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Lodge Pro-Logic P7A3 Cast-Iron Aebleskiver Pan

by Lodge
4.7 out of 5 stars 241 customer reviews
| 24 answered questions

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  • Cast-iron aebleskiver pan with 7 slots for creating Danish pancake balls
  • Preseasoned with vegetable oil formula and ready for immediate use
  • Cast-iron surface heats slowly and evenly to prevent burning
  • Nonstick, rustproof finish cleans easily; hand wash only
  • Includes long handle and opposite helper handle; lifetime warranty
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Product Description

The classic Danish Cake Pan, the Lodge Aebleskiver is used to prepare Danish pancake Balls, pastries filled with fruit and even Oysters Rockefeller. Aebleskiver, which means "Sliced Apples" in Danish, is excellent for making pastries. Considered a specialty bakeware item, the little round cups are filled with dough and as it starts cooking, the chef uses a little wooden stick to "flip" it into a little ball which can then be filled with fruit, such as sliced apples. It has a 9" diameter and is 16 5/8" long. The impressions are 3 1/4" in diameter and 1" deep. Cast iron loves a campfire, a stovetop, or an oven, and can slow-cook foods without scorching. It retains heat well so you can sear meat at higher temperatures and will keep your delicious meals warm for a long time. Whether used in a kitchen or camp, theses virtually indestructible cookware should last for generations. Made of cast iron, this Skillet evenly distributes heat from the bottom through the sidewalls. Sporting a stylish black color, the cast iron Skillet looks good in most kitchens and it doubles up as an excellent source of nutritional iron. Cast Iron, like your grandmother used, still ranks as one of the best cooking utensils ever made. It gives you a nearly non-stick surface, without the possible harmful fumes generated by preheating chemically treated nonstick cookware. The American-based company, Lodge, has been fine-tuning its construction of rugged, cast-iron cookware for more than a century.

Product Information

Product Dimensions 16.1 x 9.2 x 2.1 inches
Item Weight 5.6 pounds
Shipping Weight 5.6 pounds
Manufacturer Lodge
ASIN B00063RXQA
Item model number P7A3
Customer Reviews
4.7 out of 5 stars 241 customer reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Best Sellers Rank #83,578 in Home & Kitchen (See Top 100 in Home & Kitchen)
#355 in Kitchen & Dining > Cookware > Specialty Cookware
#2,083 in Kitchen & Dining > Cookware > All Pans
Date first available at Amazon.com October 2, 2001

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Product Warranty: For warranty information about this product, please click here

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Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Verified Purchase
I've been cooking aebleskivers for several years in an excellent no-name cast iron pan that I bought in Solvang ten years ago. It is very well broken in with a smooth non-stick patina in all seven indents. I want to teach my sons how to cook aebleskivers themselves because they will be out on their own soon, and it never hurts to be able to attract a woman who loves Danish delicacies!

Therefore, I have been looking to buy some additional aebleskiver pans and I was excited to see this new pan from Lodge, so I ordered one to give it a try. I like the design a lot and am impressed with how it heats up quickly and holds it's temperature nicely. The first batch of aebleskivers had some sticking, but I expected that. I will need to use it a lot more before it has the same non-stick surfaces as my old pan (no, it's not for sale!), but I can tell that this pan will get there with use.

By the way, I've found that there are many recipes for aebleskivers and several different techniques for cooking them. I'm sure that they all will work well with some practice, but I'll describe the one that I've settled on, because it is so easy:

Heat the pan at a medium-low setting. Take about two cups of prepared pancake mix (I use Krusteaz Buttermilk) and add a couple of teaspoons of sugar. Mix it in and stir in enough cold water to make the consistency about the same as you would for drop bisquits. Don't overmix it and let it sit for awhile to rise a bit before you cook it. Put a little butter or margerine in each indent and add about a teaspoonful of batter to each indent (If you're new to aebleskivers, I recommend trying only three at once.) I then drizzle a little butter on the edges of each indent.
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Verified Purchase
The pre-seasoning of this pan really does work! It gives you about a year or two head start on the seasoning. My first use, I just brushed the wells of the hot pan with butter and put the batter in. No sticking at all. The price on Amazon is great, too!
Ingredients
○ 2 cups all-purpose flour
○ 1 teaspoon kosher salt
○ 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
○ 2 eggs, separated
○ 1 3/4 cups buttermilk
○ 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted (more melted butter to brush in the pan)
○ cardamom or cinnamon to taste (optional)
Directions
a. Put the aebleskiver pan on a medium-to-high heat.
b. Whisk the dry ingredients together. Whisk the egg yolks with the buttermilk and melted butter in a separate bowl.
c. Beat the egg whites until they just hold a 2-inch peak. (don't over beat.)
d. Add the liquid buttermilk-butter-yolk mixture to the dry ingredients in a slow, steady stream while gently mixing with a rubber spatula. You should still have large patches of dry ingredients by the time you finish, this is more wetting of the batter than mixing.
e. Fold in the egg whites, again with a light touch.
f. Brush one of the hollows with some melted butter. Then take a small ladle or big spoon and fill the hollow not-quite-to-the-top with batter. Depending on how hot your pan is, you may need to add batter quickly so the butter doesn't hit its smoke point. Fill the other hollows the same way.
g. By the time you've finished filling the last hollow, the first one should be just about ready for turning. Take your knitting needle (or wooden skewer) poke it into the crust with your poker and pull upward. The idea is to pull the semi-spherical shell up out of the hollow.
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This Aebleskiver pan does double duty in our house. First, of course, it does wonderful aebleskivers. However, I do not make them all of the time but I do make muffins quite often so the pan also serves as a little muffin pan. The pan will hold one package of muffin mix like a Martha White and it will get you seven nice little golden-crusted muffins. My son calls what comes out "cute little mushroom muffins." I am tempted to get a real cast-iron muffin pan because this one does so well.
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I'm a big foodie, yet I've never had an aebleskiver before. But they looked like a fun, tasty item to make, so when my wife asked if I wanted anything to help her get free shipping, I had her add one of these pans on while it was on sale.

It arrived with basically no instructions, so I went off to the internet for recipes, all of which required ingredients I didn't have. So I noticed that someone had used a Krusteaz pancake mix with a little sugar added...so I decided to wing it.

I rinsed the pan with hot water and scrubbed it a bit (the pan is pre-seasoned with a pretty good coating already), put it on an electric burner to preheat for a bit (it looks like it would work better on a gas stove, but with some preheating time, electric works just fine), added about a teaspoon of oil to each divet, and added some Krusteaz mixture. The first three were pretty much a disaster leaving little chunks behind in the pan. For some reason (more preheating? a little more oil?) the next batch came out better, and the final batch of 3 or 4 came out in perfectly shaped little balls. And EXTREMELY tasty. The pan cleaned up easily, and I've made at least one batch every day since (however I'm almost out of mix now!).
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