Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: The Blu-ray is in very good condition with the case having light shelf wear and is guaranteed to play perfectly. Eligible for *FREE* Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy means your satisfaction is guaranteed! A tracking number is provided in your Amazon account with every order.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $0.25
Learn More
Trade in now
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$11.49
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35.00. Details
Sold by: Outlet Promotions
Add to Cart
$12.99
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35.00. Details
Sold by: Anthony's Things For Sale
Add to Cart
$13.19
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35.00. Details
Sold by: turntostart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Live and Let Die [Blu-ray]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Live and Let Die [Blu-ray]


List Price: $19.99
Price: $11.49 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $8.50 (43%)
Only 3 left in stock.
Sold by MOVIE NATION and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
39 new from $6.19 28 used from $4.91 1 collectible from $49.99
Watch Instantly with Rent Buy
Other Formats & Versions Amazon Price New from Used from
Blu-ray 1-Disc Version
$11.49
$6.19 $4.91

Deal of the Day: Sons of Anarchy: Seasons 1-6 plus coupon for Season 7
Today only and while supplies last, save 47% on the Sons of Anarchy: Season 1-6 limited edition box-set plus receive a coupon code via email to get a copy of Sons of Anarchy: Season 7 to complete your collection. Offer ends December 18, 2014 at 11:59pm PST. Learn more


Frequently Bought Together

Live and Let Die [Blu-ray] + The Man with the Golden Gun [Blu-ray] + The Spy Who Loved Me [Blu-ray]
Price for all three: $34.08

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Product Details

  • Actors: Roger Moore, Yaphet Kotto
  • Directors: Guy Hamilton
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, AC-3, Color, Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, Dubbed, Subtitled, Widescreen, Closed-captioned
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 1.0), English (DTS-HD High Res Audio), French (Dolby Digital 5.1), Spanish (Dolby Digital 1.0)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Dubbed: French, Spanish
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Studio: Fox/MGM
  • DVD Release Date: October 21, 2008
  • Run Time: 121 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (337 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001AQT0WW
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,759 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Live and Let Die [Blu-ray]" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Audio commentary with Sir Roger Moore
  • Audio commentary with director Guy Hamilton
  • Audio commentary with screenwriter Tom Mankiewicz
  • Bond 1973: The Lost Documentary
  • Roger Moore as James Bond, Circa 1964 featurette
  • Live and Let Die conceptual art
  • 007 Mission Control interactive guide into the world of Live and Let Die
  • Inside Live and Let Die featurette
  • On set with Roger Moore featurettes

Editorial Reviews

James Bond battles the forces of black magic in this high-octane adventure that hurtles him from the streets of New York City to Louisiana’s bayou country. With charm, wit and deadly assurance, Roger Moore steps in as Agent 007 and takes on a powerful drug lord (Yaphet Kotto) with a diabolical scheme to conquer the world.

