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A Little Taste of Freedom: The Black Freedom Struggle in Claiborne County, Mississippi (The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture) Hardcover – November 21, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-0807829653 ISBN-10: 080782965X Edition: 1st

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"A wonderfully evocative work of history that is a welcome--and needed--addition to the literature on the civil rights movement." -- "Register of the Kentucky Historical Society"

Review

This is a model study. . . . A riveting read. . . . A compelling reminder that in many local communities across the South, the Civil Rights Act (1964) and the Voting Rights Act (1965) marked the beginning, not the end, of demonstrations that are most associated with the civil rights movement.--Journal of Southern History|This is a marvelous book--a riveting story of black activism in the latter days of the civil rights movement and the most comprehensive account of race relations in a southern community I have come across in years. The chapter on armed self-defense in the black community expands our definition of 'nonviolence.' Her documentation of the cozy relationship between the state's most visible black leader and the segregationist Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission is eye-opening, to say the least. A native of Claiborne County, Emilye Crosby had access to local leaders across the board, black and white. Modestly titled, A Little Taste of Freedom is a big book, a major contribution to the new civil rights historiography.--John Dittmer, DePauw University |Crosby has delivered an intimate, complex portrait of racial struggle in a critical area of the Deep South. [A Little Taste of Freedom] will stand as a model for community-level studies of the civil rights movement for years to come.--Journal of American History|[A Little Taste of Freedom] makes a significant contribution to civil rights movement scholarship and to the 21st century African American nonfiction canon.--Dunbar on Black Books|A wonderfully evocative work of history that is a welcome--and needed--addition to the literature on the civil rights movement.--Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
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Product Details

  • Series: The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture
  • Hardcover: 376 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; 1 edition (November 21, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 080782965X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807829653
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.5 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,507,849 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Stanley Hastings on July 5, 2006
Format: Paperback
Growing up in Port Gibson, Mississippi, during the era of civil rights struggles and the crippling economic boycott of the 1960s, I often wondered if this would ever be objectively chronicled and who would write the story. Emilye Crosby has done an excellent job in her research, and with the exception of a few minor errors (such as contraditory mileage between Port Gibson and Fayette and the implication that no white churches other than the Catholic welcomed blacks to worship in the 1960s when St. James Episcopal church did--though no blacks attended St. James at that time), this is probably the best overall account of the civil rights situation in Claiborne County I have ever read. The lengthy footnotes and bibliography are proof that the author did her homework with accuracy and caution. While it is a story many of us would like to forget and in which some white merchants from the era who are still alive are not portrayed in a flattering way, the fact remains that those things DID happen, and the fact that many of the principals themselves were cooperative and willing to be quoted brings to light some progress made toward racial reconciliation in recent years. While the author could have shown less personal bias against the Main Street program and the author of the Port Gibson bicentennial history in her concluding pages, I would still recommend this book to anyone interested in civil rights history and what can happen when merchants of ANY color don't treat their customers or townspeople right. That the U S Supreme Court sanctioned the behavior of the NAACP by ruling in their favor when the case against them launched by the while merchants was decided is both a chilling tale AND a cautionary message about the power of economic boycotts.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Melanie Winters on April 30, 2006
Format: Paperback
Professor Crosby delivers both a gripping narrative on the black freedom struggle in a single county of Mississippi and a nuanced argument that the movement happened locally, even though little acts of protest and boycott could have huge reverberations. Especially valuable is her synthesis of white and black perspectives on local events, and continual analysis of the stakes involved in who tells "the story" of the "stormy" 60s in Mississippi. Highly reccommended to anyone interested in freedom movements, African American history, or studies of race relations.
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