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Lives of the Scientists: Experiments, Explosions (and What the Neighbors Thought) Hardcover – July 9, 2013


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Frequently Bought Together

Lives of the Scientists: Experiments, Explosions (and What the Neighbors Thought) + Lives of the Artists: Masterpieces, Messes (and What the Neighbors Thought) + Lives of Extraordinary Women: Rulers, Rebels (and What the Neighbors Thought)
Price for all three: $29.46

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 4 - 7
  • Lexile Measure: 1120L (What's this?)
  • Series: Lives of...
  • Hardcover: 96 pages
  • Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers (July 9, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0152059091
  • ISBN-13: 978-0152059095
  • Product Dimensions: 10.5 x 8.8 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #39,230 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 5-8–Another wonderful addition to the series, detailing common knowledge and little-known facts about historical figures. Krull asks the question, “What were these men and women like as human beings–in the laboratory and out of it?” She answers it well, giving a multifaceted picture of 20 scientists' personal lives and professional accomplishments, though more information about some of the lesser-known individuals might have provided a better idea of their work. Readers learn about great discovery and great quirkiness. James D. Watson and Francis Crick figured out the structure of DNA, but apparently Watson was in it just to meet girls. Albert Einstein developed the theory of relativity but described his good friend Marie Curie as “not attractive enough to represent a danger to anyone” when she became enamored of a married man. Edwin Hubble had a passion for the stars but had the obnoxious habit of trying to sound smarter than his guests by wowing them with obscure information he looked up in an encyclopedia before parties. A strong point of this volume is the inclusion of some important women (Barbara McClintock and Grace Murray Hopper, for example) who aren't often mentioned in biographies of this type. The oil paint illustrations are whimsical and fun and break up the text, making the amount of information more manageable. This estimable introduction to a variety of scientists will also appeal to fans of irreverent history who aren't quite ready for Georgia Bragg's macabre How They Croaked (Walker, 2011).–Trina Bolfing, Westbank Libraries, Austin, TXα(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

From Booklist

This latest in the Lives of . . . series is summed up by the subtitle’s What the Neighbors Thought. The authors delve into intriguing, obscure, and peculiar facts about 20 famous scientists from all fields of study, regions of the globe, and eras of history. Even with the brevity of each biography, the authors manage to paint an honest and multidimensional portrait of each individual. The real people behind infamous discoveries include one who could write while at a full gallop on horseback, some who were arrested for not wavering from their beliefs, others who were born to slaves and peasants, and several who were disliked by their teachers. Women are well represented, including Grace Murray Hopper, named the first Computer Science Man of the Year. As in each edition of the series, Hewitt’s highly caricaturized illustrations enhance the engaging narratives. This collective biography is perfectly suited to thematic research as well as to reading for pleasure. Grades 4-7. --Erin Anderson

More About the Author

KATHLEEN KRULL is well known for her innovative, award-winning nonfiction for young readers, which includes the successful Lives of... series. Kathleen Krull lives in San Diego, CA. Visit her at www.kathleenkrull.com AND http://facebook.com/kathleen.krull

Customer Reviews

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See all 8 customer reviews
The illustrations are fantastic!
Sheila F. Rubio
Within minutes, he had his nose buried in it and finished the book the next afternoon.
Amazon Customer
I think it's very appealing to children and would make a great gift.
saadiqa ali

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By mummy of 3 on December 9, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Wonderfully captivating read for my 4th grader. Homosexuality reference totally overblown - even if your child picks up on this (a one liner in the extra credit section) who wouldn't rather explain this to their child than lynching. Please.
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31 of 44 people found the following review helpful By l. martin on October 6, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The authors felt the need to include that there were "unproven rumors" that a particular scientist was homosexual. I teach elementary students and, with that one unnecessary line, I now cannot include this book in my classroom library as it is not my place to explain homosexuality to my students. Why they felt compelled to print that bit of unrelated trivia in a CHILDREN'S book about scientists is beyond me. Do not purchase this book for your classroom!
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10 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on August 3, 2013
Format: Hardcover
My 8 year-old son received this book as a present last week. He was quickly attracted by the quirky and engaging artwork. Within minutes, he had his nose buried in it and finished the book the next afternoon. Along the way, he peppered me with a host of just the sort of questions you want your kid to ask, such as "Why is DNA shaped like a double helix?" and "Why aren't they sure when George Washington Carver was born?" This book offers a very smart mix of biography and history. And let me say that as a University Historian, I'm generally unhappy with the level of history presented in kids' books. But Krull manages to highlight her subject's talents without presenting them as one-dimensional heroes or geniuses. Instead she presents these scientists as often quirky and flawed but nonetheless important and creative people. Very well done, indeed!

Got a smart son or daughter? They need this book.
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By DeeAnn on July 3, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My Grandson loves this book!
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