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Live & Unedited: Historic 1965 Carnegie Hall Enhanced, Live

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Audio CD, Enhanced, Live, September 30, 2003
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Live & Unedited: Historic 1965 Carnegie Hall + Horowitz In Moscow + Horowitz: The Last Recording
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Editorial Reviews


Disc: 1
1. Organ Toccata, Adagio And Fugue In C Major, BWV 564 I. - J.S. Bach
2. Organ Toccata, Adagio And Fugue In C Major, BWV 564 II. - J.S. Bach
3. Organ Toccata, Adagio And Fugue In C Major, BWV 564 III. - J.S. Bach
4. Fantasy In C Major, Op.17 (I)
5. Fantasy In C Major, Op.17 (II)
6. Fantasy In C Major, Op.17 (III)
7. Piano Sonata No. 9 In F Major, Op. 68 'Black Mass' - Scriabin
8. Poeme In F-Sharp Major, Op. 32, No. 1 - Scriabin
Disc: 2
1. Mazurka In C-Sharp Minor, Op. 30, No.4 - Chopin
2. Etude No. 8 In F Major, Op. 10 - Chopin
3. Ballade in G Minor, Op. 23, No.1 - Chopin
4. Serenade For The Doll No.3 - DeBussy
5. Etude In C-Sharp Minor, Op.2, No.1 - Scriabin
6. Etude No. 11 In A-Flat Major, Op.72 - Moszkowski
7. Traumerei
8. Kinderszenen, Op. 15 (1)
9. Kinderszenen, Op. 15 (2)
10. Kinderszenen, Op. 15 (3)
See all 20 tracks on this disc

Product Details

  • Audio CD (September 30, 2003)
  • Number of Discs: 3
  • Format: Enhanced, Live
  • Label: Sony
  • ASIN: B0000CF314
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #90,275 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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97 of 99 people found the following review helpful By Hank Drake VINE VOICE on October 1, 2003
After years of controversy, Sony has released Vladimir Horowitz's 1965 comeback recital for the first time in unedited form. The return of Horowitz to public performance after an absence of twelve years was the Classical music event of the 1960s. The pianist had been rehearsing in Carnegie Hall for months before he announced a recital, scheduled for May 9, 1965. He had reacquainted himself with the Hall's acoustics, but could not prevent his shaky nerves from asserting themselves on the day of the concert. Horowitz arrived at Carnegie Hall very late, and his tardiness made the audience as nervous as he was. To make matters worse, Columbia Records ordered the Hall's noisy air-conditioning turned off, which quickly turned the packed auditorium into a sauna.
Thus, the odds were against Horowitz when he stepped on stage to a tumultuous welcome. To deny the fact that his nerves got the better of him during the opening trial-by-fire Bach-Busoni Toccata is to deny reality. Mixed in with the grandeur of Horowitz's conception, and the dazzle of some passages, are numerous slips of finger. This recording serves to illustrate the fact that the merits of live and studio recordings are weighed in different scales. (There exists in RCA's vaults a 1950 studio recording from Horowitz which outdoes the 1965 version both musically and technically, but it has never been released.)
Schumann's Fantasy is given a rich, vibrant, and ardent performance, which recalls the composer's passionate love for Clara Wieck. The first movement features an array of tonal color which Horowitz could never achieve in the recording studio; in the March Horowitz brings to the fore Schumann's almost obsessive dotted rhythms.
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48 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Michael W. Taylor on October 1, 2003
This realization is a necessity for anyone who is, and isn't, familiar with this legendary concert.
It can be argued that Vladimir Horowitz presented two of the most important recitals of the 20th century, 1986 in Moscow, and this one, his Carnegie Hall comeback concert. May 9, 1965.
What makes this release so important is the fact that this is the first time that this performance is presented fully restored and unedited. That is what makes this album as much a historical artical as album since there have been numerous accounts written about this concert.
It is shocking to hear this concert as it becomes quite apparent that Horowitz' performance of the Bach-Busoni Toccata in C and the Schumann Fantasy were both heavily edited. In the original release of the cocnert, the opening runs in the Toccata are much slower and more crisp. In addition, at the end of the 2nd movement of the Schumann, Horowitz makes some glaring mistakes and almost loses all control.
Almost all accounts of this concert talk about the atmospere and mood surrounding this performance. Electricity was in the air, as well as volumes of nervous energy. No one knew what was going to happen in this concert as it was well known that Horowitz was extremely nervous. The general feeling documented was that Horowitz survived the first half of the program (Bach-Busoni and Schumann) and in doing so, was born again.
A discerning lister will be able to sense this mood and can tell how nervous Horowitz is in his playing (especially during the first movement of the Bach-Busoni). In my opinion, you can hear his confidence grow as the concert progresses, which makes the finale, the Chopin Ballade in G Minor, all the more exciting!
There is no real way to place a rating on this album in terms of stars. It just could be the most important classical release in the past 20 years.
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33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 27, 2003
The fuss that some fans of the late Vladimir Horowitz have been making about this newly issued "unedited" version of the celebrated May 9, 1965 recital (in which the pianist made his first public appearance in 12 years) is perplexing. In the accompanying booklet, Sony states only that the original LP release, which has been available on CD for more than 10 years, "included a number of unacknowledged edits to correct errors and imperfections."

By choosing not to be more specific, Sony has thus tacitly invited buyers to make phrase-by-phrase comparisons. More importantly, they are explicitly promising Horowitz fans that if they buy this three disc set they will get something important they didn't get the first time they bought it. But the only REALLY new things in this set are a bonus DVD containing outtakes from the film, "Vladimir Horowitz: The Last Romantic" and re-mastered sound that is an improvement upon the original

Sony claims that the "edits [on the original release] have always been the subject of controversy." But the only important edit on the original release was made in the coda of the second movement of the Schumann Fantasy, in which about a minute before the end of the movement Horowitz lost control of the piece for a few seconds. This was no big deal. Most pianists fear this coda - its wide, fast leaps in contrary motion in both hands make it one of the most dangerous places in the repertory -- and often let their intimidation adversely affect their motor skills. Horowitz was no exception, but he recovered and finished the coda. The performance was issued with the coda corrected from the patch session at Carnegie a few days later.

Otherwise, it seems that one would need a microscope to discover any significant differences between the performances.
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