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Live Without A Net Mass Market Paperback – July 1, 2003


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Roc Trade; First Edition edition (July 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451459253
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451459251
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,245,330 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Taking a post-Internet, post-computerized world as its unifying theme, Anders's (The Making of Star Trek: First Contact) uneven anthology showcases 18 mostly male British authors (not all of whom will be familiar to U.S. readers), whose contributions range from disconnected, inconclusive pieces to delightful shaggy-dog stories. Most focus on sophisticated biological technologies, such as Charles Stross's provocative "Rogue Farm," about "multi-human beings" and Stephen Baxter's sad little tale about slave-drones and successive revolutions, "Conurbation 2473." Other established names include Michael Swanwick, David Brin, Rudy Rucker and S.M. Stirling. But the longest entry belongs to relatively obscure Brit John Meaney. In Meaney's entertaining novella, "The Swastika Bomb," bioform animals serve as tanks, airplanes, bombs and deadly viruses, against an alternative history of the Battle of Britain in which the Axis and the Allies race to develop a nucleic instead of a nuclear bomb. All the stories are competently written, but few leave a lasting impression.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

About the Author

Lou Anders is an editor, author, and journalist. He is the editorial director of Prometheus Books' science fiction imprint Pyr, as well as the anthologies Outside the Box, Live Without A Net, and Projections: Science Fiction in Literature & Film. He is the author of The Making of Star Trek: First Contact, and has published over 500 articles in such magazines as The Believer, Dreamwatch, Star Trek Monthly, Star Wars Monthly, Babylon 5 Magazine, Sci Fi Universe, Doctor Who Magazine, and Manga Max.

More About the Author

A 2011 Hugo Award winner, 2013/2012/2010/2009/2008/2007 Hugo Award nominee, 2011 Locus Award finalist, 2010 Shirley Jackson Award nominee, 2008 Philip K. Dick Award nominee, 2013/2012/2011/2010/2009/2007 Chesley Award nominee/nominee/winner/nominee, and 2006/2011 World Fantasy Award nominee, Lou Anders is the editorial director of Prometheus Books' science fiction and fantasy imprint Pyr, as well as the anthologies Masked (Gallery Books, July 2010), Swords & Dark Magic (Eos, June 2010, coedited with Jonathan Strahan), Fast Forward 2 (Pyr, October 2008), Sideways in Crime (Solaris, June 2008), Fast Forward 1(Pyr, February 2007), FutureShocks (Roc, January 2006), Projections: Science Fiction in Literature & Film (MonkeyBrain, December 2004), Live Without a Net (Roc, 2003), and Outside the Box (Wildside Press, 2001). In 2000, he served as the Executive Editor of Bookface.com, and before that he worked as the Los Angeles Liaison for Titan Publishing Group. He is the author of The Making of Star Trek: First Contact (Titan Books, 1996), and has published over 500 articles in such magazines as The Believer, Publishers Weekly, Dreamwatch, DeathRay, free inquiry, Star Trek Monthly, Star Wars Monthly, Babylon 5 Magazine, Sci Fi Universe, Doctor Who Magazine, and Manga Max. His articles and stories have been translated into Danish, Greek, German, Italian & French. His first novel, Frostborn, book one in a three-book middle grade fantasy adventure series called Thrones and Bones, was published in August 2014 by Random House's Crown Books for Young Readers. See www.thronesandbones.com for more.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By James A. Owen on July 1, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This anthology was my first exposure to Lou Anders' work as an editor, and I found myself very, very impressed.
I'm a choosy SF reader, and anthologies in particular drive me nuts. I've been rereading DANGEROUS VISIONS for years, and the one bright spot annually is Windling and Datlow's BEST FANTASY AND HORROR - basically, I have to be force-fed anything new.
I was offered an advance copy of LIVE WITHOUT A NET, started reading with no small trepidation, and found myself devouring it. Anders' choices are stunningly good, and his taste in material impeccable. Swanwick, Roberson, and Meaney's contributions may be some of the finest short fiction I've ever read, and the rest of the material held a similar line of quality.
Quit reading this and just go buy the book. Trust me - it's worth the price and then some.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By "causticcharmer" on October 1, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is an excellent compilation of stories. If you are interested in understanding how science fiction and fantasy are morphing into a new and facinating genre, then I highly recomend this book. It is a snapshot of the medium as it reaches a tipping point and shoots into the future. I have bought 4 books from authors whose short stories I read in this anthology. I highly recommend this book not only for the content, but also for the reading lists it will help you build.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By "mark.watson@bestsf.net" on July 1, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
For me the best picks from this volume are those where the authors really get to grips with the idea of a future that has not followed the usual technological route, particularly Di Filippo and Rucker. On the more traditional SFnal front Melko and Del Stone Jr provide more than the bigger names of Brin and Baxter, and Resnick/Kenyon, Hutchinson, Meaney and Stross provide top quality stuff.
All in all, an interesting varied collection, and well worth the shelf-space....
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mark Davidson on November 12, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a spotty collection. The premise -- a world without computers -- is certainly interesting. The antho, sadly, did not live up to its potential.

Some of the stories are excellent, thought-provoking, and moving: Alex Irvine's "Reformation," Del Stone Jr.'s "I Feed the Machine," and John Meaney's "The Swastika Bomb." A few were truly dreadful -- loosely related at best and/or more style than substance -- including a couple I couln't even make it through. Most were solid, but still dissapointing, on topic, but not credible as to how or why computers weren't in this world. One, John Grant's "No Solace for the Soul in Digitopia," was simply porn with (at its end) a veneer of alternate-universe's clothing.

The closest thing to a common thread was biotech of one sort or another replacing some functions of silicon computing, and the inherent differences of the two computing approaches. When done well (about half the time), that made for something to think about.
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