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Questions & Answers
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Showing 1-10 of 46 questions
1
vote
Maybe try seasons after every wash... I do and don't have any problems...
Feb 7, 2014 by Court
1
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It is not hard to take care of the cast iron. I wash it with hot water after each cooking, pat dry with a towel (be sure it is really dry), put a drop or two of oil on my palm and spread the oil all over the pan inside, outside, and the handle. Do not use a lot of oil. If you feel a lot of oil, then use a paper towel or a napkin and pat the excess oil. That's it. It is ready for the next cooking time. You do not need much oil to cook the next time either. If you have some food stuck on the bottom, never soak the pan, just scab/ scrape with anything on hand; wash, dry, and season with oil. If you have more question I will be glad to answer them.
Jan 16, 2014 by Valkow
1
vote
Of course it's okay. Butter makes everything better. Just remember to immediately rinse out skillet, wipe with paper towel (or something) and dry over the still warm burner .
Mar 11, 2013 by nancy minyon
1
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The base is about 6.5 inches, so I'd recommend getting a bigger skillet.
Nov 21, 2013 by Josh Bittinger
0
votes
could be a few things... all new cast iron pans come pre-seasoned. That is you need to continually oil the pan after use (basically take about a nickel sized drop of canola oil and paper towel and wipe entire pan after cleaning before storing for next use, ensuring to wipe off excess). The pan comes with an oil already on it. There are instructions on the web site from manufacturer on how to initialize the pan. They include a process of putting the pan in the oven for approx. 20 minutes at 450 degrees or so ( you can look it up). Over time and use the pan will inherit its own unique seasoning which most chefs find pleasing and subtle. In addition, if you have not utilized cast iron for cooking there can be a short learning curve. Unlike other pans when cooking things that require a lot of oil, such as fried chicken, the pan definitely needs more time with said oil to heat up before placing the chicken into it. I don't know if this is or is not the process that you followed, but if the chicken went in prior to the oil both heating to a high temp and sustaining that temp there is a good chance that the way the chicken cooked initially ( at a lower temperature) could have resulted in the taste that you describe. My suggestion would be to a) season and break in the pan as described on web site, b) cook in the pan a few times and clean/season afterward as described , c) finally give the fried chicken another shot waiting for the oil to heat up to a very high temp and sustain the temp before initiating the cooking. I believe you will be rewarded. Once you get used to skillet cooking for certain things (like fried chicken) you won't look back. Hope that helps.
May 1, 2013 by B
0
votes
The measurement of this pan 10 3/4 is from the top, from spout to spout The bottom of the pan measures 8 3/4 across, I just measured mine to respond to this question
Dec 29, 2013 by Jan
0
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My Lodge skillet label (and 5 other Lodge cast iron cookware) state made in US. If you visit Lodge manufacturing website will see only their Porcelain Enameled Cookware is imported from China.
Feb 22, 2013 by Mentat
0
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I have trouble with my hands holding heavy objects. The L5SK3 skillet (8" across the top with one handle as pictured) weighs 1500 grams on my gram scale which converts to 3 pounds and 5 oz rounded off. The 10 1/2" skillet with 2 handles which also serves as the lid of the deep fryer weighs 2850 grams which converts to 6 pounds and 5 ounces rounded off. I can handle the 8" skillet with one hand, but have to use both hands for the 10 1/2" skillet.
Feb 19, 2014 by Grangie
0
votes
If you don't use your iron skillet for anything else, at least use it for cooking cornbread in the oven. Cornbread and cast iron were made for each other. Put all the oil called for in the skillet, NOT in the mix. Heat the pan with the oil in the oven at 425 to 450. When the oil is very hot, smoking hot, pour the hot oil into the cornbread mix. Combine it well and pour the mix into the skillet. Replace in the oven. In 20 to 25 minutes when the top of the cornbread is brown and cracked, remove, cut and serve hot topped with butter, soupy black eyed peas, diced raw onion and shredded chedder cheese or sour cream. A little tobasco sauce sprinkled on the top also adds to it. Now to answer your question: You can't get a standard kitchen oven hot enough to damage cast iron. A good pair of oven gloves is better than the handle cover. Handling the heavy, hot cast iron is better done with 2 hands. Do not under any circumstances allow cold or even cool water in your hot cast iron. The iron will crack and break.
Jul 9, 2014 by Amazon Customer
0
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The 8" is a perfect size for one bag of cornbread mix or one box of jiffy cornbread mix. That is one of the reasons I bought it too. :)
Jan 23, 2014 by Carla M.
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