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Live At Leeds (25th Anniversary Edition)

Live At Leeds (25th Anniversary Edition)

February 28, 1995

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: February 28, 1995
  • Release Date: February 28, 1995
  • Label: Geffen
  • Copyright: (C) 1995 Geffen Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:17:00
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001NB1E4G
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (371 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,390 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

One of the best live albums ever.
Horse Snakes
All I can say is if you love good live music then this is the album for you.
Jeremy Simpson
This is a raw sounding live album which makes it great.
Zach Andrews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

119 of 120 people found the following review helpful By Michael Topper on September 25, 2001
Format: Audio CD
The Feb 14, 1970 Leeds show which provided The Who with their
first official live album is widely regarded by collectors
as not only one of the group's finest-ever shows, but one of the
greatest live shows in rock history. The original album included
only 35 minutes of the 120 minute show, and was still one of the greatest live albums ever; in 1995 that length was
more than doubled for the CD remaster, but the "Tommy" portion remained in the vaults. Fans had to be content with the bootleg "Leeds Complete" in order to hear the whole thing, until now. Whether or not the piecemeal way the concert has been
released over the years is a cynical MCA ploy or not, now that
we finally have the whole thing, the show can finally be heard
in all of its awesome power and glory.
One of the reasons "Leeds" is prized among Who collectors is
that it is one of the best-recorded; the mix is superbly
equalized among all three instruments and Daltrey's vocals, and Townshend's guitar sounds especially full-bodied and wet. The performance is one of the tightest and note-perfect of that
period--without losing any of its heat or raw power--and the
audience is amazingly quiet and respectful, which almost gives
the show a "live in the studio" quality. A comparison with
"Live At The Isle Of Wight", the only other complete Moon-era
performance of "Tommy", is in order: although both shows are extraordinary, "Leeds" is superior for the above
reasons (although "Wight" offers arguably better versions of "Young Man Blues" and "We're Not Gonna Take It/See Me Feel Me").
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69 of 73 people found the following review helpful By William M. Edwards on June 11, 2000
Format: Audio CD
When originally released, The Who's "Live at Leeds" was a quick glimpse of the lads pounding out the tough guy covers and original tunes live with astounding working class conviction. Even today, to listen to "Summertime Blues", "Substitute", or "Shakin' All Over" is akin to hearing these guys touch of the core of a Rock and Roll super collider. In their greatest moments, The Who achieved a chemistry during live performance that was as unique as it was astounding. Live at Leeds in 1970 caught some of those moments for the record, and was a nice portrait of the group before they stepped off into the Baba O'Riley years.
The newly released version only improves on the original by showing the group stretch themselves during their performances. "Heaven and Hell" and "Tattoo" respectively capture The Who performing material that is more challenging and, well, touching, yet every bit as rewarding as the more rocking numbers. There is no doubt that this album gives a clearer portrait of the musical range this group possessed, and is stronger for it.
Pete Townsend, who never sounded comfortable as a lead guitar player, clearly understands the strengths of his rhythym guitar playing here. Listen to him on "Amazing Journey/Sparks", two terribly underappreciated tunes from the rock opera "Tommy". Townsend's playing during this collage is amazing in it's straight ahead intensity, and runs the gamut from soft and ethereal to raucous and back. Together with Moon, Entwistle, and Daltrey, this number creates some of the most beautiful chaos I've ever heard. In short, Moon's playing throughout this album and on this song imparticular, is nothing short of remarkable.
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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Steve Parsons on August 14, 2003
Format: Audio CD
I have always considered The Who to be the greatest live band ever. Live at Leeds is a sure testament to that claim. However, MCA continually attempts to do the album justice by re-mixing, re-mastering, and releasing it until they finally have the perfect version. Unfortunately, the newest incarnation, Live at Leeds: Deluxe Edition, is far from perfect and while claiming to have been restored to its full concert length, the Tommy tracks have been placed on one disc and the non-Tommy tracks placed on the other. This is quite bothersome as Tommy was originally played before several non-Tommy tracks. Although the track listing has been altered, this isn't the biggest problem. It seems that too much noise reduction has been used and the tracks have an almost sterile sound (The 1995 release of Live at Leeds has better sound quality than Deluxe Edition). I recommend this release only to hardcore Who fans that collect for specifically archival reasons and I suppose for the packaging as well (which is quite nice). Otherwise, as another reviewer has said, go out and find the bootleg of the Leeds show entitled Live At Leeds: Complete. LALC has the original running order from beginning to end, with no edits. Basically it's just the original tape with no alterations made. The sound isn't so bright but it's very honest, raw and powerful. Here's my ratings:
LIVE AT LEEDS: DELUXE EDITION - *** (See above)
LIVE AT LEEDS (1995 Remaster) - ***** (Excellent sound quality and expanded to 15 tracks!
LIVE AT LEEDS COMPLETE - ***** (The original full length concert in brutal stereo! No edits!)
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