Living Through the Hoop and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $75.00
  • Save: $10.49 (14%)
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Friday, April 18? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Average used book with normal wear. * Immediately ships direct from Amazon.com. Item eligible for PRIME & SUPER SAVER SHIPPING, with world-class customer support. *
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Living through the Hoop: High School Basketball, Race, and the American Dream Hardcover


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$64.51
$5.00 $4.25

Frequently Bought Together

Living through the Hoop: High School Basketball, Race, and the American Dream + Race Matters
Price for both: $76.17

Buy the selected items together
  • Race Matters $11.66

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 266 pages
  • Publisher: NYU Press (December 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0814757294
  • ISBN-13: 978-0814757291
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,555,501 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In his study of the soaring myths and ugly realities surrounding the world of high school basketball, May (Talking at Trena's) does the math: of the 530,000-odd high school basketball players this nation fielded in 2001, a mere 405 ever played professionally. This works out to a measly .001 probability—a fact that doesn't keep the kids he helps coach in a mostly black, poverty-stricken Georgia neighborhood from dreaming of the big time. More sociology paper than general interest book, May's work has the kind of on-the-ground raw material that most chroniclers of charged subjects (race, poverty, crime and social advancement) would dream of, yet he seems strangely unable to make much of it. After dividing his book into chapters on race, masculinity, sportsmanship and the like, May marches dutifully through each of them, reporting his findings with the utmost of care, never overstating something he doesn't have hard data for. Given literally a front-row seat to the arena where several of society's most potent stereotypes are played out, May retreats from the fray with his stiff, term-paper prose and cautious mien. However, May's commitment to these boys is clear, as he becomes convinced that even though their fantasies of living the American dream are for the most part a dirty trick, it still remains about the best thing going in their sadly limited lives. (Jan.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“May’s commitment to these boys is clear, as he becomes convinced that even though their fantasies of living the American dream are for the most part a dirty trick, it still remains about the best thing going in their sadly limited lives.”
-Publishers Weekly

,

“Much of what’s recounted here will surprise few; what leaps out is Living [through the Hoop]’s stark, confessional observations, its lengthy ruminations and the apparent lack of a fairy-tale postscript.”
-Detroit Metro Times

,

“A powerful and sober analysis of the lives of poor young people and coaches who sustain themselves with meaningful relationships and impossible dreams. May is an outstanding participant observer and interviewer who takes his reader into a social world, unpacks its meaning, and shows off the power of a vivid sociological imagination.”
-Mitchell Duneier,author of Sidewalk and Slim’s Table



“;Moving and memorable, Living Through the Hoop offers an unflinching account of black male ballplayers’ lives. Immersing himself in the lives of players on a high school basketball team, leading ethnographer May eloquently describes the impact of their hoop dreams. May's profound analysis shows basketball playing can often lead to success in not so flamboyant ways, as young men learn to avoid lures of mean streets, develop teamwork and fairness values, and counter omnipresent barriers of a racist society.”
-Joe R. Feagin,author of Systemic Racism



“May’s description of the experiences of these boys is readable and poignant; he describes the impact of drugs, alcohol, and violence on his players and also explores issues of masculinity and sportsmanship.”
-Choice

,

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By GA-boy on February 19, 2008
Format: Hardcover
May has an uncanny ability to immerse the reader in his intimate dealings with the subsets of society he studies. As a participant/observer in this high school basketball community, May is able to both pose and answer questions that the casual reader would never be privileged to embark upon alone. The end result of this work is to share a rare perspective of the struggles faced by the specific black youth of "Northeast" high school, and of the impact of social elements in the creation and attainment of life goals by youth in general. Great book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 3 people found the following review helpful By rachel duncan on May 7, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I didn't like the book,w as required to read it for class. Don't really have anything to say beyond that
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0xa6000828)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?