Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Logical Properties: Identity, Existence, Predication, Necessity, Truth 1st Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0199241811
ISBN-10: 0199241813
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$19.99 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$100.00 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
18 New from $35.95 10 Used from $19.99
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Save Up to 90% on Textbooks Textbooks
$100.00 FREE Shipping. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Editorial Reviews

Review


"...a technical work in philosophical logic, not in the sense that it is strewn with technical symbols and formal logic. It takes up and discusses topics in a sophisticated way suitable for those working in the area and is not intended primarily for novices in the subject. Having said that, it is well written and clear so that there is much that would be rewarding to non-specialists who wish to come to the subject. There is much in the way of close and interesting argumentation." -- The Review of Metaphysics


About the Author


Colin McGinn is Professor of Philosophy at Rutgers University, New York.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Hardcover: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Clarendon Press; 1 edition (January 11, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199241813
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199241811
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 0.7 x 5.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.7 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,266,414 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
In this book Prof. McGinn gives an extremely concise tractation of the five basic concepts of identity, existence, predication, necessity and truth. Each concept corresponds to a chapter, in which McGinn, after briefly delineating an "orthodox view", proceeds to describe his personal theories. The book is well written and easy to follow. Some of the points raised by McGinn are of outstanding interest, others are not impressive at all. By putting so much emphasis on his personal views, the author reduces to the minimum his dialogue with famous philosophers and this results in some cases in a not very complete dissertation. Although the book is interesting, I think it offers itself to a narrow audience, not because it is too specialistic, but because it does not contain extensive introductions to each topic.
Comment 6 of 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Mark Twain on February 8, 2001
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In this exquisite little book, philosopher McGinn explores fundamental notions of logic and clears away the mist surrounding these notions. Identity is primitive and undefinable; existence is a predicate (!), predicates are more like singular terms than names (!), and "truth" really means something and is not redundant (!). This small text is of particular interest to those interested in analytic philosophy. It's radical and written with extraordinary clarity. Not that it doesn't have parts that can be attacked (what doesn't?), but it is a refreshing re-examination of important logical properties.
Comment 3 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This book is an excellent primer on the topic of what McGinn calls logical properties. He has organized chapters on identity, existence, predication, necessity, and truth. I highly recommend this text as well as others: Kripke: Naming and Necessity; Quine: Philosophy of Logic, Methods of Logic; Forbes: Metaphysics of Modality; Salmon: Reference and Essence, Frege's Puzzle.
This text is a decent overview of these topics, eps. on Frege, Russell, and Kripke. The most interesting chs. are on necessity and existence (Soames is the authority on truth).
McGinn argues in favor of existence in terms of a first-order predicate (as opposed to quantificational paraphrase) and rejects identity in strictly quantifiable terms (via Leibniz's law). He sees identity as a primitive relation expressed by a 2-place predicate, which is his take off stance on necessity (possible worlds). At bottom, McGinn rejects a philosopher's 'infatuation' with expressions of modality as strictly quantificational. One may find interest in his arguments for such a rejection.
1 Comment 8 of 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Colin McGinn excels as both a writing stylist and lucid thinker. Logical Properties is a brief text in which McGinn re-visits topics that dominated his thinking in the 70s and 80s. The new perspective he brings to these topics (namely, Identity, Existence, Predication, Necessity, and Truth - of course)after venturing off into other areas of philosophy makes this book particularly enlightening.
Caution: it is not for an audience unfamiliar with college level philosophy, but neither is it exceedingly complex.
I place McGinn up there with Hume as a stylist and philosopher.
Comment 5 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse