Qty:1
Add to Cart

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$38.39
+ $11.99 shipping
Sold by: Fun Stuff For Sale
Add to Cart
$42.99
+ $20.09 shipping
Sold by: BigKitchen
Add to Cart
$66.99
+ Free Shipping
Sold by: HeyitsDiane
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Lodge L8DD3 Double Dutch Oven and Casserole with Skillet Cover, 5-Quart
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Lodge L8DD3 Double Dutch Oven and Casserole with Skillet Cover, 5-Quart

by Lodge
| 35 answered questions

Price: $38.96 & FREE Shipping. Details
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
  • 5-quart pre-seasoned cast-iron Dutch oven and casserole with skillet cover
  • Sturdy, integrated side handles on base and lid for secure transport
  • 1-1/2-inch-deep domed lid doubles as a skillet
  • Hand washing recommended; oven-safe
  • Measures approximately 10-1/4 by 13 by 5-1/2 inches; lifetime warranty
11 new from $34.99 3 used from $34.71

Frequently Bought Together

Lodge L8DD3 Double Dutch Oven and Casserole with Skillet Cover, 5-Quart + Lodge L8DOT3 Pre-Seasoned Cast-Iron Meat Rack/Trivet, 8-inch + Lodge SCRAPERPK Durable Polycarbonate Pan Scrapers, Red and Black, 2-Pack
Price for all three: $55.44

Buy the selected items together


Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 12 x 12 x 5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S.
  • ASIN: B000LEXR0K
  • Item model number: L8DD3
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (540 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,656 in Kitchen & Dining (See Top 100 in Kitchen & Dining)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Product Description

Lodge Logic Double Dutch Oven and Casserole with Skillet Cover

Double Dutch Oven
Multi-functional Cookware

Every cook's dream: A 5-quart Dutch oven, with the lid easily converted to a 10 1/4-inch skillet. A natural for countless recipes, the Double Dutch will quickly become a favorite in your Lodge Cookware collection.

The Lodge Cast Iron Dutch Oven is a multi-functional cookware that works wonders with slow-cooking recipes. It comes with a tight-fitting lid that helps lock in nutrition and flavor. This pre-seasoned Dutch Oven works like a charm right out of the box. Made of cast iron, this Dutch Oven evenly distributes heat from the bottom through the sidewalls. Also, it retains heat better so your delicious meal remains warm for a long time. Sporting a stylish black color, the cast iron Dutch Oven looks good in most kitchens and it doubles up as an excellent source of nutritional iron. It features loop handles for convenient handling and the oven is easy to clean and maintain.

A simple Cast-Iron Dutch Oven, like the one your grandmother used, still ranks as one of the best cooking utensils ever made. It gives you a nearly non-stick surface, without the possible harmful fumes generated by preheating chemically treated nonstick cookware.

Many of the pieces of cast iron cookware made in the Lodge Foundry over a century ago remain in use today

Double Dutch Oven
Lid Converts to a Skillet

Features:

  • Made of cast iron
  • Assist handles for easier handling
  • Pre-seasoned and ready-to-use
  • Multi-functional cookware
  • Virtual Non-stick surface
  • Works with induction stove tops
  • Brutally tough for decades of cooking

Detailed Highlights:

Multi-Functional Cookware

The right tool for searing, sauteing, simmering, braising, baking, roasting, and frying.

Made of Cast-Iron

Cast-Iron is a form of cookware developed over a millennia ago remains as popular today as when it was used to prepare meals hundreds of years ago. Cast Iron is one of only two metals compatible with induction stovetops. Unparalleled in heat retention and even heating.

Can Be Used With A Variety of Heat Sources

At home in the oven, on the stove, on the grill or over the campfire. Skillet may be used on various heat sources including gas, electric, induction and ceramic-glass top stoves and ovens. When using on glass stove tops, be careful not to slide the cookware around as it's possible to scratch the surface. Seasoned cast iron can also be used on the grill or outdoor fire and coals for camp cooking. Begin heating cookware on low and slowly bring heat up to medium or medium/high. Always remove cookware from the stovetop after cooking.

Pre-Seasoned

Seasoned for a natural, easy-release finish that improves with use.

Seasoning is a necessary step in using cast iron cookware. Oil is baked into the pores of the iron at the foundry to prevent rusting and to eventually provide a natural, non-stick cooking surface. Unlike synthetically coated cookware, it is possible to restore the cooking surface of cast iron.

Lodge uses a proprietary soy-based vegetable oil to season our cookware. The oil contains no animal fat or peanut oil. The seasoning is functional application and slight inconsistencies may appear in the seasoning finish. The inconsistencies will not affect cooking performance.

Easy to Care for

Hand wash, dry, rub with cooking oil. It is very important to replenish the seasoning of your cast iron cookware by applying a thin layer of oil after each cleaning. Seasoning is an on-going process. The more you use cast iron, the seasoning is improved.

