Logorrhea: Good Words Make Good Stories and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$11.16
Qty:1
  • List Price: $13.00
  • Save: $1.84 (14%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Logorrhea: Good Words Make Good Stories (Bantam Spectra Book) Paperback – May 1, 2007


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.16
$6.59 $0.01
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Series: Bantam Spectra Book
  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Spectra (May 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553384333
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553384338
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,637,348 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Capitalizing on the current spelling-bee craze, this anthology presents commissions inspired by winning words from the Scripps National Spelling Bee, thereby providing those unfamiliar with either spellings or definitions of the likes of vivisepulture, insouciant, and eudaemonic delightful opportunities to learn them. Librarian and sf zine editor Klima has corraled 21 authors, speculative-fiction luminaries ranging from Liz Williams and Michael Moorcock to Elizabeth Hand and Jay Lake. In the opening tale, "The Chiaroscurist," a painter specializing in the interplay of light and shadow shoulders an unexpected burden when he hires a gnome to model God's likeness for a planned fresco. "Logorrhea" explores the unusual relationship between a woman afflicted with compulsive verbosity and a man whose lizardlike exterior brings out her listening talents. Other entries revolve around the skin conditions eczema and psoriasis, recount the fate of a foreign-exchange expert, or cambist, and more. A treat for dictionary hounds and vocabulary-challenged word lovers everywhere. Carl Hays
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

"This book is a logophile's dream—a left-field collection of stories inspired by winning words from the Scripps National Spelling Bee. Anyone who has ever spent an hour or two happily browsing the pages of a dictionary will find something to love here."—Kevin Brockmeier, author of A Brief History of the Dead

"Delightful.... A treat for dictionary hounds and vocabulary-challenged word lovers everywhere."—Booklist

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Strawn on June 15, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The conceit of this collection of short stories is that a group of authors were invited to choose a word that had been the winning word from one of the annual Scripps National Spelling Bee competitions. The word Logorrhea itself was the winning word of the 1999 spelling bee that was featured in the film Spellbound. Logorrhea means "pathologically incoherent, repetitious speech," which is not an accurate descprition of this book. In a moment I'll give a brief review of each story, but overall the book is excellent. The stories span a wide variety of genres, although most lend themselves to a kind of magical realism or even fantasy & science fiction. There are very few that don't involve some sort of supernatural element, although a disturbing number involve grotesque bodily conditions, especially skin conditions. I could have used fewer descriptions of bodies breaking apart in ways that involve lots of pussy fluid, but there are plenty others that avoid the gross-out descriptions. At least one of these is award nominated, and some of the others are also effecting enough to stay with you long after you put the book down, even without resorting to turning your stomach. The one funny bit that I found is that 7 of the 21 words chosen are all from the last 10 years of the spelling bee. In spite of all the rhetoric that is logorrhically repeated about American students getting dumber, these words are hard. Much harder than, say, 1930's winning word of "knack." Not exactly a brain-buster there.

"The Chiaroscurist" by Hal Duncan: a wonderful short about a painter who works with light, contrast and shadow(hence the use of "chiaroscuro").
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The lead story is fricking awesome! The controlled prose, the beauty of the language and the denouement at the end. That alone is worth the price of the book. But they're all awesome and John Klima has done a wonderful job w tis collection.

Sorry, I hate writing longe reviews, but this will have to do.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search