James Bond affronte les forces de la magie noire dans cette aventure trÃ(c)pidante qui l’entraÃ(r)ne des rues de New York aux bayous de la Louisiane. Avec son charme, son raffinement et son aplomb redoutable, Roger Moore incarne l’agent 007 pour la toute première fois et combat un puissant trafiquant de drogue (Yaphet Kotto) à la tête d’un complot diabolique visant à conquÃ(c)rir le monde.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Darren Harrison VINE VOICE on May 12, 2005
Format: DVD
In 1973 Roger Moore made a smooth transition from his most famous role - that of Simon Templar - to yet another literary character who had been made famous by another actor. Whereas the Saint had been immortalized by George Sanders in a series of movies much earlier (allowing Moore to make it his own in the highly successful television series), the memory of Sean Connery as James Bond was much more recent in the publics mind so Moore had his work cut out for him.
It is hardly surprising then that "Live and Let Die" plays it relatively safe. Moore went on record as saying that he read one line detailing how Bond had to kill once, but didn't very much like it (from the novel "Goldfinger"), and took his portrayal from that. In fact in his first couple of movies Moore plays the character much closer to his television Simon Templar persona than later in the series (the producers subsequently felt it was too close to Connery's interpretation of the role). This is a sad development as Moore never really had the chance to show he could play both charming and ruthless as he had plenty of chances to portray on The Saint.
Taking one of Fleming's most controversial novels (the villains are all black) the producers were faced with a vexing problem. They overcame this by not only giving Bond a black ally, but also allowing the villains to get the better of 007 on several occasions. They also threw in a redneck sheriff as comic relief for good measure.
The movie is essentially one long chase and in a definite break with tradition we are offered up a pretitles sequence in which James Bond does not appear.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Phillip C Mackey on July 29, 2000
Format: DVD
"Live and Let Die", released in 1973, is the eighth entry in the James Bond series produced by Cubby Broccoli and Harry Saltzman. It is also the debut of Roger Moore as the British secret agent, a role he would play of total of seven times, more that any other actor.
Sean Connery was originally slated to reprise his starring role but no amount of money could tempt him to sign on. The producers turned to an actor they had originally wanted to play Bond back in 1962, Roger Moore. At that time, Moore had to turn down the role because he was committed to play Simon Templar in the successful television series "The Saint". But by time "Live and Let Die" was ready to go into production, Moore was available to take on the role. Guy Hamilton did return to direct his third Bond film and "Live and Let Die" does have a feel similar to "Diamonds are Forever". Bernard Lee and Lois Maxwell reprised their roles as "M" and Miss Moneypenny but Desmond Llewelyn is notable for his absence, the only time "Q" has not appeared in a Bond film. Also missing, this time permanently, is the evil organization SPECTRE and its leader Blofeld. Except for one uncredited cameo, Blofeld never again appears in a Bond film.
In this outing, James Bond is investigating a series of murders targeting British intelligence. The one common thread appears to be the prime minister of the island nation of San Monique, Doctor Kananga, who is currently residing at his consulate in New York City. The CIA already has a team led by Bond's opposite number Felix Leiter keeping tabs on Kananga. Bond follows Kananga to Harlem where he meets another ruthless character named "Mr Big", the boss of bosses in the black underworld.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Stingray Ramone on June 1, 2003
Format: DVD
Roger Moore's debut as Bond, in terms of quality, is a so-so outing, as was expected. Moore brings about an aura distinct with that of Connery's. The Bond that Connery portrayed was more of the consummate professional type, serious, rather impatient, edgy, relying more on toughness and innate resourcefulness to see him through. On the other hand, Roger Moore concentrates on the finesse side of Bond. He is debonaire, more intuitive, more blueblooded in the sense he is articulated and sophisticated, and a definite poster child on what it is to be a British gentleman secret agent. Moore reflects the 70's, where poise and style rules and therefore more adequate than Connery to play Bond in this point of time. Live and Let Die lays the foundation of this revolutionized Bond attitude the next six films, with Moore at the helm.
Although Live and Let Die wasn't quite anything truly special in terms of overall story quality, besides Paul McCartney & the Wings' eerie, but memorable theme song, this film has to be one of, or if not Moore's most provocative and intriguing under his tenure as 007. First off, the mood and the pace of this particular episode has changed. Aside from the fact that the 70's feel prevails throughout, there is a supernatural, superstitious sense, a very foreign concept to the Bond series, even to this very day. There is a sense of mystery and unsettled emotion in Live and Let Die right from the get-go. Bond must investigate the enigmatic murders of three of his fellow agents: Dawes on the floor of the United Nations, Hamilton on a New Orleans street right in front of a funeral procession, and Baines who became part of a bizarre voodoo ritual on the island of San Monique. Getting a lead, 007 is on the trail for a Dr.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

Topic From this Discussion
Do Amazon's Jame Bond blu-rays include the Quantum of Solace movie cash?
Yes it should have them in each one.
Nov 29, 2008 by Jason Gelnett |  See all 4 posts
Have something you'd like to share about this product?
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions

MOVIE NATION Privacy Statement MOVIE NATION Shipping Information MOVIE NATION Returns & Exchanges