Double Dutch Oven
Using Your Lodge Cast Iron

Rinse with hot water (do not use soap), and dry thoroughly.

Before cooking, apply vegetable oil to the cooking surface of your pan and pre-heat the pan slowly (always start on low heat, increasing the temperature slowly).

Once the utensil is properly pre-heated, you are ready to cook.

TIP: Avoid cooking very cold food in the pan, as this can promote sticking.

PLEASE REMEMBER: Handles will become very hot in the oven, and on the stovetop. Always use an oven mitt to prevent burns when removing pans from oven or stovetop.

Care and Cleaning of your Lodge Cast Iron

After cooking, clean utensil with a stiff nylon brush and hot water. Using soap is not recommended, and harsh detergents should never be used. (Avoid putting a hot utensil into cold water. Thermal shock can occur causing the metal to warp or crack).

If you are having trouble removing stuck-on food, boil some water in your pan for a few minutes to loosen residue, making it easier to remove.

Towel dry immediately and apply a light coating of oil to the utensil while it is still warm.

TIP: Do not let your cast iron air dry, as this can promote rust.

Store in a cool, dry place. If you have a cover, or lid, for your utensil, place a folded paper towel in between lid and utensil allowing air to circulate. This prevents moisture from collecting inside the utensil, which can cause rust.

TIP: The oven is a great place to store your cast iron; just remember to remove it before turning on the oven.

NEVER wash in dishwasher.

If for some reason your utensil develops a metallic smell or taste, or perhaps rust spots (maybe a well-meaning relative washed your utensil in the dishwasher or with soap thinking they were being helpful), never fear. Simply scour off the rust using a very fine grade of sandpaper or steel wool and refer to our section on re-seasoning.

Re-Seasoning your Lodge Cast Iron

While maintaining the seasoning should keep your Cast Iron in good condition, at some point you may need to repeat the seasoning process. If food sticks to the surface, or you notice a dull, gray color, repeat the seasoning process:

Wash the cookware with hot, soapy water and a stiff brush. (It is okay to use soap this time because you are preparing to re-season the cookware).

Rinse and dry completely. Apply a thin, even coating of MELTED solid vegetable shortening (or cooking oil of your choice) to the cookware (inside and out).

Place aluminum foil on the bottom rack of the oven to catch any dripping.

Set oven temperature to 350 � 400 degrees F.

Place cookware upside down on the top rack of the oven.

Bake the cookware for at least one hour. After the hour, turn the oven off and let the cookware cool in the oven.

Store the cookware uncovered, in a dry place when cooled.

Why should I choose Lodge cookware over other brands?

For over 112 years, Lodge has provided quality cast iron cookware and accessories, with a broad and innovative assortment. Our continued commitment to quality enables Lodge to offer a superior product line.

How is the diameter measurement of Lodge Cookware determined?

We measure from outside rim to outside rim across the top of the cookware, not the bottom.

What type utensils are recommended to be used with Lodge products?

We recommend using wood or silicone utensils to avoid scratching.

Why should soap or detergent not be used to clean cast iron cookware?

Soap and detergent are used to break down and remove oils. Since the seasoning of your cast iron consists of oil, cleaning with soap will strip or remove the seasoning from cookware.

Are there any types of food that are not recommended to be cooked in cast iron cookware?

Foods which are very acidic (i.e. beans, tomatoes, citrus juices, etc.) should not be cooked in a cast iron utensil until the cookware is highly seasoned. The high acidity of these foods will strip the seasoning and result in discoloration and metallic tasting food. Wait until cast iron is better seasoned to cook these types of foods.

Lodge is a Green Foundry:

Lodge is a zero hazardous waste stream foundry. Lodge designed a vegetable oil recycler for the seasoning process to reduce waste and unusable oil is recycled and used as biodiesel generator. Lodge uses recycled and biodegradable packing materials. Reuse of foundry sand used in the casting process is recycled and unusable sand, working to purify the water of the local streams and planting trees to improve air quality and beautification.

Lodge History:

Lodge is the oldest family-owned cookware foundry in America. Since 1896, the Lodge family has been casting premium iron cookware at their Tennessee foundry. Starting with raw materials and finishing with their seasoning process, they continue to improve on the highest quality standards that go into every piece we make. As the sole American manufacturer of cast iron cookware, they are proud to carry on the legacy started by founder Joseph Lodge. Lodge doesn't just make cast iron; they make heirlooms that bring people together for generations.


Important Information

Ingredients
Double Dutch oven


Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

The casserole is a domed lid, fits like a glove meshing with the pot handles.
Jane Eyre
So far I've used the oven to make beef stew, pot roast, pork butt roast and green chili; everything turned out great.
Abe Froman
You really need to give it a good seasoning before you first use it - otherwise you can expect it to stick and rust.
Nasios

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

493 of 499 people found the following review helpful By Joe MacBu on August 25, 2008
Verified Purchase
I have been cooking with Lodge cast iron for about 7 years and own 8 pieces from their inventory. The Double Dutch Oven is my favorite Lodge cookware due to its versatility.

