danger to another. He along the way makes the obligatory observations about family, love, ethics and particularly race in America as he is always philosophical. "Black people in America at that time and, and all the way back to our first conveyance, the slave ship, had received common traits. . . But our true inheritance was the fear of being noticed, and worry about everything from rain collapsing the walls around us to a casual glance that might lead to lynching. We--almost every black man, woman, and child in America--inherited anxieties like others received red hair and blue eyes." And he opines that knowledge is the deepest kind of trust.

What makes Easy so endearing is that he can work his way around racist cops and murderers of all colors and still believe that "It's an amazing world out there if you give it half a chance." And you have to love a character who calls himself an "uneducated reader, a man who loved books beyond any other thing outside of family and close friends," who reads Andre Malraux, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston and T. S. Eliot.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Gregory McMahan VINE VOICE on April 16, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
In Walter Mosley's latest book, Little Green, we find his signature character, Easy Rawlins, summoned back to detection duty from what would seemingly be a near-death experience that leaves our hero weary both in body and in soul. The caper, set in the mid-1960s, features lots of detail on Flower-Power Los Angeles, from the folks in the streets, the cars on the road to the music being played while cruising the then very drive-able boulevards of night-time Los Angeles.

The basic plot begins with a seemingly benign request from Easy's long-time friend, side-kick and deadly alter-ego, Mouse while Easy is languidly recuperating from his brush with death. A mother is looking for her son, who apparently was so taken with the hippie-scene on the Sunset Strip that he quite literally 'turned-on, tuned-in, and dropped (out) off' of the face of the Earth, as acolytes of the LSD uber-pusher Timothy Leary were fond of saying. Easy, who normally wouldn't put a missing person's case like this ahead of his own suffering, readily agrees to help out Mouse, though Easy has lingering questions about Mouse's true motivations. These questions gradually morph into gnawing reservations hiding in the back of his mind after he meets the missing lad's mother, who in turn has no great love for Mouse.

The tale basically rings true from the standpoint of setting, and the characterizations are top-notch as always. I especially liked Easy's worldly wise commentary, especially the following passage on page 80:

"Money means freedom; that was what people in the white America thought then. Citizens like me knew that whatever you had could be taken away in an instant. We knew that value was first and foremost defined by the hand that offered it.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Richard B. Schwartz TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 10, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
In Little Green Easy Rawlins has lost (at least temporarily) the woman he loves and driven off the PCH into the rocks and sea. Comatose, he slowly returns to the world of the living as his friend Raymond Alexander asks him to take on a case.

A young man named Evander Noon has disappeared. Raymond has been involved with the man's mother in an as yet unspecified capacity; he calls him `Little Green' for (again) as yet unspecified reasons.

Easy is fortified by a voodoo concoction and is able to pursue the investigation. Evander has attempted to demonstrate his manhood by defying his mother's wishes and joined the hippies on the strip for a night of freedom and release. He is quickly dosed with LSD by a young woman who sells flowers which she has stolen from Beverly Hills gardens. The night is a blur, but it appears that Evander has been drawn into a desperate criminal action and is hunted down for a large cache of cash which has come into his possession.

Easy has multiple tasks: to regain his own physical and mental health, to find Evander and protect him from an assorted group of drug dealers and gangsters, to help Evander's mother, to keep Raymond from killing everyone in southern California and, as always, to navigate his way through a largely white world which is slowly changing, sometimes in positive ways.

In this late 60's world, Easy is now in his late 40's. He is a fully-licensed private investigator, with his own office. He also owns multiple units of rental property, is a heroic survivor of World War II (including the Battle of the Bulge) and a man who seems to know every lever of power and every individual in both the lights and the shadows of Los Angeles.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa5f75954)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?