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Little Lord Fauntleroy (Puffin Classics) Paperback – January 1, 1996


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 4 - 7
  • Series: Puffin Classics
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin (January 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140367535
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140367539
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 5 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (44 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #542,546 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 4-7–Transformation and redemption of a curmudgeonly Earl comes through the innocence of a poor boy living in New York City during the late 1800's. Devoted to his American mother, who has never been recognized by her aristocratic British father-in-law, Cedric Fauntleroy is summoned to England to assume the mantle of future Lord of the manor. Beguiling all he meets with his selflessness and goodness, he becomes the vehicle for reconciliation between his mother and grandfather, while rekindling the true meaning of "noblesse oblige" in his lineage. Opening with a brief biography of Frances Hodgson Burnett gives a sense of history to this moralistic Victorian tale. Donada Peters offers an admirable narration of this lengthy production. Her diction is clear and crisp, and the reading is well-paced and sensitive to the characters' inflections, bringing mood and meaning through this technique. She portrays Mr. Hobbs, the grocer, using gruff, yet personable tones, and Mary, the Irish servant, with a musical, lilting brogue. Her strength lies with the traditional voices that have more story line dimensions, such as the Earl, Mr. Haversham, and Dick. The voices for "dearest" and Cedric, the main characters, are not as striking. She fails to give a solid American accent throughout, and oftentimes Cedric's voice becomes too saccharine in order to portray his innate "goodness." During some transitions, the voices of narrator and characters blend into one. At intervals, there are split second pauses, quite often at the end of sentences during the narration. This might reflect splicing or editing and are a constant distraction The use of music or sound effects to add vitality to this antiquated tale would have enhanced it for those who are not familiar with classic British stories. Fans of Burnett and those who like a rich vocabulary would be the most receptive audience.–Tina Hudak, St. Bernadette School, Silver Spring, MD
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

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6 1-hour cassettes --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

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Customer Reviews

The story is so very good and teaches manners for children.
Bernice W. Batts
Some people today might think the book hopelessly outdated and completely irrelevant to modern life.
Wayne S. Walker
Too many stereotypes and too many shallow characters with not enough flavor made the book flat.
Dave Fernandes

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 27, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Little Lord Fauntleroy stirred my emotions. Would I have let my seven-year-old live with his ill-tempered grandfather who despised me? Probably not! Yet as the story unfolded, I admired the wise words and kind ways of Fauntleroy's mother, Dearest. I empathized with the mother's caring for her only child and her concern for the poor and less fortunate. This book renewed my faith in goodness and kindness. It made me reflect on all that I have.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By K. Gilligan on March 20, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
When I was little, two of my favorite books were A Little Princess and The Secret Garden (HarperClassics) by Frances Hodgson Burnett. When I grew up, they were still favorites. So a year ago when I was buying them for my little cousin, and I noticed "Little Lord Fauntleroy", I was astounded. How did I miss such a gem?

The story of little Cedric who warms his old grandfather's heart is beautifully written and quite touching. There is also a lesson to be learned, as we watch what Cedric does with his newfound wealth. What would you do if you were suddenly gifted with such a fortune? This story is perfect for anyone who enjoyed "A Little Princess" or "The Secret Garden"!
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 5, 1998
Format: Paperback
When the Earl of Fauntleroy decides to bring his favourite son's son to England from America, young Cedric's life is dramatically changed forever. With an ever-innocent and trusting perspective on life he manages to turn his bitter grandfather into a loving, generous man while also endearing himself to every other person he comes in contact with.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By L O'connor on November 6, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This delightful story has a reputation for being very sentimental, and it is, but it is also filled with humour. Cedric Errol, an all-American boy, discovers to his dismay that he is the heir to an English earldom, and has to go to England to live with his stern old grandfather, who despises Americans (he must have been reading the Guardian, I suppose). Gradually they learn to like each other, and the grandfather even comes around to liking Cedric's American mother. There is a melodromatic sub-plot involving a false heir, but the story is really interesting enough without it. The best character in the book is Cedric's friend Mr. Hobbs, a staunchly Republican grocer who despises earls "I'd like to catch one of em inside here; that's all!" he tells Cedric, before he knows Cedric is one of them "I'll have no graspin tyrants sittin round on my buiscuit barrels!" By the end of the book though, he has become so attached to Cedric that he sells his grocery business and settles in England, where he becomes an avid follower of aristocratic doings. He says he'll never return to America "It's a good enough country for them that's young and stirrin - but there's faults in it. there's not an aunt-sister among em - nor an earl!" Which pretty much sums up how I feel about America too.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By RA on October 25, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The company's service was good, but the book itself was full of printing errors. A large speech was absent at the end, and I caught that only because I'd looked it up; the ending made no sense without it. There was also computer code on the pages here and there in the middle of text. I definitely don't recommend this publisher's version of the book.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Joanne Madison T. on June 4, 2004
Format: Paperback
I found this book in my school library a year ago...and i think it was indeed,a very pleasant heartwarming story.So nice was that i even managed to catch Burnett's other titles!
Basically,this novel is about a boy living in America who realises that his long dead father was actually a lord's son back in old England.The story goes back when the lord's (youngest and favourite) son fell for a young maiden in America.So madly in love with her that he even dare to forsake his home,his title and his father to be with her.Despite they being poor,the trio led a fulfilling and wonderful life,that was,when the son was contracted with some incurable disease and died.
Back in England,the old sire (the lord,of course) never forgave his youngest son for his action.He never liked the maiden,either.Coincidence as it may be,the Lord's two oldest sons either died or ran away(sorry,but i can't remeber this part).Knowing that his time was up,and he needed a heir,the Lord called for his long-lost grandson to come stay with him in England.
For a boy who was born and bred in America,and had friends like the baker,the apple seller,the barber and roams round the street during his leisure time,moving in with a stern and grouchy old man in a cold castle was a far cry from his life in America.
The old Lord found children a nuisance,but had it not been a fact that he needs a heir,he'd have probably wished his grandson to continue rotting away in America.Cedric Roy (the protagonist and grandson)was nevertheless,the sweet and innocent 7-year-old.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kate Oszko on March 3, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I wanted to read this book because the idea of Little Lord Fauntleroy is such a part of our culture, but I knew nothing about the original. The child is sympathetically drawn (except for the fact of calling his mother "dearest" which I found odd) and charms all he comes in contact with. He is just an ordinary boy in the US when news comes to him that he will inherit his grandfather's title and is to go to England to learn to be a lord. The grandfather is wonderfully curmudgeonly, the mother is too good to be true, and of course there is a happy ending. There was gentle humour and I liked seeing the change in the old man. A pleasant read.
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