When using a dutch oven, I usually sear the meat first to add flavor. Usually, this requires searing the meat in several batches. The best part about the Double Dutch is that you can sear the meat in the big pot and in the lid simultaneously, thus reducing the time needed to brown the meat by half. Since the lid is then used for the braising step (after deglazing), you're not increasing the number of items to be cleaned later.

I like the lid so much that I often use it by itself for pan frying. Due to the smallish size (about 10 inches in diameter) and the inherent properties of cast iron, the lid can get incredibly hot if you want it to. Perfect for cooking a steak (it puts on a better crust vs my 12" Lodge skillet). I've even used it as a pie pan in a pinch. When properly seasoned, the lid also works great for cooking eggs without them sticking. A seasoned cast iron pan is the original nonstick and will outlast any synthetic-coated nonstick pan in the market (and without the toxic fumes).

When used as a Dutch Oven, it works like it should. It retains heat well and cooks evenly. There is very little steam that escapes. The smaller 5qt capacity (vs a 7qt Dutch Oven, which I use less now that I've got this one) is also better for cooking moderate amounts of food. Generally, you want little empty space when using a Dutch oven.

In response to the reviewer who has problems getting the lid off, I suggest the following. When setting the lid on the pot, don't align the handles of the two. This will allow you to remove the lid easily, without having to worry about injuries.
Read more ›
29 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
242 of 250 people found the following review helpful By Locavore181 on February 7, 2010
Verified Purchase
The use of the Dutch oven has recently been reborn with just about every Food Network Chef/star touting their very own product version. During the holidays a good friend purchased a beautiful royal blue Le Crueset from William Sonoma and recently served us a wonderful roast beef and veggie dinner. The meat was flavorful and rich, cooked to perfection and had complexity in flavor, much more so that the same recipe cooked in a crock pot (which often leaves everything in the pot tasting the same).

As a wanna-be homesteader, in-training, I immediately decided I must have a Dutch Oven... I went straight to William Sonoma's site, credit card in hand, and stopped dead when I saw the price tag of the Le Creuset of $250.00+. As a bargain shopper who aims for product knowledge then sensible purchases, I set out to research my options to determine if a good dutch oven warranted such a heft price tag. I explored the Kitchen Aid, Le Creuset, Mario Batali, Calphalon, Lodge, Rachel Ray, Paula Dean and many others. All have varying price points and gorgeous enamel finish colors and sizes. What to do? Should I spend the $250 for the Le Creuset. Would my food taste that much better than the more economically priced Rachel Ray oven? 100+ product reviews later and I was on product information overload and still totally undecided.

So here do you go when you need to know? The social networking sites, of course! I posted the question "Considering purchasing a Dutch oven, reviews, recommendations and feedback please!" Within the hour I began to receive a live stream of reviews from friends, family and associates. I asked questions like Enamel or Cast Iron? Which size oven works best for your family? Are they easy to care for? How often do you use it?
Read more ›
10 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
243 of 255 people found the following review helpful By Kiki on November 20, 2009
Verified Purchase
To preface, I'm trying really hard to be a "good cook" but don't have a lot of experience, and I can't justify spending thousands of dollars on a budding hobby. So, when it came to replacing my flaking non-stick cookware, I researched for months before deciding on a hybrid set of copper-core stainless and Lodge cast iron. I read dozens of reviews and was intimidated by the extra care required by cast iron (I'm a wash-and-wear type). But, Lodge is so cheap comparatively and still really respected as an industry standard, that it's hard to overlook.

I initially purchased the combo cooker, a 5qt dutch oven, and a variety of skillets. The cookers arrived in their Lodge packaging and were quite secure, but the skillets definitely were shipped loose. Fortunately they survived the jumbled journey fine, but I can see what other reviewers suffered with regards to skillets scraping each other or breaking out of their boxes - they are only a few steps shy of being insufficiently packaged. Free shipping is a great offer though.

The pieces were just what I expected after having read the reviews - heavy, uneven in color/preseasoning application, and rough like sandpaper. Several reviewers I read were upset by sticking of initial cooking attempts, specifically because of the cat's tongue-like feel of the basin surface (which Lodge's website says is a normal condition). Responders suggested a few home seasonings prior to cooking, but I was impatient and followed one piece of advice spefically: go to my local bulk goods store, buy ten pounds of ground beef, and cook it in my new cast iron. I ended up also getting four pounds of bacon for good measure, and spent three hours cooking batch after batch of ground beef and bacon in every piece I'd purchased.
Read more ›
8 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

See the Top Rated cookware in our Cookware Reviews.