Live At Dana Point 1957

May 12, 2005 | Format: MP3

$17.82
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Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
1
4:22
30
2
6:44
30
3
4:11
30
4
6:15
30
5
9:25
30
6
7:11
30
7
6:19
30
8
5:50
30
9
5:11
30
10
4:45
Disc 2
30
1
7:34
30
2
4:58
30
3
3:29
30
4
4:31
30
5
5:47
30
6
5:20
30
7
5:16
30
8
6:45

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: December 8, 2008
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: VSOP Records
  • Copyright: 2004, V.S.O.P. RECORDS
  • Total Length: 1:43:53
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000QZY5TG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #759,285 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Tybone on October 17, 2005
Format: Audio CD
This has to be some of Warne's most inspired work ever captured.

His sound is absolutely beautiful troughout these 2 sides,and the ideas keep popping out fresh, and never before heard (and swinging to!). The piano player is a character,a little crazy, but warne seemes to respect him a lot. A gem!
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By BebopBoomer on March 26, 2006
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I'm not aware of any tenor player who sounds like Warne Marsh,and there surely were none back in 1957 when this was recorded. Almost all sax players have a sound which is more or less internally consistent, but Marsh's seems to be made up of three or four quite different ones. Sometimes it's big and full; at other times,thin and dry as smoke. In the upper register and the high harmonics beyond it (which he handles with amazing mastery, far beyond that of many far more celebrated players) he gets a clear,bright,unforced alto-like sound. And finally, there's a kind of splintered gargle (think Lester Young playing a hookah...), which description might make it sound awful,which it definitely does not,as he employs it. This enormous tonal variety is accentuated by his penchant for rapidly alternating from loud to soft and in-between,sometimes every two or three bars and at any and all tempos. Though he seems far more interested in the linear elaboration of harmony than in melody,nevertheless his improvisations are full of surprising and thrilling twists and turns. These traits, plus his rhythmic agility (he swings!) make him, IMHO, far more interesting and enjoyable than his fellow Tristano disciple Lee Konitz.

This recording contains some very fine playing by the young Warne Marsh. In addition,the fact that he's playing standards (and Charlie Parker) makes the utter originality of his harmonic/melodic approach stand out more clearly than it would if he confined himself to those rather monotonous Tristano-school "originals". The sound is,all things considering,pretty good,certainly good enough for anybody whose primary interest is in the music itself rather than in sound reproduction per se.
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