Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.95
  • Save: $3.63 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The Loneliness of the Lon... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Shipped from Amazon! Softcover book with clean tight pages. Binding is tight and square, No writing on text. Buy with confidence from this reliable seller with no hassle returns! Amazon Prime Members get FREE Shipping!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner (Vintage International) Paperback – March 2, 2010

3.7 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

See all 29 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.32
$6.46 $1.49

2016 Book Awards
Browse award-winning titles. See all 2016 winners
$11.32 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner (Vintage International)
  • +
  • Poverty Creek Journal (Tupelo Press's Life in Art)
  • +
  • Once a Runner: A Novel
Total price: $35.52
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

“One of the best English writers of the day.”—The New York Times Book Review

“Sillitoe offers an authentic and vivacious portrait. . . . A sheer delight.”—Saturday Review
 
“A beautiful piece of work.”—The Guardian

“Brilliant.”—The New Yorker
 
“Mr. Sillitoe is a born writer, who knows his milieu and describes it with vivid, loving precision.” —Daily Telegraph
 
“There are few writers around who can rival Sillitoe when it comes to the complicated business of noticing things.” —Literary Review
 
“A master storyteller.” —The Observer
 
“Miles nearer the real thing than D.H. Lawrence's mystic, brooding working-men ever came.” —Sunday Express

About the Author

Alan Sillitoe was born in 1928, the son of a tannery worker. He left school at age fourteen to work in a factory. He was one of the working-class novelists who revitalized British fiction in the 1950s. His first novel Saturday Night and Sunday Morning was followed with the bestselling collection The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner. He adapted both works for the screen in the early 1960s. He is the author of more than 40 works of prose, poetry, and drama.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Interested in the Audiobook Edition?
If you’re the author, publisher, or rights holder of this book, let ACX help you produce the audiobook.Learn more.

Product Details

  • Series: Vintage International
  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; 1 edition (March 2, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307389642
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307389640
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #291,296 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By R. M. Peterson TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 7, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
That is the thought of ten-year-old Colin as he accompanies his cousin Bert to the Goose Fair, a traveling carnival. "If it's on'y a penny a ride then we've got two goes each," he calculates. But he also is plagued by guilt, because if he instead used the fourpence to buy ten Woodbine cigarettes and gave them to his father, then his father would not brood and abuse his mother that night. But Bert prevails on Colin to contribute the fourpence as their stake for an evening of fun. Then, by stealing, begging, cheating, and sneaking onto rides, they manage to extend their stay at Goose Fair for hours, until the merry-go-round operator sets a trap and pitches Colin from the spinning roundabout.

That's one of the nine stories of working class life in the 1930's in northern England, much of which is based on Alan Sillitoe's boyhood in Nottingham, England. But for the lowest class of English society, the precise location is irrelevant: "[E]very city's the same when you come to weigh it up: the same hostels full of thieves all out to snatch your last bob if you give them half the chance; the same factories full of work, if you're lucky; the same mildewed backyards and houses full of silverfish and black-clocks when you suddenly switch on the light at night."

It's a bleak and bitter existence. Still, many of the characters have a sense of honor and dignity -- only it's not the honor of the upper classes of England, or as one of them calls the nation, "the poxetten land of hope and glory". World War II is approaching, but the "war" Sillitoe's folks are more preoccupied with is the class war between the haves and the have nots, or the "In-law blokes" versus the "Out-law blokes".
Read more ›
2 Comments 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Alan Stilltoe was a fine writer who really exposed the grimness of life in postwar industrial England through characters who either endure lives of quiet desperation or inner rebellion. The title story in this collection is well known since it was made into a film in the 60s and it falls into the later category. The prime character is a youth living in a grim rainy gritty city in England who is caught after a robbery and sent to a Borstal where he discovers his talent for running. He then uses this to set up a rebellious tale that sets the individual against the establishment, a theme that is repeated in much of Stilltoe's work. The other stories are very good and as a collection this short book is excellent for the quality of the writing and consistency of theme.
Stilltoe's full length novel Saturday Night and Sunday morning is equally well done and worth exploring if you enjoy these stories.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
3.5/5 A collection of stories with the running theme of life for the working class British man pre & post-WWII. The main focus of each piece is a character study, with their being little to even no plot. I enjoy character stories and they are well-written gloomy fare but still I must admit they just really didn't do anything for me as a whole. Fortunately, I understood the historical and societal era the tales depicted as this is where and how my father grew up. Even though the book has a brief biographical afterword about the author I do wish there had been an Introduction which introduced us to his writing.

1. The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner - A novella taking up 29% of the entire book, this story has no plot but is the running commentary of the thoughts of a 17yo in an institution for juvenile delinquents as he trains for the annual sports day competition representing the institute as their long-distance runner. I'm guessing this takes place in the late 1950s, the youth contemplates on why he will always be of the criminal element, doesn't ever plan to change and is quite proud of the fact. His thoughts all have to do with the British class system and his contempt for anyone in authority or "lords and ladies". I didn't care for the youth at all as he was a petty thief with petty ideas of "sticking it to the man." That said, the story made me think of my dad who I do respect greatly and was by no means ever petty nor a criminal, but he was raised the same as this youth. My dad was born during WWII in Yorkshire and this youth used some slang making me think he came from the same region. This youth was a Teddy Boy, as was my dad though for him it was more of a fashion statement than the accompanying rebellious behaviour.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Wonderfully working-class [British] anti-establishment flavor. Set somewhere in the late 50's, early 60's, "The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner" captures the hardened sentiment of a frustrated, dampened and segregated society, where all of the bridges - possibly except one - as far as the main protagonist is concerned, have long ago been felled in ashes.
The "ruling-class" [almost as a social experiment] naively attempts a long needed repair to the one remaining span [between the classes] and the protagonist is [conveniently] taken in, at first, until his pal, also nicked by the coppers, pulls him back, across the rickety bridge, and "brings him - starkly - to "his senses"...
The burning of the last bridge, is both disturbing, and poignant.
One is torn into shreds, by the by the internal conflict that this little book evokes within oneself. Who is in the right...? Who knows....
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner (Vintage International)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
This item: The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner (Vintage International)