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Comment: Condition: Very good condition., Binding: Paperback. / Publisher: Prometheus Books / Pub. Date: 1994-09 Attributes: Book / Stock#: 2070232 (FBA) * * *This item qualifies for FREE SHIPPING and Amazon Prime programs! * * *
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Living Without Religion Paperback – September 1, 1994


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 159 pages
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books (September 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0879759291
  • ISBN-13: 978-0879759292
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,525,874 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Paul Kurtz (1925-2012), professor emeritus of philosophy at the State University of New York at Buffalo and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, was the author or editor of more than fifty books, including The Transcendental Temptation, The Courage to Become, and Embracing the Power of Humanism, plus nine hundred articles and reviews. He was the founder and chairman of Prometheus Books, the Institute for Science and Human Values, the Center for Inquiry, the Council for Secular Humanism, and the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry. He appeared on many major television and radio talk shows and has lectured at universities worldwide.

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Reticuli on June 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
You think this book is harsh on theists? Attend a conference where Kurtz is speaking. I guarantee you'll find Eupraxophy a pleasant and considerate view against theism! Kurtz tends to verge on believer -- believing there is no god, instead of simply not believing in one. This is a thin line, but many non-theists find themselves stepping over it inadvertently. This book is pretty centered and deals more in line with reasonable assumptions, though not exactly. There is a good deal of philosophical and religious history that I found quite interesting. Kurtz and I are like-minded when he avoids absolutism, but he can be very ornery sometimes. Theists beware: you will probably either not understand these concepts, or just get really, really angry.
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45 of 47 people found the following review helpful By D. Gallen on February 17, 2000
Format: Paperback
Living Without Religion is a book that sincerely made me look at a lot of misbeliefs I was raised to believe as a child. A lot of people think that if human beings do not believe in some phantom deity to keep us in line, society will drift into anarchy and chaos. This simply is not true (Look at Western Europe & Australia today!). You really can live a great life without religion,Which many people do, and Paul Kurtz explains exactly how to do so.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Chris Efinda on June 7, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Excellent research, and written with no bias to allow the reader decide to make up his mind. I'll recommend it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By PhilosopherZeus on August 18, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book is usually considered to be the third volume in a trilogy comprising a development of humanist ideas: The Transcendental Temptation: A Critique of Religion and the Paranormal provided the critique of religion and paranormal claims, Forbidden Fruit: The Ethics of Secularism gave a basis for secular ethics, and this book shows us how it can be applied in practice. Although all three books provide a grand picture of secular humanism, any of these can be read on their own.

This book provides the reader with the following: (i) what Humanism is and how it understands and approaches the world; (ii) looks at several definitions of religion and explores the concept of what religion means and represents; (iii) looks at how a Humanist worldview can be implemented as a constructive aspect of society.

In regards to developing these three points, Kurtz comes up with a new term: Eupraxophy (or, as he has amended the spelling in later writings: Eupraxsophy). Although this term has not caught on within the humanist community (or the world at large), I think the term is useful. At the very least it can be instructive for the reader in helping understand how one can develop a "good conduct and wisdom in living" in comparison to other world views.

This book, then, is to be recommended for the short and concise way in which it presents a humanist perspective, evaluates what religion is, and how a constructive and positive humanism can positively be developed and put into practice in society.
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21 of 33 people found the following review helpful By M. A. Plus on July 15, 2001
Format: Paperback
Kurtz coined the word "eupraxophy" to distinguish Secular Humanism from belief systems usually considered "religions." Eupraxophy accepts the best ethical principles of historical philosophies and religions, but disentangles them from the superstitions of theism (e.g., Christianity), while combining them with the pursuit of rigorous philosophical and scientific inquiry, which is missing in Eastern ethical systems like Confucianism and Buddhism.
Critics have complained that "eupraxophy" is hard to pronounce, and in his later writings Kurtz has been spelling it with an extra "s," as in "eupraxsophy." But I don't see why its pronounciation with the original spelling is any harder than pronouncing "saxophone." This book is a significant contribution to our understanding and classification of worldviews, though it could benefit from a discussion of more recent eupraxophies like Objectivism and Transhumanism.
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