Little Moth (Xue Chan) (Institutional Use) NR

Amazon Instant Video

(3) IMDb 7.1/10

When an impoverished country couple adopts a crippled young girl and puts her to work begging on city streets, a battle soon ensues over her fate. Hubei Dialect with English subtitles.

Starring:
Yuanbing Gao, Dequn Han
Runtime:
1 hour 40 minutes

Little Moth (Xue Chan) (Institutional Use)

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Drama, International
Director Tao Peng
Starring Yuanbing Gao, Dequn Han
Supporting actors Qifa Hong, Zelin Xu, Xiaorong Zeng, Lei Zhang, Huihui Zhao
Studio dGenerate Films
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Nick Liptak on December 16, 2009
Format: DVD
"Suspenseful, moving yet ruthlessly unsentimental" - Jason Anderson, Eye Weekly

"A nearly perfect little film" - Shelly Kraicer

When an impoverished country couple adopts a crippled young girl and puts her to work begging on city streets, a battle soon ensues over her fate.

Luo Jiang and Guihua, a poor, middle-aged couple with few prospects, decide to buy an 11-year-old girl, Xiao Ezi (aka "Little Moth"), for $140 in rural China. Xiao Ezi's life is in peril, as she is forced to earn money for her new parents as a beggar while suffering from a blood disease that leaves her unable to walk. Her greedy adoptive father, Luo Jiang, refuses to buy her medicine, while Guihua's growing maternal affection wracks her with guilt. After a run-in with local extortionists, the three flee into the territory of the unsavory Mr. Yang, whose one-armed boy Xiao Chun is also forced to beg. Inevitably the grownups take turns taking advantage of each other, giving the children a rare opportunity to develop a protective bond with one another.

With virtually no budget, a hand-held digital camera and a cast of non-professionals, Peng Tao turns the sordid street life of small town China into a chain-reaction tale of human cruelty and unforgettable suspense. LITTLE MOTH "melds the anger and storytelling scope of Dickens, the doc-influenced immediacy and sensitive gaze of the Dardenne brothers, and the best tendencies of recent Chinese cinema." (Robert Koehler, Variety).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By .fgd on July 2, 2013
Format: DVD
This film is almost a documentary. The filming is at the speed of life and quite literally the camera-man will film the actors mundanely walking down the street or searching every bus in the garage. At these times, I got impatient watching paint dry. However the same technique used to show how the little girl gets abandoned , could not have been filmed in any other way without loss of integrity.
This is no drama but a series of events showing the little girl set to work, the squabbling over turf from a rival owner of another disabled boy, how she is purely used as a money-tree by her gaurdians without empathy. It could be dull because there is no actors or screen-play as such. However it was interesting to see what China looks like on a mundane level without having to fly out there as a tourist. It was quite flabbergasting watching the boy and girl kill time with no TV in a room. After sitting all day in the street, there must be such a void that climbing walls in frustration is irrelevant. The woman is described as dim-witted. She has maternal instincts but her idea of care is prosaic. She posits the suggestion of what children may grow up into without stimulation.
The ending is very moving and too real as an example of sympathy fatigue. Young children are cute but what if they are too disabled to be a darling doll, which was no doubt why she was sold by her parents in the first place.
It seems far-fetched that this film is priced at $300. ; it is too prosaic. However its realism is very unsual for an Asian film. It is all too real and for this it has to be as unexciting as real life is in the details. There are many viewers who would want to more entertained by cinematic skills. Others will be absorbed by this film's reality TV appeal. Before you fork out $300, this film can be found on netflix.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Amazon Instant Video
When an impoverished country couple adopts a crippled young girl and puts her to work begging on city streets, a battle soon ensues over her fate.

Luo Jiang and Guihua, a poor, middle-aged couple with few prospects, decide to buy an 11-year-old girl, Xiao Ezi (aka "Little Moth"), for $140 in rural China. Xiao Ezi's life is in peril, as she is forced to earn money for her new parents as a beggar while suffering from a blood disease that leaves her unable to walk. Her greedy adoptive father, Luo Jiang, refuses to buy her medicine, while Guihua's growing maternal affection wracks her with guilt. After a run-in with local extortionists, the three flee into the territory of the unsavory Mr. Yang, whose one-armed boy Xiao Chun is also forced to beg. Inevitably the grownups take turns taking advantage of each other, giving the children a rare opportunity to develop a protective bond with one another.

With virtually no budget, a hand-held digital camera and a cast of non-professionals, Peng Tao turns the sordid street life of small town China into a chain-reaction tale of human cruelty and unforgettable suspense. LITTLE MOTH "melds the anger and storytelling scope of Dickens, the doc-influenced immediacy and sensitive gaze of the Dardenne brothers, and the best tendencies of recent Chinese cinema." (Robert Koehler, Variety).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again