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Lomography Horizon Perfekt Panoramic 35mm Film Camera

4 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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  • Yields amazing 120-degree panoramic shots
  • Multi-coated Arsat 28/2.8 glass for great color, contrast, and sharpness
  • Aperature range of f2.8 to f16
  • Shutter speed ranges from 1/500 second to 1/2 second
  • Operates without any batteries
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Product Description

Product Description

Product Description The heavyweight champ and undisputed professional choice. Clad in high-impact and undeniably sexy ABS plastic, the Perfekt features a full range of aperture and shutter settings--allowing you to dial in the precise exposure every time. Advanced clockwork mechanics provide whisper-quiet lens sweep and a host of handy built-in accessories allow you to capture any scene on YOUR terms.

From the Manufacturer

From the Manufacturer The heavyweight champ and undisputed professional choice. Clad in high-impact and undeniably sexy ABS plastic, the Perfekt features a full range of aperture and shutter settings--allowing you to dial in the precise exposure every time. Advanced clockwork mechanics provide whisper-quiet lens sweep and a host of handy built-in accessories allow you to capture any scene on YOUR terms.

Features
If the Horizon's 60 year looks like ancient history to you young'uns, then I have some more news for you--panoramic photography as an art has been around for over 150 years The Panorama aficionados around the world owe a collective danke to Austria's own Joseph Puchberger, who patented a hand-cranked panoramic camera consisting of successive Daguerreotype plates. The resulting image yielded an amazing 120 degrees of vision. Taken at its most basic functions, not a whole lot has changed in panoramic photography since Herr Puchberger's days. It goes to show--the best ideas can truly stand the test of time.

Photo taken with the Lomo Horizon Perfekt
Multicoated Arsat 28/2.8 Glass Lens
This crispy glass heart of the Horizon is just as lovely as it sounds: a multi-element masterpiece that yields eye-popping color, jaw-dropping contrast, and slamming sharpness all around.

Swing-Lens Technology
Cocking the Horizon's shutter charges its clockwork mechanics, and touching the shutter release sets the lens into motion. As the lens swings from side to side, a narrow vertical slit between the lens and film rotates along with it--thereby progressively exposing the film as the lens moves. The film plane is curved, thereby keeping the film tight and maintaining a uniform distance from the lens.

Photo taken with the Lomo Horizon Perfekt
Whisper-Quiet Clockwork Mechanics
If you've ever shot the old-school Horizon 202, then you may have heard its buzzy "little engine that could" clockwork engine each time a long exposure was selected. If that sound charmed your heart, then you're in for a disappointment with the Perfekt, as its motor is silky smooth and dead-quiet. That yields subtle operation when you need it--such as in museums, graduation ceremonies, poetry slams, funerals, and chicken mummification rituals.

Variable Aperture Settings
From a wide open f2.8 to a teensy-tiny f16, you can dial in your precise aperture setting to get the optimum exposure for each shot. On the flip side, you can also control the depth of field for your own creative uses. Choose a large aperture (f2.8) for a crispy subject against a somewhat blurred background. Nice for portraits, that is. Or, choose a small aperture (f11 or f16) for razor-sharpness from front to back.

Photo taken with the Lomo Horizon Perfekt
Variable Shutter Settings
A blazing 1/500sec top shutter speed gets you high-speed freezes on the brightest days of the year. A shhhh-looowww ½ second brings partially-lit nights and gloomy indoors into full, glowing brilliance. And all the settings in between (1/250, 1/125. 1/60, 1/8, 1/4) are just perfect for light conditions that are...in between.

Built-In Pro Accessories
These little touches make your Perfekt an absolute joy. The tripod thread and cable release thread, when used together, give you the most perfect shake-free long exposures that folks have ever seen. The bubble-eye level, available through the viewfinder, allows you to perfectly place the "horizon" of each photograph. And the fat handgrip gives you a slow-steady hand for those low-light situations when a tripod just ain't proper.

Battery-Free Operation
Everything that your Horizon does, from the shutter firing to that little lens moving left to right, is powered by a classic clockwork motor. If you and a buddy trek to Outer Mongolia, and his megapixel machine kicks the bucket for lack of power, then you'll be able to fill the empty slots of his travel album with your unending Horizon snaps!

Uses All Varieties of 35mm Film
That's right--all the 35mm color negative, black and white, slide, infrared, ultraviolet, and film that you haven't even heard of can be loaded into your Horizon's greedy little gullet.

Two-Year Limited Warranty
The Lomographic Society International guarantees your Horizon to be free of manufacturer defects for two full years after purchase. This does not include misuse, abuse, or dropping your camera into the Ganges.

What's in the Box
Horizon Perfekt camera, faux leather carrying case, Horizon book (132 pages), original Russian packaging box, Horizon poster, carrying belt, and handgrip.


Product Details

  • Shipping Weight: 5.3 pounds
  • ASIN: B000CC5F8I
  • Item model number: 951
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #56,237 in Camera & Photo (See Top 100 in Camera & Photo)
  • Product Warranty: For warranty information about this product, please click here
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: November 14, 2005

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Verified Purchase
Well made and easy to use. The shutter speed and aperture ranges allow total flexability in exposure settings. The film image size fits in a 2 1/4 enlarger film holder. The included camera handle is unecessary if attention is payed to holding the fingers at the edge if the camera. A real bargain besides.
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Verified Purchase
I couldn't afford to spend $1,500 for a used Widelux F7 or F8 in excellent condition, so I decided on a new Horizon Perfekt. I reached this decision after looking at a number of Horizon images on Flickr and elsewhere that really impressed me.

I had originally hesitated in buying a Horizon because I'd heard its body is made of plastic. The interior mechanism, however, appears to be largely metallic. In addition, the plastic body doesn't feel all that bad; its textured surface is easy to grasp. I've had the camera for several days now and, based on the first few rolls of film I've shot, I'm extremely happy with this purchase. Once you get the hang of it, loading the camera is pretty easy -- and as long as you follow the instructions, the Horizon is straightforward and almost easy to use. I especially liked being able to see the spirit level in the viewfinder.

I was slightly disappointed with the film chamber door, which feels even more plasticky to me than the rest of the camera body, but it's really no worse than doors on many other film cameras, so I'm not worrying about it.

I'm able to scan the Horizon Perfekt's 24x58mm frames using a CanoScan 8800F.

Included with the Horizon Perfekt is a set of filters that look incredibly twitchy to use, a detachable handle for the camera, a Lomography book featuring Horizon photos, and a camera case.
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Low tech as all get-out (no light meter, no focus, manual film advance. etc.) But this is really an extraordinary camera, especially for the price.

You can get some really nice panoramic (wide screen) effects with the panoramic stitching software on most digital cameras. But I don't think it matches the true panoramic effect you get with this camera.

The lens rotates and the film plane behind the lens has an equivalent curvature so that you get the "true" panoramic effect, not just widescreen. The camera uses 35 mm film but creates a negative that's the length of a 2 1/4" x 2 1/4" negative.

It takes a little trial and error to learn what types of shots will work and what won't. But once you get the hang of it you will get some really neat effects.

I've done a lot of things to trim down my photo bag when I travel, like leaving the telephoto lens and external flash at home. But I still take this camera. On most trips I only use it for a handful of subjects (only three times on my recent trip to France), but to me it's still worth the extra weight to have this camera for the right shot.
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Verified Purchase
I just got the camera today.
The camera itself works well, I am shooting my first roll of film. I will add more to this review when I get the film developed.

The leather case that comes with the camera was moldy. Quite moldy. This is pretty disappointing given that I paid almost $500 for this thing. I cleaned it with 70% ethanol and hopefully the mold will not come back. I would have sent it back, but you can't send only the case back. And I do love this beast of a camera.
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Do a web search and learn that "lomography" is/was basically cheap stuff producing cheap looking results that are then proclaimed and marketed to have an artistic value. "in 1991, the Austrian founders of Lomography discovered the Lomo LC-A.[1] They were "charmed by the unique, colorful, and sometimes blurry" images that the camera produced." [...]

If stellar results are not what you are after then proceed to purchase if you wish. Keep in mind marketing toots it's own horn. I owned a Noblex panoramic and found it to be a pain in the rear. It was not versatile and required perfect leveling to yield results that were not obviously curved. The subject matter is also of great importance and hard to obtain. I now use digital and software for panos and for the price of one of these cameras I can get a used computer, camera and software. Would be helpful to straighten out all the distortion theses cameras produce. But the result is on film so no help there.

I just thought I would throw a few cautions out there but if the negatives do not prevent you then go for it.
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