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Little Rock Girl 1957: How a Photograph Changed the Fight for Integration (Captured History) Library Binding – July 1, 2011


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Little Rock Girl 1957: How a Photograph Changed the Fight for Integration (Captured History) + Warriors Don't Cry: A Searing Memoir of the Battle to Integrate Little Rock's Central High
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 5 - 7
  • Lexile Measure: 1010L (What's this?)
  • Series: Captured History
  • Library Binding: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Compass Point Books (July 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0756544408
  • ISBN-13: 978-0756544409
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 9.2 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,499,955 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Little Rock Girl 1957 is a very short book- only about 65 pages long- about the power of the photograph on the right to bring the Civil Rights movement to the world's attention. The photo is one of the most powerful ones of the 20th century and certainl --NetGalley

Informative, includes index, timeline, glossary and a page for online resources. Touches upon journalism and the impact of a photo, and text itself is diverse enough for a broad range of grades (3rd and up). Haunting quote ""I had to learn...how to get fro --NetGalley

About the Author

Shelley Tougas worked in journalism and public relations before writing children’s books. She is the author of Little Rock Girl 1957: How a Photograph Changed the Fight for Integration, which was among Booklist’s 2011 Top Ten Editors’ Choices. Shelley lives, writes, and reads in North Mankato, Minnesota.

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Maxine McLister on November 11, 2011
Format: Paperback
On September 4, 1957 , nine black students were to meet at the home of the local head of the NAACP and, together with a police escort, they were to head to Little Rock's Central High School in an attempt to integrate the school. Unfortunately, Elizabeth Eckhorn's parents didn't own a phone so she didn't get the message. She arrived at the school first and alone and was immediately surrounded by an angry white mob.

Will Counts, a local photographer, was able to capture this event - a picture of a beautiful black teenager clutching her books to her chest, a stoic expression on her face. Directly behind her, among that sea of angry white faces, is a white girl about the same age as Elizabeth, her face twisted with hatred. This photo would eventually win Counts a Pulitzer Prize nomination but, more importantly, it forced a nation and the world to look into the true and ugly face of racism.

Author Shelley Tougas reveals this important period in America's history through photographs, extensive research, a comprehensive timeline, and interviews. She discusses what led up to this event - the Jim Crow laws which allowed segregation, the legal fight to end it, and the words and reactions of the people who risked so much for change. She also reveals what eventually happened to each of the Little Rock Nine both when they were finally able to enter the school (although not for long) and later in their lives.

She tells the story with amazing objectivity. She never allows her own opinions to colour the narrative and, in so doing, she makes the book that much more powerful.

This is a very short book (just 64 pages) aimed at children 8-14 but it is a book that everyone should read. It is, in many ways shocking and horrible but it is also hopeful.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By NYbooklover on November 14, 2011
Format: Paperback
Little Rock Girl 1957: How a Photograph Changed the Fight for Integration by Shelley Tougas is a great book which is informative and historical. It is a good book for children about fifth to eighth grade and a refresher course for adults. It has special write ups about Grace Lorch, Daisy Bates, Thurgood Marshall, and Governor Faubus. The book also contains a timeline and glossary which are very helpful. I especially enjoyed the pictures which I think will appeal to children. I learned a lot about this time period and what our nation was going through at that particular time. I also thought it was interesting to read about what became of the Little Rock Nine.

This book is about an African American fifteen year old named Elizabeth Eckford who tried to enter an all white high school in Little Rock, Arkansas on September 4, 1957 but was stopped by the Arkansas National Guard ordered by the governor of the state, Orval Faubus. Hazel Bryan who was walking behind Elizabeth screamed at her to go back home. A photographer named Will Counts of the local newspaper Arkansas Democrat captured on camera the grotesque face of Hazel screaming at Elizabeth which helped to start the fight for integration.

Eight other African American students arrived and were turned away. Their parents had received phone calls from Daisy Bates about a plan to keep them safe but Elizabeth's parents didn't get the message because they didn't have a phone.

This whole situation was a confrontation between the governor and the federal government. A federal judge ordered Governor Faubus to allow the Little Rock Nine to start school again. President Eisenhower sent the 101st Airbourne Division to enforce the order. He also federalized the National Guard which meant that the president had control instead of the governor.

This unbiased review was based on an electronic copy of the book provided by the publisher for the purpose of creating this review.
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Format: Paperback
This review is a first for The Dirty Lowdown, which is befitting since the subject of this book was also a first, although infinitely more courageous and important. This book, Little Rock Girl 1957, meant for readers ages eight through about fourteen. That makes this the first "JUVENILE" book we have reviewed here. That said, I know an awful lot of adults that could benefit from a refresher course in American History.

On September 4, 1957, less than two weeks from today, in Little Rock, Arkansas nine African American students defied their governor and started the fight to integrate Little Rock's Central High School. Now known as The Little Rock Nine, those children faced both physical, verbal and emotional abuse few of us will ever face. And, with few exceptions, could not and would not find protection or support in adults, teachers, their fellow students or the community. The fight was not won that day, and it wasn't won even that year or necessarily for years to come. Perhaps that fight still hasn't come to an end.

First, the book. The author, Shelley Marie Tougas set out to write a contemporary history aimed at an audience of fifth through eighth graders depicting an era that is every bit as important as many other milestones in American History. I think she achieved both goals. She researched the book very well, finding many photographs and interviews that haven't seen the light of day in decades. The interviews and recollections of the children who were on the front line that day and in days to come, are especially poignant. Further, Ms. Tougas did not color the narrative with her own feelings and emotions. This is well documented history that an eight year old could easily digest and an adult could profit from as well.
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More About the Author

Shelley Tougas writes fiction and nonfiction for tweens and teens. Shelley is a former journalist who also worked in public relations. Her award-winning book, "Little Rock Girl 1957: How a Photograph Changed the Fight for Integration," landed on the top ten lists of Booklist and School Library Journal. Shelley lives near the Twin Cities.

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Little Rock Girl 1957: How a Photograph Changed the Fight for Integration (Captured History)
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