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Living Large: From SUVs to Double Ds---Why Going Bigger Isn't Going Better Hardcover – Bargain Price, October 26, 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press (October 26, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312540256
  • ASIN: B0068EPSMC
  • Product Dimensions: 5.8 x 0.9 x 8.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,609,216 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Wexler, a staff writer for Allure magazine, spent three years on the road, investigating America's worship at "the Church of Stuff." Wexler dives into America's new normal where bigger is better and our landscape is dominated by starter castles, Barbie boobs, megachurches and megamalls, jumbo engagement rings, mammoth cars, and landfills visible from space. By turns horrified, tempted, incredulous, guilt-ridden, mystified, and captivated by these excesses, Wexler approaches her subject with a compassion born of her own complicity (she's an SUV driver and enjoys her shopping). Though the book covers increasingly familiar postrecession "the party's over" territory with the depth of an extended magazine piece, Wexler brings a friendly first-person perspective to her study of surfeit and of the psychology behind our compulsion to consume and squander, why "living large" is defended by some as our "God-given right as Americans" and in other cases, might be downright unavoidable.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“[Wexler’s] witty narrative makes her supersize warning easy to swallow and hard to ignore.” People Magazine, 3 ½ stars (of 4)

“Wexler reminds us that Americans have completely lost perspective, both literally and figuratively… Amusing and timely.” —Kirkus Reviews

“By turns horrified, tempted, incredulous, guilt-ridden, mystified, and captivated by these excesses, Wexler approaches her subject with a compassion born of her own complicity (she's an SUV driver and enjoys her shopping)… Wexler brings a friendly first-person perspective to her study of surfeit and of the psychology behind our compulsion to consume and squander.” —Publishers Weekly

“Wexler takes us on the most insightful couch-potato tour of American excess out there.… Filled with the comic irony of a Stewart or Colbert.” —John de Graaf, coauthor of Affluenza: The All-Consuming Epidemic

"I'll just say it, since someone has to: This is a hugely entertaining book." —A.J. Jacobs, author of The Guinea Pig Diaries and The Year of Living Biblically

“Perfectly timed. This is a gorgeous romp of sharp cultural criticism by one of America's big new voices.” —Jeanne Marie Laskas, award-winning author of Growing Girls


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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Erie on November 1, 2010
Format: Hardcover
The author's bright, refreshing insights made for a delightful afternoon of reading. Wexler's straightforward, though nuanced, descriptions had me sitting alongside her in places I never imagined - like the driver's seat of a Hummer or the examining table of a plastic surgeon who does boob jobs. Analyzing and balancing her own modern day wants and shoulds with wit and wisdom led me to question my own values in a comfortable, nonthreatening way. What was said and how it was said made me smile - a lot.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Paul Tognetti TOP 500 REVIEWER on August 30, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Frankly, I could never quite understand the mentality. When I was growing up it was every parents dream that their children would simply have a bit better life than the one that they experienced. For those of us who grew up in double-deckers in working-class neighborhoods that step up might be a small single family home in a suburban neighborhood. But for many baby boomers and those in subsequent generations this was simply not good enough. Good economic times spawn inflated expectations and all of a sudden people were demanding much bigger houses, larger vehicles and well, super-sized everything. Author Sarah Z. Wexler grew up in a household where many of the values touted by the hippies of the 1960's were espoused. But soon enough her parents changed their tune and so did she. She still can't believe she "sold out". In her new book "Living Large: From SUVs to Double Ds, Why Going Bigger Isn't Going Better" Sarah Wexler explores why Americans became so fascinated with gigantic homes, big-box retailers, and ever-larger and incredibly inefficient vehicles. It seems that the demand for "bigger and better" infiltrated all facets of our lives and today our nation is reaping the consequences of so many foolish decisions.

In "Living Large" Sarah Wexler devotes a chapter each to 11 different subjects. In the chapter entitled "The McMansion Expansion" she points out that "the average American home ballooned from 983 square feet in 1950 to 2349 square feet in 2004, a 140 percent increase in size." What makes this so disturbing is that due to our declining birth rate there is on average one fewer person residing in these houses than there were 50 years ago. Furthermore, many of these homes are poorly built and the cost to heat and cool them is astronomical.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Njmovascpa on December 5, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It's not often a book that is so interesting and informative is also so much fun to read, and so thought provoking. This book would be a great choice for a book club to discuss. Wexler covers a broad enough range of topics that every reader will find a "favorite" chapter. Whether or not you have ever thought about driving a huge car, having breast augmentation surgery, or rolling the world's largest ball of twine, you'll enjoy Wexler's explorations into those worlds. And what vacationer or shopper hasn't had trouble finding her way around a huge hotel complex or a giant shopping mall? Go with Sarah Z. Wexler, and let her help you find your own way around.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A.B. on December 10, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Really enjoyable read. Very well written: entertaining, interesting, insightful and informative. Skilled command of language. Really unique combination of ideas. The juxtaposition of the make-a-wish shopping trip with Wal-mart is particularly clever. The trip to Harold's NY Deli in Edison, NJ is another enlightening escapade. Ms. Wexler really has a let-it-all-hang-out writing style. The book is very informative in a very entertaining way and must have involved a tremendous amount of research.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E Reader on August 28, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Well-written, provocative, insightful, and entertaining.
The author offers a wealth of information without making the task of reading it arduous. I'd even go so far as to call it a 'light read' because reading it was fully enjoyable. It gave me lots of fun facts to share with people, too.
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