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Living in Shadows: How to Help the Stray Cat in Your Life (Without Adding To the Problem) Paperback – April 1, 2002


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Frequently Bought Together

Living in Shadows: How to Help the Stray Cat in Your Life (Without Adding To the Problem) + Feral Cat Rescue: Tips and Techniques for Caregivers + The Stray Cat Handbook (Howell reference books)
Price for all three: $28.05

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Amythyst Pub (April 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1931395004
  • ISBN-13: 978-1931395007
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #870,986 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

For readers sharing her concern about wild cats,this is an excellent guide for letting them know what they can do. -- Henry Berry, book reviewer, The Small Press Book

LIVING IN SHADOWS is well-written, giving the reader a clear and useful guide to loving homeless cats. I loved it! -- Jennifer LB Leese @ ASTORYWEAVERs Book Reviews©, http://www.geocities.com/ladyjiraff/aswbr.html

About the Author

Ann K. Fisher, like many others, has had a lifelong commitment to helping all types of animals. Several years ago she noticed a feral cat and her kittens camping in her yard. Ann wanted to take care of them but could find little worthwhile information (and much misinformation) about the subject. In the process, Ann became an expert on stray and feral cats. She learned to feed, tame, and care for these and many others, taming a number to become indoor pets. Ann's mission is to make a difference in the exploding cat population, and to improve both the lives of pet owners and the lives of stray and feral cats.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

50 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Gesine - cat rescuer on August 18, 2005
Format: Paperback
We do and teach a lot of rescue/TNR, and found this book to have many errors/omissions. Some examples:

p. 19 there is *not* controversy over whether domestic cats are really domesticated. They are. Again, p. 39 -- "would you bring the same animal in the house if it was a raccoon or squirrel?" Feral cats are not wild animals as raccoons and squirrels are; this is a very significant difference, and this is a very misleading comparison.

p. 23 In discussion of "is cat a feral or stray", no mention is made of the ethical necessity to **list as found** any cat you can even remotely touch. Many lost pet cats can present as quite scared. If your cat were missing, you would want finders to err on the side of listing every found cat as found!

p. 45 Very misleading info on FIV (feline immunodeficiency virus). The typical first test for FIV tests for *antibodies*, not antigen -- thus, kittens can test FIV+ from maternal antibodies. With time, they clear the maternal antibodies. We have encountered many litters of kittens who initially tested FIV+, *all* of whom subsequently retested FIV-. There's no mention here of the need to have a test/retest protocol. (For great flowcharts, see [...]

p. 22 "Feral cats are happier in the wild and are never really happy being confined". This is a mythical overgeneralization. We have done a lot of TNR in dense inner-city settings, and have brought a number of feral cats inside in various places, because their colony habitat was being destroyed (construction, redevelopment, etc.). Most former ferals, if they are kept inside with decent care, some windows, scratching and climbing posts, cat company, do quite well. A very small percent really want to be back in their colony.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Cathy Goodwin TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 27, 2002
Format: Paperback
That skinny cat keeps coming to your back door. When you show any interest, he dashes away. What is the kindest thing to do? Keep leaving out food? Call the local Humane Society? Trap him?
Ann Fisher offers no-nonsense guidance in what has to be one of the most unusual how-to books ever written. She doesn't mince words. Some feral cats will never be tamed. Think about your investment of time and money. Set limits.
Still, your feral cats may become part of your household, even if they live in the back yard. By spaying even one cat, you are doing a lot of good. And if you are not in a position to help a cat first-hand, Fisher provides a list of cat-saving organizations that will be very grateful for your donations.
Here's the perfect gift for your cat-fanatic friends who, like me, hope to evolve into little old ladies who live for their cats.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 26, 2002
Format: Paperback
I recently adopted a stray cat from my neighborhood, and this guide was extremely useful when it came to trapping my new cat.
Not only were the instructions for trapping the cat easy to follow, I was even able to locate a trap by using the resource guide in the back of the book!
This book is much needed and beautifully written. I highly recommend it to anyone who has ever had or is thinking about adopting any stray cat!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Health nuttybuddy on March 26, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
We knew nothing when a stray, wild small cat adopted our driveway and wouldn't leave. After pretending he wasn't there, we couldn't take it anymore watching him starve to death and his pitiful meows. We started feeding him and he staked a claim on our front porch and yard. Then we didn't know what to do with him, as he looked so sweet but would shred us with his razor sharp claws if we touched him. This book saved us, it educated us on what to do properly, and what not to do. We ended up 'keeping' him rather than throwing him away to the animal control people to euthanize him. He will always be an outdoor, feral cat, but he has brought us much joy and acts like we are his cat peeps.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By jeannette t spencer on December 22, 2013
Format: Paperback
I felt that I needed to understand how to relate with these poor cats who were discarded by people sometime in their life or their parents life. When you don't see; you tend to not think of the invisible….they suffer quietly and do not have a voice. At 56; I finally thought about them when my 80 year old mother came to live with me. Mom enjoyed looking at wildlife and my brother built a squirrel feeder where we saw two small sister cats eating bird seed. They had to be hungry, but they were so afraid of me and any people. I started to research and tried to find out what I could.

This book lets you understand that they are in the shadows; watching, afraid but yet needing our help. By reading this book; you can have an understanding of feral cats; how to approach them and how you can help them.
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